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  • I use a Wholesale Tool tailstock turret to do about the same sort of thing.

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    • Well this one started out as a test piece, my first attempt at internal single point threading. It turned out nice enough so that I decided to make a mating piece for it, and ended up with a pointless little doodad:


      I had been meaning to make a small bluing pan for heat bluing small screws, and seeing these parts gave me an idea for a sort of "convertible" bluing pan, with a threaded insert full of holes for holding screws of various sizes. With the threaded insert removed, it's a regular pan that can be filled with brass shavings (or sand, salt, what-have-you) to evenly blue other small parts. Of course you'd have to be careful to keep the inside threads clean, that's one drawback.

      Since I hadn't really started with this in mind, it was a bit of a challenge to figure out how to attach a handle. I turned a steel handle with a flange on the end, then drilled and counterbored a small brass block to fit the handle and flange. I then drilled through the retaining block while it was clamped to the round pan, and tapped M1.4 threads into the pan holes. I drilled out and counterbored the two mating holes in the retaining block, then made two little M1.4 screws with long shoulders, to attach the retaining block to the pan. When attached to the pan, the retaining block held the handle captive but the pan was free to spin around on the handle. To solve that, I cross drilled the block and handle, and drove in a small brass pin. To complete the handle, I pressed on a 1/4" dowel using a tiny brass ferrule.

      Turned out pretty respectable, and I can't wait to try it out:





      Max
      http://joyofprecision.com/

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      • That would be a good one for a whatizit thread. No one would ever figure it out! Nice piece of work too!
        Kansas City area

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        • A quick reminder when making T nuts...always stake [distort or remove] the last few threads at the bottm of nut to prevent stud from protruding nut and exerting force on table slot. It is possible to break the t slot off the machine[cast iron] table.
          1969 Logan model 1875 "powermatic" 10" Lathe 1996 HF 2 HP Mill/Drill & all the tooling,tools, saws, Stick/TIG welders Oxy Acet weld cut braze equip https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/co...lies/smile.pnghttps://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/co...es/biggrin.png

          SEE MY Home Shop Videos http://www.youtube.com/user/AWDJR

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          • That is good advice. Another way is to just not run the tap all the way through.
            Kansas City area

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            • Originally posted by Fonzy4140 View Post
              A quick reminder when making T nuts...always stake [distort or remove] the last few threads at the bottm of nut to prevent stud from protruding nut and exerting force on table slot. It is possible to break the t slot off the machine[cast iron] table.
              Like so......also known as an imperfect thread.


              image hosting 15mb

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              • Originally posted by Fonzy4140 View Post
                A quick reminder when making T nuts...always stake [distort or remove] the last few threads at the bottm of nut to prevent stud from protruding nut and exerting force on table slot. It is possible to break the t slot off the machine[cast iron] table.
                i have never seen such a nut. if you use studs, how are you going to break the table? (thats why you use them, right?)

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                • This is a case of semantics. Here the "stud" refers to a metal rod threaded on both ends, rather than the integral t-nut with the stud threaded on one end and permanently fixed to the nut on the other end.
                  Kevin

                  More tools than sense.

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                  • Originally posted by dian View Post
                    i have never seen such a nut. if you use studs, how are you going to break the table? (thats why you use them, right?)
                    Kevin explained that rather nicely, my (slightly snarky, but really just an observation) is that you have lead a sheltered life.

                    Zero.

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                    • serra

                      http://s12.postimg.org/fd8fa35ul/P1010001.jpg
                      http://postimg.org/image/5sosn7gih/[IMG] img[/IMG]
                      Last edited by zago; 12-02-2017, 06:06 PM. Reason: Serra feita em casa

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                      • Originally posted by dian View Post
                        i have never seen such a nut. if you use studs, how are you going to break the table? (thats why you use them, right?)
                        Don't try this at home, but - if you put a t-nut in your expensive t-slot then screw a hardened cap head screw into the t-nut beyond bottoming out you can blow out the t-slot. That is why t-nuts have thread stops of some kind. Youtube vids are full of examples of cratered tables where someone did just this.

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                        • Boa! Quem nمo tem cمo, caça com gato
                          Helder Ferreira
                          Setubal, Portugal

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                          • Quem nao tem cao nen gato caça com sapato

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                            • O elefante lama vasculhar o mar, nمo deixa rastros.
                              Gene

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                              • It is times like this that I wish my Grandmother Falcon tried harder to teach me her native language.

                                Jack.

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