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  • Originally posted by hammerfest View Post
    I'm building a house and a house full of cabinets, shelves and bookcases. I anticipate drilling about 2,000 holes, this will make life easier. The bushings are hardened and the photos show the adjustability of the jig. Drill rod for the adjusting rods and 1018 for the main body. The brass pins will locate the shelf once a series of holes are drilled.



    Very well made! I'm sure the cabinets will be just as nice

    Comment


    • You have a beautiful fixture there Hammer. I've drilled quite a few of those myself but only made a plywood
      template. Excellent! And the die set is really nice. Sure makes that job easy.

      Pete
      Last edited by 10KPete; 12-05-2015, 06:57 PM.
      1973 SB 10K .
      BenchMaster mill.

      Comment


      • Very nice, but it looks like you are short one hardened bushing.
        Location: Long Island, N.Y.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by hammerfest View Post
          This is my first attempt at a dimple die................................. Enjoy.
          I sure do enjoy your workmanship - on the drill jig too!

          Your dimple die reminded me of a similar two I made, but I needed a slightly different result.





          I needed to raise a lip to weld plugs and join a filler neck for this:



          For those interested, I posted this project at:

          http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...r-a-motorcycle
          Best wishes to ya’ll.

          Sincerely,

          Jim

          "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

          "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

          Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

          Comment


          • Needed a new cutting table at work,all of our sheet stock we store vertically to save space and make handling it easier.Problem is it's kind of a pain in the butt going from vertical to horizontal,so the guys helped me build this tip table.Still have to add some diagonal braces,but so far it's working good.Now one guy can pick and load with the hoist and then tip down horizontal easily and safely.

            Frame is 1-1/4" pipe and the slats are 3" wide x 16 ga and the working surface is 4x10 feet.It's also the same height from the floor as all the other work tables and saw horses so they all work together.



            I just need one more tool,just one!

            Comment


            • Nice work weirdo. You might want to consider adding a gusset from the left side near the wheel to the hinge area. Kind of reminds me of a drywall lift the way they tilt for loading.

              Brian

              Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
              Needed a new cutting table at work,all of our sheet stock we store vertically to save space and make handling it easier.Problem is it's kind of a pain in the butt going from vertical to horizontal,so the guys helped me build this tip table.Still have to add some diagonal braces,but so far it's working good.Now one guy can pick and load with the hoist and then tip down horizontal easily and safely.

              Frame is 1-1/4" pipe and the slats are 3" wide x 16 ga and the working surface is 4x10 feet.It's also the same height from the floor as all the other work tables and saw horses so they all work together.



              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

              THINK HARDER

              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

              Comment


              • My late 1940's Clausing model 111 mk3 lathe came with no gear train shroud, and my brother kept after me on the dangers of running it with those open gears spinning away. Finally, I decided something needed to be done. My first step was to make a wireframe full sized model just so I could get the feel for the curves and perhaps some insight on how to go about making one from scratch. I wanted to make the entire shroud out of at least 1/8" steel. The wireframe also helped me with clearances on gears and the sliding gear. I had no drawing, so I depended on images I found via Google. The wireframe will be tossed when I'm done with this little project.

                Next, I formed an outer frame from 1/4" CRS, striving to make it fit as
                close to the online images I'd downloaded.

                Now it was time to start bending and tack welding the sides. The upper strip
                is 2" wide, and the lower is 4" wide, all from 1/8" thick steel.

                By making a form about 3/4" oversized from the pattern I now had, I began
                making 1/16" slits about 1/4" apart around the periphery, and bending them into
                shape with pick hammer and visegrip pliers. I did not have a large enough sheet of 1/8" plate to do the entire form
                in this area, so I was forced to patch it together in pieces.


                Continued....

                Dan L
                Last edited by Danl; 10-18-2016, 02:16 PM. Reason: ISP deleted photos! Urgh...... %^&*^#^%)
                Salem, Oregon

                Comment


                • You can now see where this is going. Probably WAY too much effort going into
                  this, but I wanted it to look nice and be stout. I did consider making it out
                  of fiberglass, but gave up on that.

                  Below, shown with the mounting tabs welded on and the upper part formed and
                  rough sanded with a #60 flap disc. I stopped long enough to make the steel
                  ring insert for the spindle access hole.

                  Now I was ready to make the end plate. Same process, but it went a little
                  easier since it was so straight forward.

