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  • Originally posted by Jack F View Post
    It is times like this that I wish my Grandmother Falcon tried harder to teach me her native language.

    Jack.
    Ok, for those who didn't use a translate service I will do it here. "Hunter without a dog use a cat" and the reply, "if you have neither, throw your shoe"
    Helder Ferreira
    Setubal, Portugal

    Comment


    • Minha retifica intera

      [IMG][/IMG][IMG] image hosting 15mb[/IMG]
      Last edited by zago; 12-02-2017, 06:05 PM. Reason: email [email protected]

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      • Don't know if anyone else here has thought about making a centering scope, but I decided to recently. I used lenses and a prism from a broken pair of cheap binoculars. I do still need to get some cross hairs in place. I only plan on using this in my small lathes for centering watch plates and bridges, so the accuracy of the scope isn't critical as long as I have the cross hairs fairly close to the actual center it'll work great.




        I couldn't get a shot through the eyepiece, showing the work, but when I was still sort of mocking it up I was able to get a pretty decent one without the eyepiece in place:


        In that last picture what you're seeing is the hole jewel in a Waltham pocket watch plate that is secured in the faceplate. Even without cross hairs (and with the image flipped) I was able to get it centered without much fuss at all.
        Max
        http://joyofprecision.com/

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        • One goodie every lathe should have is a tailstock rotating 3-jaw chuck. It's great for joining extensions on bits, sticking tubing together straightly, etc. I got a #2 Morse taper for my cheapo Buffalo chuck with a plain back-plate. I put a couple of ball bearings on the taper and snap-ringed them into the back-plate.

          Comment


          • I was faced with extracting a pair of ball bearings from a motorcycle axle hole with a spacer between them the same 5/8" I.D. as the bearings. I reduced the diameter of a 5/8" shaft long enough to enter the bearing, leaving a lip 5/8" on the end and drilled through for a bolt that I turned the head of to make a wedge. Slotted the reduced end and the resulting expansion mandrel made short work of pulling the 1st. one and of course #2 tapped out. This idea came from when I had to make mandrels to test 1- meter graphite pipes we made at 3000 lbs. tension looking for less than 0.001" stretch. I used knurled pipe fittings slotted into 1/4's with a cone and pulling ring that forced expansion as it tightened. I used stainless hose clamps to resist hoop stress on the OD. All of our pipes passed and are serving the Smithsonian in some radio-telescopes in Hawaii. My pulling machine was based on an arbor press with a Slo-Syn motor controlled by a computer driving #40 chain sprockets through a differential screw-jack. The engineers visiting from Grumman-Lockheed (or whatever) were duly impressed with my cobbling and tried to talk me into moving to CA. Thanky, but NO. They couldn't pay me enough money to live there and I am a fierce Homophobe or whatever. Besides, I was about 60 then.
            Last edited by trackfodder; 11-19-2013, 11:01 PM.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by mars-red View Post
              Don't know if anyone else here has thought about making a centering scope, but I decided to recently.
              These days I'm more likely to use a USB camera/microscope and overlay the image with crosshairs/centering circles etc.
              Paul Compton
              www.morini-mania.co.uk
              http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

              Comment


              • Originally posted by trackfodder View Post
                I was faced with extracting a pair of ball bearings from a motorcycle axle hole with a spacer between them the same 5/8" I.D. as the bearings. I reduced the diameter of a 5/8" shaft long enough to enter the bearing, leaving a lip 5/8" on the end and drilled through for a bolt that I turned the head of to make a wedge.
                I've got a very similar device for removing bearings. It's a 16mm rawlbolt.
                Paul Compton
                www.morini-mania.co.uk
                http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

                Comment


                • Junior,

                  O que esta fazendo ai além de limpar o interior de um buraco? Esta usando um bedame normal? Nمo intendo aquele bloco de metal que esta no seu carrinho.

                  Just what are you doing there besides cleaning up the inside of a hole. Are you using a normal lathe bit or something else? I don't understand that block of metal on the lathe carriage. Is it just a different type of boring bar?
                  Vitَria, Brazil

                  Comment


                  • He is using a grinding wheel.

                    Ele estل usando uma mَ de esmeril.
                    Helder Ferreira
                    Setubal, Portugal

                    Comment


                    • Completed Steve Ward's (kwackers) Rotab/Dividing head controller just need to make a plastic overlay for the display to include a legend for the button operation.









                      Used
                      Steve Ward items
                      PCB
                      Programmed PIC
                      Component pack

                      Cheap TB6560 chinese 3.5a driver
                      220ncm 1.8* stepper
                      15v laptop power supply (stripped)
                      8x8 keypad


                      Worked first time

                      Paul

                      Comment


                      • I made another gizmo I thought I would share.

                        I find that adjusting my horizontal band saw roller guides was a real pain in the neck. I am not sure how other band saw roller guides are adjusted but mine had no way of making the adjustments with any kind of precision.

                        The gizmo clamps to the fixed part of the roller guide mount, and uses screws to adjust the guides to any twist you want. It makes the adjustments a lot less of a pain.

                        Comment


                        • Press fit bush - without a micrometer

                          Hi
                          Most instructions I have seen for making a press fit bush require a micrometer and hole gauges. Too much like hard work, I suggest.

