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  • #61
    Originally posted by Uncle O
    Mark,
    it would appear that you started the whole pissing match back in post # 5
    by inferring the Imp. system to be inferior.
    If you find it to be so difficult to use by all means don't strain your tiny cranium in attempting to do so. We wouldn't want you to stroke out....
    As it has been noted and stated we have no difficulty using both systems,
    and switching back and forth is done with relative ease.
    Except for you and some others who insist on bashing us "dumb yanks" for NOT using YOUR preferred or perhaps only known way of measuring, I only see us "Dumb yanks" showing you the folly of your ASSertion that yours makes sense and ours doesn't.
    Now , don't be such a wanker and go piss off eh ?
    Actually I think I'd probably have to agree with all that
    As another one who uses both and finds them equally as good in most cases, I'd also have to say that in the majority of cases I think metric measurements are simpler to use.
    However I still flick the DRO onto inches when I'm using the edge finder then switch back to mm after it's zero-ed, it just seems easier that way but perhaps it's a personal quirk.

    Whilst I wouldn't try hard to persuade anyone to change from the system they understand well and are comfortable with, it's worth asking the dyed-in-the-wool sceptics on both sides to try and understand the 'other' system better before dismissing it out of hand as useless.

    Peter

    Comment


    • #62
      Somewhere in the bowels of this forum is a thread on where the "10" in 10-32 comes from.

      I considered going completely metric in the home shop since I use it heavily at work (fiber / optics) too. I found that the hardware just ain't there (in many ways) although the prices are.

      Den
      Last edited by nheng; 01-16-2010, 05:50 PM.

      Comment


      • #63
        mardtrp --

        Your calling the U.S. monetary system "metric" caught me off guard, so I looked up the word "metric". The relevant definitions can be summarized either as 1) a measurement system having meters, kilograms, and second as the basic units, or 2) a standard for measurement.

        Since the U.S. monetary system isn't commonly measured in meters, kilograms, or seconds, I have to presume that the second definition is appropriate to the thought you expressed.

        Now that I understand what you have said, I can reply.

        Thank you. Although only one of a large number of people concerned about the world's present economic situation, I certainly hope that the U.S. monetary system continues to set the standard against which other monetary systems are measured and judged.

        Incidentally, it's an interesting coincidence that the basic units of the meter-kilogram-second metric system are decimally divided, as is the basic unit of the U.S. monetary system, the U.S. dollar.

        John

        Comment


        • #64
          I'm with John from the UK, metric is easier.

          It is overtaking the US more and more. The sooner you learn it and except it the better off you will be.

          7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, 13/16, 7/8, 15/16, 1

          Or

          10mm, 11mm, 12mm, 13mm, 14mm, 15mm...
          Andy

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by John Garner
            mardtrp --

            Your calling the U.S. monetary system "metric" caught me off guard, so I looked up the word "metric". The relevant definitions can be summarized either as 1) a measurement system having meters, kilograms, and second as the basic units, or 2) a standard for measurement.

            Since the U.S. monetary system isn't commonly measured in meters, kilograms, or seconds, I have to presume that the second definition is appropriate to the thought you expressed.

            Now that I understand what you have said, I can reply.

            Thank you. Although only one of a large number of people concerned about the world's present economic situation, I certainly hope that the U.S. monetary system continues to set the standard against which other monetary systems are measured and judged.

            Incidentally, it's an interesting coincidence that the basic units of the meter-kilogram-second metric system are decimally divided, as is the basic unit of the U.S. monetary system, the U.S. dollar.

            John

            People confuse Metric with decimal.

            Metric, Imperial measurement and U.S. money are all decimal but only Metric is Metric.

            The Imp./Metric argument is like talking about different and or lack of religions, best not to go there, you will never agree on anything, because the other guy is always wrong.

            Here is a question for the Brits or Aussies/kiwi's, if you go to a lumber yard to buy some studs do you ask for 50 x 100 mm's or do you still ask for 2 x 4's.
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by loose nut
              People confuse Metric with decimal.


              Here is a question for the Brits or Aussies/kiwi's, if you go to a lumber yard to buy some studs do you ask for 50 x 100 mm's or do you still ask for 2 x 4's.
              Neither, it would be the larger dimension first, so 100 x 50 or 4 x 2.
              Either of those, probably.

              Oh, and we don't have lumber yards in the UK
              Timber yards, before and after metrication.
              To the best of my knowledge, hardwood is still sold here in Imperial dimensions but softwood in metric, and plywood still comes in actual 8' x 4' sheets to a metric thickness but if you ask for an 8' x 4' of 6mm steel plate you get 2550 x 1250mm

              Tim
              Last edited by Timleech; 01-17-2010, 01:11 PM.

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by Timleech
                To the best of my knowledge, hardwood is still sold here in Imperial dimensions but softwood in metric, and plywood still comes in 8' x 4' sheets to a metric thickness.

