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  • Originally posted by ncjeeper View Post
    Shop grill.
    awesomeness
    san jose, ca. usa

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    • Nothing special......I just whipped up a new rest for my bench grinder. The factory one was crap.
      Before.

      After.

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      • Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
        Got time to make some new tools, and photograph some previously made tools again, so here goes.

        Thread bit grinding fixture.

        It can do 55*, and 60*, with a 10* side clearance angle, and hold bits up to 3/8"

        and in use

        Worked pretty good. I roughed out 3 new bits (one double ender) by hand on a bench grinder, then finished them with the jig, in about 20 minutes. Touching them up after the fact now will be really easy. This was made using a scrap of 4140 that has been kicking around my desk for about 6 months looking to be made into something, so that's why it's the size it is. If I make another (and i will) it will be larger so as not to need blocking in on the surface grinder. Took about 30 minutes of my time to make, maybe less, maybe more, wasn't really paying attention. I ball cut the angles in the cnc (cheated, ), so it did all the work.

        The bit shown will be split for an internal threading tool (still need to make the bar). I'll be making a er collet chuck ( a 32, and 16)for my super 7 shortly so that's why I included the 55* angle.
        I really like the tool just pick up an inexpensive surface grinder would like more details on how this is made thanks ED I could easily see this for sale in MSC or other catalog companies.
        Ed
        Agua Dulce, So.California
        1950 F1 street rod
        1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
        1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
        1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
        1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

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        • If the price is reasonable I certainly would purchase on. Great idea!!


          Skipd1

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          • Originally posted by Ed ke6bnl View Post
            I really like the tool just pick up an inexpensive surface grinder would like more details on how this is made thanks ED I could easily see this for sale in MSC or other catalog companies.

            Thanks for the compliment. I drew a toolbit in cad (rhino) and then just offset the angles so they fit inside the block I had on hand. Then I used the cnc mill at work and cut the angles with a ball endmill. No reason you couldn't make one with a sine vice, and a manual mill. I honestly just don't enjoy cranking handles anymore, when I can do something more efficiently in one of the CNC's at work. I should have used a bigger block for more surface area on the mag chuck, but it's not bad if I block it in.

            I've seen pictures of similar grinding fixtures before for 60*, but not one with both 55* and 60*.

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            • Originally posted by R.Bolte.Jr View Post
              Faced with needing to make several different timing pulleys for a prototype project, and not having any kind of indexing equipment yet...
              I realized I had change gears for the Logan, in all of the tooth counts I needed. Simple rig to use the different gears as indexes for the pulleys. The pin slides out to accommodate different sized gears. A boring bar with a HSS bit, ground to the profile, chucked in the mill, cuts the groves. It will work until I decide which direction to go for more tooling...
              Hello
              I don't know if you have finished your prototype, but if you're interested, here is the one in the same manner I use on my metal shaper : http://www.lecollectionneur.ch/etau-limeur/

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              • Originally posted by PixMan View Post
                Cool....er....hot!

                Does the food cooked on it have that "Castrol infused" flavor?
                Amsoil.........

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                • Well I finely got around to making a roller stand for my cutoff saw. For years I put up with the wooden one in the background, what a pain in the drain. The base is a front brake drum late 30’s Ford and the roller I salvaged from table saw roller stand.


                  This is a close up of my over kill height adjustment.

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                  • Nice!!!

                    Originally posted by jcon View Post
                    Well I finely got around to making a roller stand for my cutoff saw. For years I put up with the wooden one in the background, what a pain in the drain. The base is a front brake drum late 30’s Ford and the roller I salvaged from table saw roller stand.


                    This is a close up of my over kill height adjustment.
                    1973 SB 10K .
                    BenchMaster mill.

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                    • Originally posted by ncjeeper View Post
                      Shop grill.
                      Our version:


                      Drive wheel and spark plug used.
                      Be healthy!

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                      • Welcome to the forums OFF-ROAD36! Nice bit of work there. Is the spark plug for starting the fire?
                        Kansas City area

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                        • Spark plugs are used as door hinges.
                          The fire ignited traditionally matches.
                          Also we produced smokebox for fish and meat for this stove.
                          It's great!
                          Be healthy!

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                          • very fancy offroad36
                            san jose, ca. usa

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                            • I recently made my first threading tap. 1/4-25tpi, to fit a small leadscrew I made for another project. Here is a pic of the finished tap, and a pic of the leadscrew threaded into a hole in a scrap piece of aluminum. It cuts well, but requires very frequent chip clearing, as I favored strength over extra room for chips. We'll see how it it works in steel next.





                              Edit: Fixed the pics.
                              Last edited by mars-red; 08-30-2015, 08:28 PM.
                              Max
                              http://joyofprecision.com/

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                              • Hey, that's a good looking tap! What material and HT?

                                Pete
                                1973 SB 10K .
                                BenchMaster mill.

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