                          To put a splined bush into a pulley, I did these steps.
                          1. Drill a hole in the pully, dont bother about reaming or boring
                          2. with a bit of scrap, make a go-no go shaft, turning it between centres
                          3. set the compound at ½ to 1 degree
                          4. make the go-no go shaft into a tapered mandrel
                          5. mark the tapered section with a felt pen
                          6. push the tapered mandrel into the pulley, 'tight enough'
                          7. push the tapered mandrel out. The pulley has marked the taper's felt making pen's ink.
                          8. replace the tapered mandrel, and cut the pen's marks off the mandrel (but NO deeper)
                          9. the cutter is now set to precisely cut the bush to fit the pulley as tightly as the tapered mandrel did in the test push
                          10. not a micrometer in sight.
                            http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/images/icons/icon7.png
                          The Feral Machinist: specializing in Old Age and Treachery (beats youth and enthusiasm every time )

                          Comment


                          • [QUOTE=The Feral Machinist;887779]Hi
                            Most instructions I have seen for making a press fit bush require a micrometer and hole gauges. Too much like hard work, I suggest.

                            To put a splined bush into a pulley, I did these steps.
                            1. Drill a hole in the pully, dont bother about reaming or boring
                            2. with a bit of scrap, make a go-no go shaft, turning it between centres
                            3. set the compound at ½ to 1 degree
                            4. make the go-no go shaft into a tapered mandrel, with the go diameter at one end and the no-go diameter at the other end of the tapered section. The diameters of a sliding, light press or heavy press are all somewhere on the tapered section
                            5. mark the tapered section with a felt pen
                            6. push the tapered mandrel into the pulley, 'tight enough'
                            7. push the tapered mandrel out. The pulley has marked the taper's felt making pen's ink.
                            8. replace the tapered mandrel between centres, and cut the pen's marks off the mandrel (but NO deeper)
                            9. the cutter is now set to precisely cut the bush to fit the pulley as tightly as the tapered mandrel was pushed in the test push
                            10. if you leave a little of the pen marks, the fit will be tighter, or if you cut a tad deeper, the fit will be loose or sliding, your choice.
                            11. ... and not a micrometer in sight.

                            Oops, pressed the wrong button, I meant to preview my post!

                            I would be interested to find out if this is an original idea, a quick google did not find this idea elsewhere on the net.

                            All the best,
                            The Feral Machinist: specializing in Old Age and Treachery (beats youth and enthusiasm every time )

                            Comment


                            • [QUOTE=The Feral Machinist;887780]
                              Originally posted by The Feral Machinist View Post
                              Hi
                              Most instructions I have seen for making a press fit bush require a micrometer and hole gauges. Too much like hard work, I suggest.

                              To put a splined bush into a pulley, I did these steps.
                              1. Drill a hole in the pully, dont bother about reaming or boring
                              2. with a bit of scrap, make a go-no go shaft, turning it between centres
                              3. set the compound at ½ to 1 degree
                              4. make the go-no go shaft into a tapered mandrel, with the go diameter at one end and the no-go diameter at the other end of the tapered section. The diameters of a sliding, light press or heavy press are all somewhere on the tapered section
                              5. mark the tapered section with a felt pen
                              6. push the tapered mandrel into the pulley, 'tight enough'
                              7. push the tapered mandrel out. The pulley has marked the taper's felt making pen's ink.
                              8. replace the tapered mandrel between centres, and cut the pen's marks off the mandrel (but NO deeper)
                              9. the cutter is now set to precisely cut the bush to fit the pulley as tightly as the tapered mandrel was pushed in the test push
                              10. if you leave a little of the pen marks, the fit will be tighter, or if you cut a tad deeper, the fit will be loose or sliding, your choice.
                              11. ... and not a micrometer in sight.

                              Oops, pressed the wrong button, I meant to preview my post!

                              I would be interested to find out if this is an original idea, a quick google did not find this idea elsewhere on the net.

                              All the best,
                              I don't know if that's new with you or old hat.

                              But I'm pretty sure you may not get the actual press fit you need for the application (or maybe you will, dependents on what your are after).

                              Holding work on a mandrel may be fine for holding the work, but not tight enough for the application the work will be used in (or it might, maybe the application doesn't require a major press fit (maybe it does, FN3 or something like that)

                              Here's a handy set of instructions (the pdf attached to this post); http://www.machinistweb.com/forum/sh...&postcount=271 --yeah I know I've linked to a post I made on another forum, but that's the way it goes if they don't want attachments here.

                              You know; go where it works. I'd provide a direct link to where ever it's from but I no loner know --I saved the pdf so now it's bounce you over to another forum where I uploaded it, for you to download it... oh well, I'm sure they have reasons for how they want to do stuff here & it's OK by me linking to elsewhere isn't much problem so it's all good.

                              Anyway the pdf I posted there has a wealth of info about press fits, for those that are interested. It just occurred to me that it is possible you have to be a member there to download it --I don't know. If it does and you don't want to join, sorry for the inconvenience.

                              Zero.

                              Comment


                              • A shop made tool. Lineboring machine ala Wilkinson. Made of the collumn of an old drillpress and some hidden pieces found behind the lathe.


                                The main spindle with the boring head and bearing.


                                Motor end with gearboxes. The rightmost small one is for feed. The feedscrew is a 1 meter long threaded bar, M14 and a long homemade brass nut inside the boring head. On the end of the feed screw asembley is a black socket for a 1/2" rachet wrench or drill to reset the beast.


                                Watching paint dry is boring, but boring the cylinder?
                                He is oiling the machine, one cut thru the cylinder took about 3,5 hour and 1,5 litres of oil.

                                Or maybe this one doesn't qualify for a shop made tool?

                                Ragnar
                                Last edited by Steamfixer; 12-08-2013, 02:16 PM. Reason: Typo's and more sense.

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