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I'd like to build a carriage stop.

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  • Black_Moons
    replied
    Carriage stops are not designed to 'stop you smashing' into the chuck, theres no excuse to ever let your tool feed into it unless your working within 1mm of the chuck. And then you should be using softjaws so it would be ok to hit the chuck as you should know its not sane to work that close with hard jaws

    Carriage stops are designed for repeatively stoping the carriage under *very* light manual force (And often can be pumped outta place by a hard feed, Hmm, next project, bigger better carriage stop clamp..), for things like turning to a consistant shoulder over multiple passes.

    Especialy useful when doing stuff like boring to a fixed depth, or doing wide grove features on an inside bore (I wish I had two for that!)

    That said, people have made automatic carriage stops, but they do NOT use the typical feed clutch. they use thier own (custom added) dog arrangement on the feed gearbox to posatively disengage the feed on a electronic or mechanical signal.. And they have been known to screw up resulting in crashs into the chuck, especialy when first testing.
    Personaly iv kinda wanted to try one that uses pnumatics to just flip my feed levers after an electronic switch is toggled (electric air solanoid).. But id likey do something stupid like try and use it with my compressor turned off and pressured down..

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  • nheng
    replied
    Originally posted by JCHannum
    Bad idea and poor advice. The feed clutch is not intended for use as a release...
    I agree as it creates wear on the clutch as well as impact and wear on the gears and other drive components. BUT, it is recommended in more than one lathe manual or machining text.

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  • nheng
    replied
    Here's a turret style carriage stop from a South Bend lathe I sold a few years back. Very nice unit, the core rotates with spring loaded ball detents at the screw locations, ball oiler on top. This type can be very handy for multiple shoulders, groove locations, etc. Den



    nudder view ...

    Last edited by nheng; 12-30-2009, 11:38 AM.

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  • JCHannum
    replied
    Originally posted by lakeside53
    Stops are very useful if you have a feed clutch. I'll often use the stop/cluch for aggressive roughing.
    Bad idea and poor advice. The feed clutch is not intended for use as a release.

    Use the carriage stop as Carld describes. Disengage the feed before the stop is contacted and hand feed to bump against the stop.

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  • Carld
    replied
    MotorradMike, I have to agree with others, on a manual lathe there is nothing that will stop the carriage except you. Only a few lathes were designed for a manual automatic stop and they are rare.

    Clamping something on the way will not stop the carriage in power feed from hitting the chuck. Only you disengaging the power feed will stop the carriage. Some lathes have a slip clutch on the feeds and using that will wear it out as it's not designed to be used like that. Some lathes have a shear pin in the feed screw but you don't want to have to replace a shear pin for each cut you make.

    What it boils down to is YOUR going to have to start and stop the carriage where you want it to. The other option is to buy a CNC lathe.

    A carriage stop like the one I posted is a positive stop that you manually hand feed the carriage up to. You can use the power feed within about 1/2" and disengage the feed and hand feed it to the stop. I usually power feed within 1/4" or less but I have a lot of practice doing it.

    You need a CNC lathe.
    Last edited by Carld; 12-30-2009, 10:37 AM.

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  • Circlip
    replied
    It sounds as if you want to be doing something else while the lathe is doing its own thing.

    The carriage stop you need is called CNC.

    Regards Ian.

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  • lakeside53
    replied
    Stops are very useful if you have a feed clutch. I'll often use the stop/cluch for aggressive roughing.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by MotorradMike
    OK, found that but I'm thinking it's a carriage 'lock'. What I want is something to stop the carriage before it hits the chuck or to mount a dial indicator to watch movement.

    Maybe I have the terminology wrong.

    Mike
    ok here is the deal you say you want something to stop the carriage before it hits the chuck , my opnion watch what your doing and it wont happen ,if you have a moving carriage and it comes to a stop by a device such as you are wanitng.. its going to to cause damage likey to the brass half nut or worse,

    if you are in front of a machine thats doing a job you never turn your back to it ever,,

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  • dp
    replied
    If you have a lathe you can do basic milling. Clamp your piece to an angle plate on your cross slide and mill away.

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  • Carld
    replied
    You could modify my carriage stop for a dial indicator but if you use a dial indicator it's not really a carriage stop. Having a firm stop to run the carriage against has more benefits than just a dial indicator.





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  • MotorradMike
    replied
    OK, found that but I'm thinking it's a carriage 'lock'. What I want is something to stop the carriage before it hits the chuck or to mount a dial indicator to watch movement.

    Maybe I have the terminology wrong.

    Mike

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by MotorradMike
    I've searched around here and haven't found anything.

    Sort of like this one but I don't see the need to go across both ways.

    I will want to change out the stop for a dial indicator. I have a Craftex B2227L.

    Pics anyone?

    Thanks
    Mike
    your b2227l already has a built in carraige stop.. look for the nut int he middle under your cross slide its the only one there you will see in fact parts of the stop over haing remove the nut drop the plate down flip it so it cross's the ways and reattach the nut now to make it better added in a spring so you can spring load the plate this way it wont flop around on you and you will only need a 1/4 turn left or right to tighten or losen it ,, pretty simple

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  • MotorradMike
    replied
    Just looked at the pics again. I don't think I can make that pretty without a mill.

    Brian: How did you get the sawcut for the dial indicator clamp so straight?


    Mike

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  • MotorradMike
    replied
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow
    Motorrad---I have the same lathe, and I built a carriage stop for it and posted it on this forum. In fact, I built one as well for the other axis of travel on the same lathe and posted it on here. Do a search under my name.---Brian
    Found your carriage stop thread and saved the pics. I'm going to build one with a jigsaw and a file. I'm pretty good with a file.

    Thanks,
    Mike

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  • miker
    replied
    Mike, your not doing anything wrong in the search. I knew that particular thread was there somewhere and others like it. Just opened a few till I hit it.

    Yes, a mill does seem to be neccessary, but I'm sure a lot have been made without the use of a mill. Maybe a Jigsaw or (shudder) a Hacksaw etc to make the V cut out.

    Rgds

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