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  • Originally posted by Peter. View Post
    Here is my humble submission - a TC tipped parting tool blade.

    Take one used & abused TC wood blade, and cut a piece out with a good tooth on it:



    Fit it into a standard parting tool holder:



    Hone the edge a bit so it's nice and sharp:



    Here's how it performs:

    http://peterrimmer.myby.co.uk/vids/parting_.wmv
    I made a bunch of those and they saved the day for aluminum, and worked on some semi hard steel(I needed to run it upside down)
    Ed
    Agua Dulce, So.California
    1950 F1 street rod
    1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
    1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
    1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
    1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

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    • Day three of reading this thread : Thanks to all :

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      • This is a tap holder I built for my lathe,works great and can hold a lot of different sizes





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        • Oooh, nice. Especially utilizing that cuter than spit little spline shaft.
          .
          "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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          • I did this in 1973 on a Yamaha 250. I made the mandrel an a lathe and spun the head and removed way more than I needed, about an 1/8th of an inch. Long story short it worked.

            Craig

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            • Hey Tundra Twin Track. Love your small 4 jaw universal chuck tap holder. I have a small 3" similar chuck and was thinking of doing the same as you. Wondering what size your chuck is? Did you make the splines on the shafting and the internal splines or repurpose some existing parts? I imagine that a single keyed slot would work as well and it's doable for me.

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              • I'm just curious here but why go to the bother of building a sliding tapping device when the tailstock is made to slide on the ways. I have always just used a standard Jacobs superchuck in the tailstock and let the tailstock unclamped and slid it into and out of the tapped hole. This is how I learned to tap in a lathe from about a dozen full time lathe hands when I was serving my apprenticeship.

                Brian

                Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
                This is a tap holder I built for my lathe,works great and can hold a lot of different sizes





                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                THINK HARDER

                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                • Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
                  I'm just curious here but why go to the bother of building a sliding tapping device when the tailstock is made to slide on the ways. I have always just used a standard Jacobs superchuck in the tailstock and let the tailstock unclamped and slid it into and out of the tapped hole. This is how I learned to tap in a lathe from about a dozen full time lathe hands when I was serving my apprenticeship.

                  Brian
                  Same here, But on the way back out, I apply a slight pressure to the tailstock to help the tap back out of the hole. I do like the sliding tap holder though, Very nice work. I think having that would be better on large lathes, with small taps. Trying to drag a 100# tailstock with a 6-32 tap but be.....fun.

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                  • I jus wanna know where you found the little 4-jaw scroll chuck. Never seen one before. A link would be good. And the cost too...
                    Cheers,
                    Joe

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                    • hello
                      after long time of stalking this thread, i would like to share some of my tools.

                      my first ever workpiece on mill, flycuter:


                      cutoff toolholder for lathe:


                      dividing plates for my dividing head. i made it using dividing plate from unknown head (few numbers usable), angle vernier for my dividing head and paper templates ploted from autocad. there is ca 980 holes. plates are doublesided


                      boring head, 75mm long dovetail leadscrew M10x0.75, and 75 divisions 0.02mm each (0.00078in) direct reading, 25MM straight shank
                      Last edited by Kolacek; 11-23-2015, 05:33 PM. Reason: garamar

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                      • Comment


                        • [QUOTE=Tundra Twin Track;1015167]This is a tap holder I built for my lathe,works great and can hold a lot of different sizes




                          Great project!
                          My concern with it is that there is no forgiveness built into it, meaning that it's going break the tap if it binds up or bottoms out. If you clamp it on the round shank it can spin in the chuck rather than create the carnage that can occur when a tap snaps.
                          Just my opinion based on a few broken taps and damaged work pieces over the years, sometimes the damage to the workpiece is catastrophic compared to the loss of a tap.
                          I spent most of my money on women and booze, the rest I just wasted.

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                          • Originally posted by jrstech View Post
                            Hey Tundra Twin Track. Love your small 4 jaw universal chuck tap holder. I have a small 3" similar chuck and was thinking of doing the same as you. Wondering what size your chuck is? Did you make the splines on the shafting and the internal splines or repurpose some existing parts? I imagine that a single keyed slot would work as well and it's doable for me.
                            The 4 Jaw Came from Shars Tool $97.00 US the splined shaft came from sliding steering shaft with small U Joints each end they discard them at auto repair shops all the time,the MT taper is Extension adapter from Grizzly tools.
                            Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
                            I'm just curious here but why go to the bother of building a sliding tapping device when the tailstock is made to slide on the ways. I have always just used a standard Jacobs superchuck in the tailstock and let the tailstock unclamped and slid it into and out of the tapped hole. This is how I learned to tap in a lathe from about a dozen full time lathe hands when I was serving my apprenticeship.

                            Brian
                            My 2 speed Tail Stock weighs over a 150lbs would not feel comfortable with small taps or tapping large 3/4" that could tilt the tail stock.This slider works real slick just get 1/2'' from work push sleeve with thumb and reverse when have desired depth.

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                            • Originally posted by Kolacek View Post
                              hello
                              after long time of stalking this thread, i would like to share some of my tools.

                              my first ever workpiece on mill, flycuter:
                              Man, that's some nice work.

                              Comment


                              • [QUOTE=The Fixer;1015664]
                                Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
                                This is a tap holder I built for my lathe,works great and can hold a lot of different sizes




                                Great project!
                                My concern with it is that there is no forgiveness built into it, meaning that it's going break the tap if it binds up or bottoms out. If you clamp it on the round shank it can spin in the chuck rather than create the carnage that can occur when a tap snaps.
                                Just my opinion based on a few broken taps and damaged work pieces over the years, sometimes the damage to the workpiece is catastrophic compared to the loss of a tap.
                                If concerned of bottoming just open chuck up and grip on round portion of tap so it can slip if need be.

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