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  • I cloned my lathe wrench into a baby wrench so I could help dial in the 4 jaw. I also mounted a dial indicator on the tool post.


    I made a "cathead" to do short barrels, and a cap for the cathead to center the steady rest.


    I made a mandrel for an AR-15 barrel so it would reach my outboard spider. Then an aluminum bushing to pre-align the mandrel until it is captured by the spider bolts. I also made a tight fitting rod to pre-align the bore to the center line while I got the shim stock in place. AR-15 setups are quick now.

    Comment


    • Frank, I must say, I really enjoy your handmade, um, hand tools.

      Best,

      BW
      ---------------------------------------------------

      http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
      Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
      http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Ron of Va
        I also mounted a dial indicator on the tool post.

        That is a great idea!
        Andy

        Comment


        • Here is a simple one I finished last weekend, my Vise Jaws of "Doom":



          They're 24" long and span the 2 6" vises. Handy for certain kinds of jobs.

          Cheers,

          BW
          ---------------------------------------------------

          http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
          Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
          http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html

          Comment


          • Most of the tools I make are 100% functional and uglier than sin. I won't post their pictures. But there are a few that came out looking OK.

            I use my 4 jaw more than anything else. So I also made a shorty to spin the jaws in and out quickly. The knurled tube was in my scrap box. It was my first practice piece for knurling. It was press fit to the square piece.





            On a small lathe (7x12 import) there is not a lot of room for things. I found it a hassle to clear swarf from the cross-slide to fit the ubiquitous magnet mounted articulated DTI holder. I made several QCTP holders for my spare tools and ended up with one that was too small to hold a tool, so I drilled a hole in it and mounted a cheap miniature Noga knock-off arm. Now I can mount it directly to the QCTP and it's a breeze to adjust.






            Dan
            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

            Location: SF East Bay.

            Comment


            • Mic stand

              Not much here but fast and simple. Holds a one too six inch mic quite easily, drilled two holes to hold the telescoping calipers that I am using at the time.

              [IMG][/IMG]

              [IMG][/IMG]

              [IMG][/IMG]
              Last edited by digr; 02-02-2010, 04:15 PM.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by danlb
                On a small lathe (7x12 import) there is not a lot of room for things. I found it a hassle to clear swarf from the cross-slide to fit the ubiquitous magnet mounted articulated DTI holder. I made several QCTP holders for my spare tools and ended up with one that was too small to hold a tool, so I drilled a hole in it and mounted a cheap miniature Noga knock-off arm. Now I can mount it directly to the QCTP and it's a breeze to adjust.




                Dan
                Nice! Where did you get the Noga-clone?

                Comment


                • Punches for backing out broken screws

                  Way back when, a journeyman shared this tip with me.

                  Take a piece of drill rod, or another handy piece of round stock.

                  The larger ones are 3/8 and the smaller ones are 3/16.

                  Drill for 1/4 inch tap for the large ones.

                  Then drill 1/4 inch diameter by about 1/4 inch deep.

                  Tap with a good 1/4 inch tap.

                  Then use a dull 1/4 inch tap and bottom it out.

                  Then grind the square end to a sharp point as in the picture.

                  I have removed literally hundreds of broken bolts with these punches, at least if someone hadn't already tried to use a center punch on them.

                  Near the minor diameter of the thread I lightly punch a dimple in the broken bolt to give the punch something to grab onto.

                  Then tilt the punch and lightly tap it around till I could get a hold of it with a pliers or my fingers.

                  Of course the taps are brittle, so they chip sometimes and of course practice safety and wear safety glasses.

                  Any size tap will work, depending on the size of the bolt.

                  Brian

                  OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                  THINK HARDER

                  BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                  MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                  Comment


                  • Telescopic Wheel Dresser

                    This tool will save a lot of cranking the surface grinder down to dress the wheel and then back up to grind.

                    Just make sure you have it slightly to the left of the wheel so it won't grab.

                    Brian

                    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                    THINK HARDER

                    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                    Comment


                    • Tool holder holds Punch / Scribe
                      Shaft with sharp pin inserted in end slides in tool holder. Tapping with hammer will give center punch mark for laying out something like bolt hole pattern.



                      Pushing in on punch/scribe while moving saddle or cross-slide will draw lines.


                      Just a sliding fit of Punch/Scribe in tool holder

                      Comment


                      • Method of making insert pocket.

                        To make a hard to machine pocket such as this pointed diamond insert.
                        Machine pocket big enough that insert will fit in.
                        Oxidize the insert by overheating with something like oxy-acetylene torch.
                        Brass (silver solder or soft solder also) won’t stick to the oxidized surface.
                        Turn taper on socket head screw to match what is needed for insert. Drill and tap for hold down screw and screw insert into place.
                        Braze in the area need in the pocket trying not to over flow atop the insert.
                        This insert holder should have had more support under tip.



                        Just another idea on tool post indicator holder.
                        Have a lower leg that mounts under indicator.
                        Have post on bottom of indicator that is held in holder with enough friction that it can rotate.




                        Upper chip tray sits on saddle.
                        Sheet metal fastened atop cross-slide has angle bent down on chuck side and slide out chip tray has bent up side that fits in side space next to cross-slide.

                        Tray needs to be removed anytime chuck jaws or work extends enough for possible interference with tray.

                        Tray catches small parts that would normally fall in lower chip tray and makes for easier swarf clean up.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by BobWarfield
                          Here is a simple one I finished last weekend, my Vise Jaws of "Doom":



                          They're 24" long and span the 2 6" vises. Handy for certain kinds of jobs.

                          Cheers,

                          BW
                          Bob,
                          I have a few sets of vise jaws similar to these, up to 28" long. I cut the movable jaw side in the middle so the two vises can work independently when tightening, it makes them much easier to use.
                          Mark Hockett

                          Comment


                          • Here is a live chuck.. It is a four inch four jaw mounted on a 3mt shank and some tapered roller bearings..







                            Precision takes time.

                            Comment


                            • Shop made bender





                              Shop made picket twister



                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                              Comment


                              • The basis for the bender was a piece of scrap H beam that was already cut on both ends at the angle you see. A few hours work with an angle grinder cleaned it up nice. To copy it you would need a big drill press (which I have) or you would have to build it up from plate.

                                If you want to copy the bender drop on down this way after breakup. Just let me know a couple of days in advance.
                                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                                Comment

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