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  • Originally posted by Boats69 View Post
    I needed to cut a thin, deep slot in aluminium. This little saw did the job - 15mm deep, 1.25mm wide. The ID of the saw is 6.5mm, OD 9.0mm.

    What does it do?

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    • It is a cable guide for Renault window winder, a coil spring fits in the slot and the narrow end fits in the drive mechanism:

      Click image for larger version

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      Last edited by Boats69; 10-24-2019, 01:32 PM. Reason: Replaced Photobucket links

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      • Made a single flute insert dovetail cutter, plans found on "Randy Richard's" youtube channel

        I think the steel was a once a 1967 Hillman Imp kingpin very hard indeed!, the insert is a TPGB 160403.

        Cuts very well indeed and leaves a very nice almost "shop bought" finish.









        Paul

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        • made a 13mm square socket from a piece of 1in hex to change the rear diff oil in my Subaru. Glad I did too, foul black stuff came out. Did the front as well (not quite as disgusting) and the CVT is next weekend.





          used my lathe to face both ends of the hex (one from the scrap yard, one from me hacksawing the chunk off), then cut a groove to the diagonal distance across the hex (18mm?). Hacksawed off the corners and squared things up on my "mill". Worked a treat!

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          • Well Damn?

            Originally posted by Westline View Post
            After seeing (can't remember where ) Someone surgesting to cutting pieces out of a old Circular saw blade to make cheap part off blades, I thought hey why not use the entire blade.

            I have no fondness of circular saw but this worked out better than I thought.
            I would love to have a slit saw and I can make my own arbour but the blades in South Africa are like $130 (I converted since nobody want to lookup the ZAR)
            Circular saw blade on the other hand is about $5 hence.


            I ran it at 125 RPM on Leaded steel and it came out pretty well.

            I did not want to push the brassed tungstan bits to much at it will jump off but on the size off the blade I should be able to run at 400rpm max.
            It makes bit of a noise but cuts a nice smooth 2.5mm wide slit.
            The only downside is it makes a V shaped bottom since it is a framing and ripping blade.
            I have to say during time first run I looked like this and I did not unpucker for a few hours.
            If you google carbide tipped metal cutting saw and look at pictures of the tips. Each tip has it's own profile. the first is cut one direction, the second has both corners cut off, the third is cut the opposite of the first. With a carefully made jig and a Silicon Carbide or Diamond grinder, Dremel tool or even a diamond file, you could easily modify the teeth to perform metal cutting operations. I can't say there wont be an inherent safety issue, however, it would cut better. I also believe some of the higher tooth count non-carbide circular saw blades are HSS. making one of those into a smaller diameter or using it full size might be a viable solution. I would suggest grinding the teeth down so the relief is only about 3-7 degrees and lots of cutting oil. I like your ingenuity, you must have a great big set of balls, or you are completely nuts, the question is left open.
            Equipping your machines with smaller handles makes them seem so much larger. They are also easier to operate with handcuffs on, should the need arise.

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            • A slightly unusual nut and spanner

              I made a drawbar for my Rockwell 11x42 lathe. The design I used has a fairly large nut on the end to tension the bar. So I made one. Since I'm having fun, I decided to make a nut that only a nut would make.



              Of course it needs a spanner.



              I rounded the end of the spanner using my rotary table on my Rong Fu mill drill. I built the fixture a while back. There is a scrap of masonite under the spanner stock so that I don't have to mill into the fixture.



              There is one good thing about having such an unusual spanner - I will never "borrow" it and take it out to where I am working on the tractor, etc. It's totally useless for anything other than the drawbar nut. On the other hand I'm going to be right annoyed if I lose it.

              Dan

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              • Yep, 7 sides makes a nutty nut.
                I hear and I forget.
                I see and I remember.
                I do and I understand.
                Confucius (孔夫子)

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                • ....Since I'm having fun, I decided to make a nut that only a nut would make.
                  So in that second to last picture which one looks the most like you?
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • Put another threaded hole behind your drill guide and you can hold smaller than 0.5"
                    Equipping your machines with smaller handles makes them seem so much larger. They are also easier to operate with handcuffs on, should the need arise.

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                    • Alright here goes my first post, I had to finally make an account because I'm proud of actually finishing a project of my ownall the way through.

                      I think it turned out great. The whole thing is only CRS and the jaws are case hardened. It will make a handy vise that can be used for welding or be set in a mill. Let me know what you think!

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                      • Welcome to the forum. That's a fine looking vise. It would be a shame to spatter it up by using it for welding.
                        Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                        • Good lookin' vise! No, it's too good to use for welding...

                          Congratulations!

                          Pete
                          1973 SB 10K .
                          BenchMaster mill.

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                          • Darn nice vise. Keep it for the mill don't get it splattered.

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                            • Only comment; way to fine a thread on the lead screw. If you need that much force you're doing something wrong. :-) It takes way to long to move the jaw.
                              ...lew...

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                              • Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
                                Only comment; way to fine a thread on the lead screw. If you need that much force you're doing something wrong. :-) It takes way to long to move the jaw.
                                ...lew...
                                I agree with that! The only things I'd change if I did it again would be hardening the base and going with 3/4-10 on the screw

                                Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

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