                Tim
                And here, plywood comes in metre dimensioned pieces as well as 4 x 8
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by vpt
                  I'm with John from the UK, metric is easier.

                  It is overtaking the US more and more. The sooner you learn it and except it the better off you will be.

                  7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, 13/16, 7/8, 15/16, 1

                  Or

                  10mm, 11mm, 12mm, 13mm, 14mm, 15mm...
                  You don't state your location.... probably far from teh US....

                  Carpenters use fractions.... because they always have.

                  Anyone else who makes an accurate measurement uses decimal.....

                  All "furriners" compare only fractional with the decimal metric, and apparently assume that US machinists make measurements to 512ths of an inch

                  The one and sole real benefit to using metric in daily life is simply because it is so widespread......

                  It would be nice if metric were standardized as well, but just because it is widespread means it is a functional decision to use it, warts and all.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Timleech
                    ... and plywood still comes in actual 8' x 4' sheets to a metric thickness
                    Ha. Kind of like the failed Mars orbiter project?

                    That's the case over here too. I think every year or few they make it 1mm thinner.
                    Now there's a non-standard for you. Lumber.
                    What is the point as you approach 1" where you can no longer label something to be 2". It gets compressed thinner ever few years.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by J Tiers
                      You don't state your location.... probably far from teh US....

                      I thought I had my location listed in my profile. I live in stevens point, WI
                      Andy

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Timleech
                        Neither, it would be the larger dimension first, so 100 x 50 or 4 x 2.
                        Either of those, probably.

                        Oh, and we don't have lumber yards in the UK
                        Timber yards, before and after metrication.
                        To the best of my knowledge, hardwood is still sold here in Imperial dimensions but softwood in metric, and plywood still comes in actual 8' x 4' sheets to a metric thickness but if you ask for an 8' x 4' of 6mm steel plate you get 2550 x 1250mm

                        Tim
                        I'm guess that you still quote 4 x 2's or 8' x 4' sheets because it is easier then asking for a 2550 x1250 mm sheets. For some things Imperial is better then Metric.
                        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by loose nut
                          I'm guess that you still quote 4 x 2's or 8' x 4' sheets because it is easier then asking for a 2550 x1250 mm sheets. For some things Imperial is better then Metric.
                          The steel stockholders, at least my local one, do talk in metric dimensions but know what you want if you give the imperial sheet size.
                          I use steel in 2m x 1m and 2550 x 1250 (or is it 1225? not so sure now ) and am quite likely to place an order on the phone for " 2 No. 2 x 1 x 5mm, 3 No. 8 x 4 x 6mm" and they'll know exactly what I mean. I think if I asked for a 6 x 3 of 5mm they would query my meaning to be certain.

                          Tim

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by loose nut
                            I'm guess that you still quote 4 x 2's or 8' x 4' sheets because it is easier then asking for a 2550 x1250 mm sheets. For some things Imperial is better then Metric.
                            Noted.........

                            Where is the unit for people-size measurements? Metres are too big, you need too many decimal places. MM get ridiculous as you get into thousands of them.

                            "Oh, it's about 1.21 metres"............ that's just silly. but "it's about 4 feet" is perfect.

                            That is the good thing about inches... they are "right sized" for people-size stuff. Even feet are a good unit for people-sized stuff. Metres are not, way too big.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt
                              ............................
                              Of course it doesn't get a simpler than Metric..but I won't go there

                              Rich
                              Anybody within back-of-the-head-slapping range of Rich?
                              - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                              Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                              It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by loose nut
                                Here is a question for the Brits or Aussies/kiwi's, if you go to a lumber yard to buy some studs do you ask for 50 x 100 mm's or do you still ask for 2 x 4's.
                                In Oz and NZ lumber is not a word in common use, its all timber which is bought at the timber yard. Mention lumber and you are likely to have someone start singing the Monty Python lumberjack song.

                                Timber sizing convention here, same as the UK, is always large size first eg 6 x 2 or 150 x 50. How you refer to the timber size depends on whether you are talking about pine studs, or rough sawn hardwood.

                                Pine studs, since not long after metrification in the mid 70s, have been produced in metric sizes only, 70 x 35, 70 x 45, 90 x 35 and 90 x 45. Soft imperial conversions don't work with those sizes so they are only referred to in metric sizes.

                                Rough sawn eucalyptus hardwood on the other hand, is produced in metric equivalents of the old inch sizes, so you can refer to an either 8 x 3 or a 200 x 75 and you will get a 200 x 75.

                                Timber lengths in either pine or hardwood are in 300mm increments, ask for 10 footers and you get 3 metres.

                                The guys at the timber yard speak both metric and imperial, so you can ask for 8 foot of 70 x 45 pine or 2.7m of 4 x 2 hardwood and no one bats an eyelid.

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