Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vacuum chips on lathe while working?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vacuum chips on lathe while working?

    I always clean up my lathe at the end of the day with a shop vac. The other day I tried just for fun holding the vacuum nozzle by the work piece while it was being worked. I was surprised a bit that the vacuum sucked up just about all the chips coming off the work and kept the tooling clean while working. So it got me to thinking of getting a small shop vac to install permanently under the lathe and running the hose up to some sort of flexible positioning fixture. Kind of like the flexible positioning work lights. Than I can position the vac hose right up to the work piece and suck up 95% of the chips as they happen and keep the tooling clean at the same time.


    If any have done this already how does it work out? If not think it is a good idea? Any drawbacks that I am not thinking of?
    Andy

  • #2
    I've done it for a limited amount of cast iron and turning some anodized stock. Also considered it for tool post grinding but that's where hot chips and sparks become a concern (in my mind). If precautions were taken such as metal pipe and sucking it to the outdoors into an intermediate container, it might be ok. Similar to what is done in woodworking with vortex creating arrangements. Den

    Comment


    • #3
      Never done it with the lathe, but I have done it on the mill when working with GPO-3, the red fiberglass electrical insulating material. it worked actually quite well.

      The dust from GPO-3 is very abrasive and irritating, I wanted it gone with no muss no fuss no bother. Only a little got away.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't know why grinding would produce enough sparks to melt anything. Maybe enough to start strongly depositing debrie onto the surface of the plastic, but as I understand it lathe/mill/etc grinding is supposed to be very light passes.

        Iv actualy got plans in the works for a vacuum fixture for my back of my headstock for through hole boring.
        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Black_Moons
          Iv actualy got plans in the works for a vacuum fixture for my back of my headstock for through hole boring.


          That is a great idea as well!
          Andy

          Comment


          • #6
            I use an old shop vac all the time to clean up chips. Can't say I've tried it while cutting though. Depending on material, half the time the chips are long stringys so a vac wouldn't work. I keep my lathe lathered up in way oil when not in use, then when it's time to work, it gets wiped down dry and a little strategic relubing under the carraige. That way the chips dont stick to everything and cleanup is much easier. Pull the big stuff out by hand, vac the rest and oilit up for storage.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hmmm

              This has got me thinking. Maybe spay mist on one side, and small wet dry vacuum nozzle on the other. Seems like it would eliminate some mess and make the spray mist even colder.

              Comment


              • #8
                Shop vacs work great to continualy pull off long stringy chips if you get the vac JUST right, iv tryed it on UHMW, you want stingy there is no stringyer... Plastics are horrable.
                heres evans picture of some nylon to demonstrate just how stringy the chips are:
                Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                Comment


                • #9
                  only draw back in my opinion is the noise of a shop vac, not a very pleasant sound. I have a vac with a hepa filter that I use when I machine G-10 and other nasty stuff.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yes
                    Use it when I machine plastics on the cnc mill,
                    And when I machine bronze.
                    Yes the noise can get to ya
                    please visit my webpage:
                    http://motorworks88.webs.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      you could opt for one of those 'central house' vacuum systems that sits outside in a shed..
                      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use this on my machines.

                        http://www.modularhose.net/pdf/loc25.pdf
                        I'm in it for the parking....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Black_Moons
                          you could opt for one of those 'central house' vacuum systems that sits outside in a shed..
                          Or build a box of acoustic ceiling tile around the shop vac. I lined a closet that contained a central HVAC with the tile and it sure made a difference.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There is a risk of fire if you're vacuuming sparks- not a big risk but enough to pay some attention to. If there's a cloth or paper bag, maybe it could be replaced with a stainless mesh bag- just an idea. I like the idea of suction while machining- kind of the same in a way as supplying cutting fluid through a positionable hose. One supplies continuous cutting ease and the other supplies continuous cleaning of the mess. The only thing I don't like is the noise- I'd rather have a geared-up induction motor driving the impeller than a universal brushed motor whining away at high speed. One advantage of that is you won't have the air going through the motor, so there's less chance of an ignition.

                            There is a power penalty of course- vacuum systems draw considerable power constantly while running, and it's highest when everything is working right and the system is clean.
                            Last edited by darryl; 01-03-2010, 04:07 PM.
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Works for plastics

                              I have set up a standard nozzle on my shop vac to run while machining delrin. At even slow cutting speeds, it's almost impossible to deal with the rapidly growing quantity of plastic 'string' that comes off in an unbroken fashion (never could work out a chip-breaker :-( )
                              With the nozzle close up against the workpiece from the back, the beginning of the 'string' gets sucked in immediately, and the rest follows, leading to a very boring machining session, compared with way too exciting - building up to a disaster. While it is running, you would never guess what was going on inside - and when I forget to set it up the next time, I quickly remember :-)
                              Richard in Los Angeles

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X