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  • Originally posted by Kolacek View Post
    Very NICE!!!

    Comment


    • It's been a particularly busy/crazy year. Started making a steady rest for my instrument lathe last January with this:



      The machine work has been finished since early February and it has been waiting till I could get the time to do the hand work to make it look like this:





      It was a bear to photograph 'cuz it is quite reflective, so I'll show what I mean in the next post...............
      Last edited by jhe.1973; 11-30-2015, 02:55 AM.
      Best wishes to ya’ll.

      Sincerely,

      Jim

      "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

      "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

      Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

      Comment


      • Here it is the the lathe along with an arbor for a clock that I am building:



        And this shows the non-distorted reflections a bit better:



        I took lots of photos 'cuz I have received requests to show setups. However, I don't know if this is the thread to show all of them.

        Anyone know if I start another thread, will this be moved out of the shop made tools thread?
        Last edited by jhe.1973; 11-30-2015, 02:54 AM. Reason: Made grammmer betterer
        Best wishes to ya’ll.

        Sincerely,

        Jim

        "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

        "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

        Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

        Comment


        • That's a really nice little steady you've made!
          Build threads should be posted on the regular board.

          Pete
          1973 SB 10K .
          BenchMaster mill.

          Comment


          • EddyCurr suggested I post this here. It never dawned on me to do it, so thanks Eddy for the idea!

            I needed to make some rivets look like factory installed ones so I made this rivet setter from 1.25 X 4.75 inch plate that I had on hand:





            The anvil is cut from a truck axle that I didn't bother to anneal, hence the shiny area near the O.D. The punch is just a 1/2 inch dowel that I also just cut a pocket in the end w/carbide, It is probably a bit below the case hardening, but is still tougher than soft.

            Here it is in the press:



            The clearance for the fender braces was cut w/a carbide burr in an air grinder.

            Here is the finished product:

            Best wishes to ya’ll.

            Sincerely,

            Jim

            "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

            "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

            Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

            Comment


            • Just to prove that I can don’t always have to make things look nice (and can do quick and dirty as well as anyone) here are a couple of my shop machines.

              The buffer I built at least 45 years ago and it is still going strong. It is one of the most useful machines I have made ‘cuz I do all my own metal finishing prior to plating to I get the results I want. Back in the day, I was doing car shows w/motorcycles and several of my friends and I did an awful lot of polishing on this machine.



              The legs used to be clothes line posts that were in our backyard. The countershaft and spindle pulley came from some old machine (don’t remember which one) that my dad and I converted to V belt drive.

              When I bought an arbor press a few years later, I needed a stand for it so I robbed the sturdy stand from my belt sander and whipped up the one seen here. IIRC, I was scraping the bottom of my metal scraps and was hard up for cash being a new parent.

              The stand shown has become a permanent-temporary project. I’ll make another in my spare time.

              Yeah right!
              Last edited by jhe.1973; 12-01-2015, 10:58 AM.
              Best wishes to ya’ll.

              Sincerely,

              Jim

              "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

              "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

              Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

              Comment


              • [QUOTE=jhe.1973;1016570]Just to prove that I can don’t always have to make things look nice (and can do quick and dirty as well as anyone.


                All look great.. I don't waste time on things that don't matter myself..

                Comment


                • I recently made a pair of 0.501" diameter filing buttons, and thought I'd share them here. I needed them to shape a small brass plate that would be inset into another part. I wanted to mill the inset using a 1/2" diameter 2 flute end mill, and the mill I'd be using is a cheap Chinese one that actually measures 0.501". That's the reason for the strange diameter.

                  I made each button with a 60 degree countersunk center on one side, so if I had been thinking I would have used the pair of them (one on each side), clamped between lathe centers, to do the filing. I will definitely try that next time, as the hokey clamp arrangement shown here was pretty awkward to file around.

                  I started with a scrap of O1 drill rod, and turned it to 0.501". The finish was real nice, and only took a few seconds to polish up. I reversed the 0.501" diameter end held in a collet, parted off the oversized end, then drilled through the whole thing with an arbitrary diameter screw machine length drill. Each end was then center drilled a bit. I hacksawed the part into two roughly equal pieces, then faced them off so that each was exactly equal in thickness (not necessary for my current use, but it's always handy to have pairs of little doodads that are exactly the same thickness).

                  The parts were then hardened in a water quench (I didn't need the extra depth of hardening an oil quench gives), and polished up. When hardening, I have taken to coating my parts in a paste of alcohol and boric acid before heating, it does a great job preventing scale from forming on the part (which is especially nice if you're quenching in oil).

                  Here are a few pics of the making:




                  Last edited by mars-red; 12-02-2015, 09:48 AM.
                  Max
                  http://joyofprecision.com/

                  Comment


                  • And a few pics of them in use:





                    Max
                    http://joyofprecision.com/

                    Comment


                    • Ironhead fender?

                      Len

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                      • Jhe1973, the Levins would be pleased with your steady rest. They made such exceptional tools.

                        Jim Williams

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by QSIMDO View Post
                          Ironhead fender?
                          Thanks to all for the nice words about my work.

                          Len: Your right about it being a HD fender but this one is for a KRTT front fender (earlier road race version of the K model).

                          There is a bit more on the fender and a few pages on the project here:

                          http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...torcycle/page6
                          Last edited by jhe.1973; 12-07-2015, 12:11 PM.
                          Best wishes to ya’ll.

                          Sincerely,

                          Jim

                          "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                          "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                          Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

                          Comment


                          • I'm building a house and a house full of cabinets, shelves and bookcases. I anticipate drilling about 2,000 holes, this will make life easier. The bushings are hardened and the photos show the adjustability of the jig. Drill rod for the adjusting rods and 1018 for the main body. The brass pins will locate the shelf once a series of holes are drilled.



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                            • This is my first attempt at a dimple die. I'm building a couple of stainless sinks, a urinal (photo below) for the shop, and a dog washing station that will handle my German Shepherds. The angle is 35 degrees and it's an 1.5 inch hole to allow for the store bought drain. The dimple allows the drain to go slightly below flush to allow everything to properly drain. This material is 16 Gauge stainless steel. The 3/4 all thread compresses the die. I was surprised how easily that worked, you can see the results. The die material is mystery metal from my scrap pile. If I was going to use this a lot I would have used 4140 and hardened it. At this size I will probably only do a half dozen. Enjoy.










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                              • Beautifully done.

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