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  • Arbor press. Wow.
    Just wow!

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    • Those are beautiful tools showing pride in workmanship. I wish my high school had offered a good shop class.
      Jim

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      • http://s12.postimg.org/fd8fa35ul/P1010001.jpg
        Last edited by zago; 03-25-2017, 01:28 PM. Reason: foto

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        • Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
          Just make sure to gently tap the disks into the jaws to keep the spider from moving around.
          That is exactly how I handle spiders in the shop - I keep tapping them with a hammer until they stop moving around.

          I look forward to seeing more of your tools.

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          • One of my fathers creations for his clock making - Mini tailstock steady rest that can be used with or without a center


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            • That mini tailstock steady is just plain GENIUS!
              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

              Location: SF East Bay.

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              • [/IMG]

                Not the prettiest looking thing but I made the tool rest for this old bench grinder I acuired. The slides were made with a water jet but the rest on my home mill. It's a slower speed grinder 1725 rpm perfect for the Scotch Brite wheel on the other end . Gonna eventually make some guards for how unsafe this thing looks . I'd also have to say for how old this thing looks it's the queitess grinder I've ever used

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                • Originally posted by tbsrokks05 View Post
                  [/IMG]

                  Not the prettiest looking thing but I made the tool rest for this old bench grinder I acuired. The slides were made with a water jet but the rest on my home mill. It's a slower speed grinder 1725 rpm perfect for the Scotch Brite wheel on the other end . Gonna eventually make some guards for how unsafe this thing looks . I'd also have to say for how old this thing looks it's the queitess grinder I've ever used
                  Dang that looks like a washing machine motor. The only thing is it has shafts out both ends. It does look homemade.


                  Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                  • Home made 50 Ton H-Frame Press.


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                    • Originally posted by jimmyj View Post
                      Home made 50 Ton H-Frame Press.


                      I'm using tapatalk and those photos are broken? I'd love to see it.

                      Galaxy S4, Slimkat
                      If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing

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                      • Lookin good jimmyj. Nice work. Makes my home made press look low rent.
                        “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                        Lewis Grizzard

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                        • Hi Challenger...not sure if it will help, but here are the direct links:

                          https://s5.postimg.org/sil9j4ahj/IMG_3960.jpg

                          https://s5.postimg.org/8p95qex3r/IMG_3969.jpg

                          Regards, Jim

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                          • Here's a picture of the 5C collet adapter I started about 15 years ago and finally finished up last month. I meant to post then but other things came up and I moved onto them for a while. But better lathe than never, right?



                            My spindle has a MT5 taper and I could have made a slip in adapter. But I chose to use a screw on extended adapter because the design of my lathe with the gap bed and filler does not allow me to get close enough to the end of the spindle. I would have needed to live with a seriously unsupported carriage only about 2/3's onto the bed and even then the compound would need to have been extended more than I prefer. So I opted for a screw on adapter that extends some way out into the work area in a manner similar to the length of a normal chuck. You can see how in this picture of the adapter fitted to the lathe how the carriage is just starting to move past the end of the bedway.



                            The body is in two parts TIG welded together because I was working with the metals I had and I was learning to TIG weld all at the same time. So it seemed like a natural to TIG the piece of heavy wall stock and the slug of suitable size bar stock together then turn the features. You can see the bead in the picture.

                            The mount to the spindle was turned first then the hole for the collet was done with the adapter screws onto the spindle. This resulted in no detectable runout or variations I could see from remounting and testing with a half thou DTI after four remounts. So I'm happy enough with that. But I did take some care to ensure that the adapter screws on with a good but free turning fit to the threads and a light drag on the registration pilot of the spindle. So that helped a lot.

                            After that it was drill and bore and then I used a brake hone to polish to the final fit. I got it close enough that I was only removing the crests of the last pass of the boring bar to achieve a slop free slip fit. In fact I'm so close that some of my collets are just far enough out that they need a light bump from a block of wood to slide in and out. So I really should relieve it a touch more.

                            The taper angle for the compound was taken from a collet sitting in that snug bore before I honed for some slippage.

                            The drawbar is made in three parts due to lack of stock of the right size. The threaded end to go on the collet tails and the hand wheel are separate from the skimmed Sch40 pipe used for the longer middle piece. This was also a trial to see how well Loctite 680 performs with the joint overlaps being a slight push fit and about 3/4" long. So far so good and I have not been gentle with it. I'm rather impressed with the product so far.

                            And the G wrench is a shop made tool as well to tighten the adapter to the spindle and the hand wheel is the same OD as the larger portion of the adapter and has four holes in the pads to use with this G wrench as well.
                            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                            • I like that 5 C adaptor a lot especially the way it projects the part forward giving you more longitudinal movement of the apron.

                              EDIT: Is the concentricity remaining consistent after you tear it down completely and then re-set it up?
                              Last edited by DATo; 04-06-2017, 06:53 AM.

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                              • Originally posted by DATo View Post
                                I like that 5 C adaptor a lot especially the way it projects the part forward giving you more longitudinal movement of the apron.

                                EDIT: Is the concentricity remaining consistent after you tear it down completely and then re-set it up?
                                I wondered that same thing, BC. Excellent work. Does the black part of the welded assembly have any taper at all to fit inside your MT5 tapered spindle?

                                Dan
                                Salem, Oregon

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