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I'd like to build a carriage stop.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    here is one I made quite some time ago. I'd make its base even wider (along the bed) now, but it serves well.





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  • Carld
    replied
    You should make a carriage stop that will also hold a dial indicator so you don't have to make two separate tools.

    As far as facing a piece, measuring it and taking a face cut again the standard method is to set the compound parallel to the ways, move the carriage so the cutter will take a face cut, tighten the carriage lock, then take the face cut with the crossfeed. Then measure the work and then use the compound to feed in how many thousandths you want to remove and take the cut with the crossfeed.

    If you start with the compound dial on "0" it is easy to know how much your removing.

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  • MotorradMike
    replied
    Hi guys:

    Been visiting outlaws for a few days and haven't seen your thoughtful responses. Thanks everyone.

    Just to clarify what I wanted:
    - I have no desire to leave the machine running and have the feed drop out before it hits the chuck. My post #9 was misleading that way.

    - All I want is a backup adjustable mechanical stop I can set and be confident that it will give me feedback if I mess up and go too far. I need to know that I will bump into it before I smash into the chuck. Willy and some others got it right.

    - In addition, I'd like to be able to face a piece, carefully measure it in the chuck, then be able to advance the carriage close to the final piece length(using the dial indicator) before measuring carefully again.

    Seems like there are lots of designs for these. You guys have provided some pictures, I can go from there.

    Thanks again.

    Mike

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  • Boucher
    replied
    For the record a micrometer stop and a feed stop are different tools for different purposes. My Nardini lathe comes from the factory with both. The micrometer stop as posted by Carl is not to keep one from crashing into the chuck. If you want to cut another 0.001 it is sure easier than a dial indicator. The feed stop on the Nardini is a trigger mechanism that is amazingly repeatable for disengaging the power feed. I still don't turn my back on it and I still jump ever time it trips and bonks the chip pan.

    This shows the bolt on the feed stop which is going to push the plunger that is sticking out from the side of the Apron.


    The stop lever shown in the engaged position.



    The stop lever shown in the disengaged position.


    The micrometer stop is shown here.

    Please excuse the poor photo but the Micrometer stop is substantial and stout and has a graduated dial for precision cut control.

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  • Carld
    replied
    I used the Kant-Twist clamps for a stop for a long time until one day I needed a micrometer stop and had to make one. Sure am glad I was forced to make one.

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  • dp
    replied
    Originally posted by oldtiffie
    Dennis.

    Here is Bob Warfield's pic you referred to:
    I didn't want to suck up his bandwidth by directly linking the picture but yes, that's it. I like those clamps but lordy are they ever proud of them.

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Kant-twist 'em

    Dennis.

    Here is Bob Warfield's pic you referred to:


    I use those "Kant-Twist" clamps everywhere. They have copper jaws, screws and nuts and will grip anything very well and they will not "mark" stuff.

    I use them on the lathe, mill, pedestal-drill, welding, around the house etc. - everywhere.

    http://www.clampmfg.com/

    http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=e...&oq=kant-twist

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  • dp
    replied
    I had a recollection of a simple carriage stop I'd seen but which was not featured. Found it again on Bob's CNC Cookbook page. Look at the left side of this picture on the way:

    http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCMiscProjects.htm

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  • 914Wilhelm
    replied
    "Hello, my name is 914Wilhelm and I am a carriage crasher."

    I've done it at least one time and only destroyed some aluminum casting around the switches, easily fixed, never banged into the spinning chuck; thank you jesus. Scared the fecal material from my bowels though. I am cogitating about placing a trip lever near my headstock that will trip the emergency brake routine on my VFD. Make it adjustable much like a carriage stop for different tool overhang. Not intending to use this as my primary reminder to stop the feed, I know I should use my basic level of alertness to do that job. However, I fell off the alertness bandwagon once and I'll probably do it again.
    Last edited by 914Wilhelm; 12-30-2009, 07:01 PM.

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  • lakeside53
    replied
    Originally posted by JCHannum
    Bad idea and poor advice. The feed clutch is not intended for use as a release.

    Use the carriage stop as Carld describes. Disengage the feed before the stop is contacted and hand feed to bump against the stop.

    Yes, you're right... I didn't type what I really meant! I thought it was slightly tongue-in-cheek - it was a bit misleading, but soon corrected by others!

    That's usually what do... I should have said "when aggressive roughing"... In other words, it happens now and then (operator error) and the stop saves the work - NOT as a routine matter. Without the feed clutch, something would break. A friend of mine won't use a stop - he's seen a lathe with a chunk broken out of the bed (I'm betting either the shear pin was replaced with "something stronger", or the clutch was frozen).


    My small Emco V10P actually works well when using the clutch against the stop, and is an [Emco] recommend procedure... it does of course assume you have adjusted the clutch correctly - most I've see haven't ever been cleaned or adjusted. My big lathe has a ratcheting type clutch and feeding on purpose against a stop would be dumb at best. Does wake you up though
    Last edited by lakeside53; 10-17-2010, 10:03 PM.

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Stop it

    Originally posted by MotorradMike
    OK, found that but I'm thinking it's a carriage 'lock'. What I want is something to stop the carriage before it hits the chuck or to mount a dial indicator to watch movement.

    Maybe I have the terminology wrong.

    Mike
    Mike,

    there is some confusion among some here who seem to think that you are relying on hitting the stop under power(ed) feed and having the stop cause your feed to be disengaged.

    I can't see where you've said that.

    I presumed that you were going to bring the carriage up to and touch the stop using the hand-power carriage feed wheel - even if you were using power feed - which would have (to) be disengaged just before you hit the stop.

    I have the same lathe (no power feed other than the lead-screw).

    As matters of purely personal preference:
    1.
    I don't use the lead-screw and screw-cutting facility for power feed;

    2.
    I don't like using a dial indicator excessively on a vibrating machine as it does not improve the indicator; and

    3.
    I set physical stops (clamps and/or screws etc.) as my stops.

    There are a lot of satisfactory ways of doing these things and it is up to the individual/you to make his/your own judgments and to use what suits him for the job at the time.

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  • Circlip
    replied
    Go to post 9 before you jump Willy

    "What I want is something to stop the carriage before it hits the chuck "

    Regards Ian
    Last edited by Circlip; 12-30-2009, 12:46 PM.

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  • Willy
    replied
    Read the OP's original post.
    No where does he state he wants to go for coffee and let his carriage go along it's merry way before it goes crashing into the headstock!

    He just wants a simple carriage stop that will possibly accept a dial indicator. One he can build without the aid of a milling machine if possible.

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  • Black_Moons
    replied
    Gez, get a stopwatch
    RPM * feed rate * worklength yadayada.

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  • EVguru
    replied
    Various lathes have been built with 'feed knockoffs'.

    My Harrison has an overload clutches on both the power feed shaft and the leadscrew. The one on the power feed is adjustable and with the micrometer carriage stop tightened well up you could use it as a feed stop. As a rule I don't, but when turning a long shaft, or using a very fine feed, there is a temptation to do something else. Once I tied a bit of string to the carriage and arranged it to operate an alarm clock bell near the end of cut.

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