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  • Die Making Project

    Hi everyone!

    I figure I would share project that took up 5 days to do. You'll understand why it took so long to do after all the pics and the way I had to do it.

    I had to replace a die section for an old trim die that was back in 1919.



    The die section has been welded a couple of times and breaking through the weld again



    Here is a pic of the end of the other die showing it's age



    Another of the nasty welded job done on it


  • #2
    One of the things that made this project a little tricky was the fact that the punch is tapered bigger towards the punch holder.



    Because of this I had to open the clearance up on the die section to specific point on the punch.

    Normal our die are made out of house, but this time they wanted to save money and had me make it. A lot of this project was done by hand. So it is a little tricky getting it to where you want. Our dies for this for this process are made with 0.0005" to 0.0015" per side of clearance with 1 degree of taper in the opening to allow the part to fall out.

    I started out with a piece of AIRDI-150 (D-2) that is 1" X 3" X 7.75", squared up and began the layout of it.



    After the layout, center punched all over the place to drill out a lot of the material.



    After a little while I had all the drilling done on it.

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    • #3
      After the drilling my layout lines where getting a little hard to see, so I had to re-layout my lines. Here are couple pics of my lay out.





      After I got my lines layed out, I proceeded to mill out some more of the excess material out.

      Here is what it looked like after I was done with the milling.



      After that I started to attack it on a Buterfly die filer.



      It took several hours of filing like this to get close to start hand fitting the die section to the punch. The reason the filing took so long is I was also putting in the 1 degree of taper in.

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      • #4
        After all the work done on the die filer





        Then I clamped the old and the new together to do get the shape closer to what the punch fit before.





        You can see in the pics I beefed up the new die section compaired to the old die section.

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        • #5
          After all of that it was time to start hand fitting the punch.



          After some more hours the punch fit to the point where it can not be used any more in production.







          Now that the punch fits all I need to do is mill the 4 degree sides on it.

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          • #6
            Now the 4 degrees are milled on it.



            The new die section should be back from heat treat this week, reflaten and sharpen, it will be ready for production run.

            In the time I spent waiting for it to come back I decide I would re-square the punch holder and sharpen the punch.



            The above pic is the punch off the holder. I don't have a pic of the punch after it was trued up. I will have pics of the whole die later this week.

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            • #7
              Nice work, what does this die punch make?
              It's only ink and paper

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              • #8
                That's quite a project. Great work.
                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Carld
                  Nice work, what does this die punch make?
                  This die is actually used to make the scales for a pocket knife here at Queen Cutlery Company. http://www.allaboutpocketknives.com/queen/index.php

                  Thanks guys.

                  I'll get a pic of a knife that was made on the orginal die up here later.

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                  • #10
                    Old school, very nice, about the only thing you didn't do was drag out the slip stones. Make sure and punch your name and date in the end, like the old one, cause some guy like you might be luck enough to be reworking this piece in 90 years!
                    James Kilroy

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                    • #11
                      Here is a pic of the knife that it will make parts for specificly the handles or scale.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jkilroy
                        Old school, very nice, about the only thing you didn't do was drag out the slip stones. Make sure and punch your name and date in the end, like the old one, cause some guy like you might be luck enough to be reworking this piece in 90 years!
                        No I didn't drag out the slip stones, the stone I had to use were not small enough to get into the smaller end of the die section. I did a lot of draw filing though, it gve some good results though. But I did my name and date in the end. Someone probably will in 90 years

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                        • #13
                          Enjoyed!

                          Thanks for this thread. It is just the kind of thread that reminds me that handwork can still get the job done. Some days I feel like nothing is gonna happen unless it's at a computer or on a computer controlled machine.

                          The shape of the die was familiar but I couldn't place it; to see the knife was like finishing a good mystery book.

                          How would you rate the quality of these knives? I may well want to get one now that I "know" the guy who made the die...

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Wasteland16354
                            Hi everyone!

                            I figure I would share project that took up 5 days to do. You'll understand why it took so long to do after all the pics and the way I had to do it.

                            I had to replace a die section for an old trim die that was back in 1919.

                            .................................................. .....................
                            That's exactly the way my old die making text books show. You did a good job.

                            Assuming your total cost to the company is at least $50/hour (salary + overhead). That'd be $400/day or $2000/week.

                            If you have a CAD file for the design I think you could have had a new punch and die cut on a wire EDM out of pre-hardened material for less.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DR

                              If you have a CAD file for the design I think you could have had a new punch and die cut on a wire EDM out of pre-hardened material for less.
                              Die from 1919, clearances of 0.0005 to 0.0015............................................ .....
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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