Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shop Made Tools

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by Danl View Post

    Obviously not an exact duplicate of the original, but fairly close. Most photos I see show another smaller (1"?) hole in back of the sliding gear, towards the headstock, but they don't appear to line up with the upper mounting stud on the quadrant, of any of the gears, so I'm not going to drill that one in.

    Dan L
    Hi Dan,

    WOW what a great job through all the steps. Thanks so much for posting it!

    Is there any chance that the 1" hole you mention is an access hole for an oil can? The guard on my South Bend has two for that purpose so that's why I am asking.
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
      But I did want it to be easy to assemble and disassemble so I could use just the original four foot hose or the combination of the two for twelve feet. Here is what I came up with.

      This clip easily snaps on the ends of the two hoses and holds them together very well. It adds almost nothing to the diameter of the hose.

      With this simple clip I can join or separate the two hoses in just a few seconds. Here you can see the nice, long, twelve foot hose on my shop vacuum.

      It works like a charm. The combined hose acts like a single, longer hose. I used it on my track saw to cut the board that the vacuum and hose is resting on. I can leave the vacuum on the work bench and easily reach the work in the middle of the floor. And in just a few seconds the hoses can be disconnected and I am back to the original, four foot hose which is handy for many other situations. It is the best of both worlds. Not bad for $21.99, an old coat hanger, and a couple of hours of my time, including shopping for the hose.
      Hi Paul,

      Thanks for posting such a nice, simple solution. I don't have a similar need at the moment, but now I know where to find my way out of a similar problem when the situation arises.
      Best wishes to ya’ll.

      Sincerely,

      Jim

      "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

      "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

      Comment


      • Danl - Just Wow. Beautiful!
        "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

        Comment


        • Originally posted by jhe.1973 View Post
          Hi Dan,

          WOW what a great job through all the steps. Thanks so much for posting it!

          Is there any chance that the 1" hole you mention is an access hole for an oil can? The guard on my South Bend has two for that purpose so that's why I am asking.
          jhe.1973,

          That is possible, but my thought is that if I get oil on the spindle gear and some of the other gears on the quadrant, it will work its way to the remaining gears anyway.

          Removing that shroud on the Clausing takes seconds, so it is not an inconvenience. I thought about making it hinged somehow, but that would have added a lot to something that already ate up way too much of my time.

          Dan
          “All political power comes from the barrel of a gun. The communist party must command all the guns, that way, no guns can ever be used to command the party.” (Problems of War and Strategy, Nov 6 1938, published in “Selected Works of Mao Zedong,” 1965)

          Comment


          • Some years ago a company I did work for bought a big woodworking moulder and overhauled this, painted it and sold it for a lot of money.
            When they were loading it something went wrong and it fell off the truck and smashed one big end casting. We are talking quite big, something a 5 year old could hide in and it was nicely proportioned with all radiused corners.

            The idea was to see if it would all weld back together but being cast some had just exploded. So their fitter was tasked with making a new guard which he did out of 1/16" sheet metal.

            It was a disaster, it looked flimsy, it was flimsy, it wasn't even square, flat or even. The customer saw it and demanded his deposit back unless they came up with a decent S/H cover as there was no way a new one could be sourced.

            I got them to get me an 8 x4 sheet of 6mm plate and a length of 3" steam pipe, I torched and ground all the sheets out of the plate and cut the pipe into lenths then split each length with the torch and split it again to give me 90 degree curves.
            Then set about welding and grinding all this up. It looked great with all the 1 1/2" radii on the corners. When it was done had it powder coated and it actually looked better than new.

            Customer saw it and refused to believe it had been made until he was shown the inside where you could see how it had been achieved.

            Done the same since on covers for myself, smaller in 1/16" sheet and conduit for tubing all mig'ed up. If you use conduit or small pipe fittings you can even use the premade bends and slice them to get the tight radii.
            .

            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



            Comment


            • Beautiful replication, looks like it grew right on the machine!
              I like this very much.

              Comment


              • Two of the nicest projects pictured in this thread, one after the other. Polar opposites in a way - one the epitome of overbuilt but flawless, the other innate simplicity. Well done to both Paul and Dan.

                Comment


                • some simple stuff. The threading bar I needed to make to finish a chuck backplate, the flycutter I wanted but made because I screwed up a different project



                  [IMG]http://i1349.photobucket.com/albums/p752/mattthemuppet/IMG_4351_zpsprk40ukx.jpg/IMG]


                  although the finish on that block of scrap alu may look crap, it's actually pretty good for a drill press, collet chuck and HF XY vise!

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Danl View Post
                    After cutting another large holes and some final grinding and sanding, I
                    gave it a very thin coat of bondo and did some final sanding.

                    Next I put down a couple of coats of high solids primer and shot it with a
                    light coat of white to help spot trouble areas before final painting.

                    I used a high speed handheld grinder with a carbide burr to remove evidence
                    of welding burn through areas, and shot a coat of auto undercoating on the
                    inside. Not that it will help with the noise, but it does make it look a little
                    better.

                    Finally, a final coat of paint. Color not matched very closely, so I may try
                    to darken up the enamel a little with some black myself.


                    Obviously not an exact duplicate of the original, but fairly close. Most photos I see show another smaller (1"?) hole in back of the sliding gear, towards the headstock, but they don't appear to line up with the upper mounting stud on the quadrant, of any of the gears, so I'm not going to drill that one in.

                    Dan L
                    Very Nice ,Hats Off to factory looking finish.

                    Comment


                    • CCMT 0602 facing, turning and chamfering tool with 8x8mm shank:



                      Longer writeup:
                      http://gtwr.de/?page_id=372&lang=en

                      Stefan
                      Personal website

                      Comment


                      • Very neat work stefang.

                        Paul

                        Comment


                        • Stefan
                          Those are really nice, and would be very handy in my shop. Do you sell them? Does anyone?

                          Did you consider offsetting the screw hole toward the wall a little so that the insert is pulled tightly to the wall? I think most commercial screw-down-style holders are built this way. I think I would procure a tapered endmill to mill the wall so there is full contact with the insert relief face. Looks like I have a project if no one sells these holders commercially.

                          Regards,
                          RKlopp
                          Last edited by rklopp; 12-20-2015, 05:27 PM.

                          Comment


                          • I sold four of the holders within a few hours, now I only have one left for myself I didnt find anyone who makes a CCMT06 holder that can face, turn and 45° chamfers with a 8x8mm shank.

                            I offset the screw about 0,1mm towards the corner to do exactly what you described - If I ever make another run I will grind a 7° single flute cutter, but even the commercial ccmt06 holders I bought only have straight walls...but it would be a nice touch

                            Stefan
                            Personal website

                            Comment


                            • Those toolholders are great Stefan! I saw them on Instagram yesterday and immediately saved the pic for later reference. It's in a similar vein to what I did modifying an SCMCN toolholder back on page 215, to provide profile turning and facing on the same tool. Your photography is much better though

                              Funnily enough, I was watching some youtube videos of your Deckel G1L whilst trying to decide whether to throw away some money on one.

                              Comment


                              • I was making a 1/2" CCMT holder from the back side of a brazed carbide tool that was worn out. They machined nicely with carbide end mills, but HSS drill bits couldn't punch through for the hold down screw. DOH. Now I have to resharpen that tiny drill bit.
                                https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...dKMmNPWGNWWjVB

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X