                  Below, after about an hour of TIG welding.
                  Salem, Oregon

                  Comment


                  • After cutting another large holes and some final grinding and sanding, I
                    gave it a very thin coat of bondo and did some final sanding.

                    Next I put down a couple of coats of high solids primer and shot it with a
                    light coat of white to help spot trouble areas before final painting.

                    I used a high speed handheld grinder with a carbide burr to remove evidence
                    of welding burn through areas, and shot a coat of auto undercoating on the
                    inside. Not that it will help with the noise, but it does make it look a little
                    better.

                    Finally, a final coat of paint. Color not matched very closely, so I may try
                    to darken up the enamel a little with some black myself.


                    Obviously not an exact duplicate of the original, but fairly close. Most photos I see show another smaller (1"?) hole in back of the sliding gear, towards the headstock, but they don't appear to line up with the upper mounting stud on the quadrant, of any of the gears, so I'm not going to drill that one in.

                    Dan L
                    Salem, Oregon

                    Comment


                    • Wow. Absolutely outstanding job.
                      Location: Long Island, N.Y.

                      Comment


                      • Very nice job. Looks like it came with the lathe
                        Larry - west coast of Canada

                        Comment


                        • Fantastic!!!
                          Mike

                          Comment


                          • Inexpensive Extention to Shop Vac Hose

                            I have posted this on a wood working board, but I think it deserves to be here too.

                            I wanted to use one of my shop vacuums for collecting saw dust while I sawed the shelves for my latest project. But I am cheap. I searched on-line for longer hoses and found prices starting at around $35 and going up from there. Plus shipping, of course. So I searched the local hardware stores and found this eight foot one for $21.99.



                            Now, eight feet is not a lot, but with the original four foot hose it would come to twelve feet and that sounded like it would be just right for my small shop. It is intended to fit several Shop-Vac models directly so there were several adapters for the vacuum end. Here you can see the contents of the box.



                            So all I needed was an easy way to splice the two hoses together. As you can see, the blank end of the new hose will easily fit over the nozzle of my small Shop-Vac's original hose, but there is nothing to hold it together and I did not want to use tape.



                            Continued below:
                            Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 12-10-2015, 02:28 PM.
                            Paul A.
                            SE Texas

                            Make it fit.
                            You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                            Comment


                            • Inexpensive Extention to Shop Vac Hose, part 2

                              But I did want it to be easy to assemble and disassemble so I could use just the original four foot hose or the combination of the two for twelve feet. Here is what I came up with.



                              I figured that the wire used in an all wire coat hanger was just the right material. I found one in my spare bedroom closet, cut off the hook, and straightened out the remainder with my bench vise and a small ball-peen hammer. I cut off about 15 inches of the wire and bent it into a square "U" with a 2.5" middle segment. Then I used a piece of one inch PVC pipe in the bench vise as a form to bend the two legs into 270 degree arcs.

                              About the first half inch of those arcs from the sharp, 90 degree bends was straightened in the vise jaws and the ends were cut to leave about 3/8" more than 180 degree arcs. About 1/4" at those ends was also straightened out. The ends were filed (sand paper would also work) to remove the burrs left by cutting. The ends are nice, half ball shapes that will not cut me or harm the vacuum hose.

                              This clip easily snaps on the ends of the two hoses and holds them together very well. It adds almost nothing to the diameter of the hose.



                              With this simple clip I can join or separate the two hoses in just a few seconds. Here you can see the nice, long, twelve foot hose on my shop vacuum.



                              It works like a charm. The combined hose acts like a single, longer hose. I used it on my track saw to cut the board that the vacuum and hose is resting on. I can leave the vacuum on the work bench and easily reach the work in the middle of the floor. And in just a few seconds the hoses can be disconnected and I am back to the original, four foot hose which is handy for many other situations. It is the best of both worlds. Not bad for $21.99, an old coat hanger, and a couple of hours of my time, including shopping for the hose.
                              Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 12-10-2015, 02:25 PM.
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              Make it fit.
                              You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                              Comment


                              • Dan, did you send this URL to our friend in Mac? I'm sure he would like to see it, because it is an outstandingly well done replica.It would actually take much more repairable abuse than the original cast iron or cast aluminum one.
                                Uh,,,,,,,You know, don't you, that the Alfred Eriksen shaper I'm restoring needs a belt cover. I bet I'd pay a lot for a hand made cover like this, and bonus, it would be far easier to make too.
                                parts

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