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  • Thanks guys.

    After it was done I wondered the same thing. I mounted and checked with the half thou DTI four times to check. I was more than pleased and a little surprised that it was no worse than a needle's width of wandering during any of the four mountings. The time I took to nail the register fits must have paid off.

    It only mounts on the threaded stub and the registration collar and shoulder. Nothing goes into the 5MT taper at all. The drawbar runs up through the spindle instead. It screws onto the outside of the collet thread so that takes up a lot of room in the spindle bore and there would not have been room for a tail to fit into the MT.

    DATo, I would have been quite happy if I could have gotten away with a shorter protrusion. Less overhang is always better after all. But as you saw in the second picture if I'd made it shorter I'd have gotten into other issues with the overhang. And if I'd made it so the collet face was right at the end of the spindle then the cutter would not have had a direct vertical line down to the bed. And that's would be far worse than a bit of overhang on the adapter.

    I have not actually used it for making any parts yet. After this was done I had some model airplanes to prep for the upcoming season and some little mechanical jobs to do for the club that only needed some wrenching. But I'M READY! ! ! !
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • A coworker asked for a tool to disassemble 90 degree die grinder heads. His second job is being a maintenance man in a factory. They remove the spindles from these grinders and replace them with something else (not sure what). He tried removing the spindle nut and broke the housing (can be seen in the photos). I took the grinder home and made the pin spanner to fit. I gave him instructions on how to harden it. It's not tool steel, but from experience I know it will harden it enough to create a little bit of durability.





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      • You ever run into a situation where someone pressed a bearing into a blind hole?

        Me neither... but I swapped some tutoring for a train and things changed. Been making all kinds of new tools for things I never knew I needed to do (or shouldn't need to do).

        Thus







        Basically, I just turned a chunk of steel, one end that would go through and one that would not, threaded it, then used an angle grinder with a cut off disk to do the slots... yeah, quick and dirty. Not shooting for the Pretty Tool of the Day award.

        In use, squeeze the slotted end together, tap it through the bearing, and then thread the bolt through. The bolt will spread the squeezed together end such that it can't go back through the bearing and, eventually, the end of the bolt will hit bottom and press out the bearing. Vice grips to stop it from turning... too lazy to mill flats. Worked well, and should last the 8 that I need to do.

        Well, of course I changed my mind and decided to make new bearing blocks anyway, so I didn't really need to do this... but that's just the way it's been going the last while.

        David...
        http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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        • Nice solution to your problem, Dave.

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          • one trick i learned from my uncle( car mechanic) you pack hole in bearing with greese,no bubles are best. then you take shaft that fits bearing(loosly but not much) and hit it with hammer. hydraulic presure of the grease should push bearing out.
            Originally posted by fixerdave View Post
            You ever run into a situation where someone pressed a bearing into a blind hole?

            Me neither... but I swapped some tutoring for a train and things changed. Been making all kinds of new tools for things I never knew I needed to do (or shouldn't need to do).

            Thus







            Basically, I just turned a chunk of steel, one end that would go through and one that would not, threaded it, then used an angle grinder with a cut off disk to do the slots... yeah, quick and dirty. Not shooting for the Pretty Tool of the Day award.

            In use, squeeze the slotted end together, tap it through the bearing, and then thread the bolt through. The bolt will spread the squeezed together end such that it can't go back through the bearing and, eventually, the end of the bolt will hit bottom and press out the bearing. Vice grips to stop it from turning... too lazy to mill flats. Worked well, and should last the 8 that I need to do.

            Well, of course I changed my mind and decided to make new bearing blocks anyway, so I didn't really need to do this... but that's just the way it's been going the last while.

            David...

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Kolacek View Post
              one trick i learned from my uncle( car mechanic) you pack hole in bearing with greese,no bubles are best. then you take shaft that fits bearing(loosly but not much) and hit it with hammer. hydraulic presure of the grease should push bearing out.
              I've heard of that but didn't think to try it. Then again, with the amount of locktite on these, I have my doubts it would have worked. Actually sheared a 1/4" bolt doing one today. Had to thread the topside of the puller thing, spin on a nut, and use a slide hammer to get the works out. Eventually resorted to heat. My understanding is that the bearings are actually supposed to be stuck on the shaft but able to move back and forth in that hole. But, on the bright side, I actually got to use my new left-handed drill bits. Actually worked

              I still have 4 to go. I'll try the grease trick on the next one and report back. It might even save the bearing. Thanks for the reminder,

              David...
              http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

              Comment


              • Originally posted by fixerdave View Post
                I've heard of that but didn't think to try it. Then again, with the amount of locktite on these, I have my doubts it would have worked. Actually sheared a 1/4" bolt doing one today. Had to thread the topside of the puller thing, spin on a nut, and use a slide hammer to get the works out. Eventually resorted to heat. My understanding is that the bearings are actually supposed to be stuck on the shaft but able to move back and forth in that hole. But, on the bright side, I actually got to use my new left-handed drill bits. Actually worked

                I still have 4 to go. I'll try the grease trick on the next one and report back. It might even save the bearing. Thanks for the reminder,

                David...
                That grease trick can work, but please be careful. If it finds a small hole it can squirt out a stream of grease that could hit you in the eyes if not wearing glasses. It might be a good idea to lay a towel around the shaft before giving it the heavy hammer blow.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by tom_d View Post
                  That grease trick can work, but please be careful. If it finds a small hole it can squirt out a stream of grease that could hit you in the eyes if not wearing glasses. It might be a good idea to lay a towel around the shaft before giving it the heavy hammer blow.
                  Wear a glove. I had the grease shoot back and injected into my hand. Hurt like hell, got infected and really hurt like hell.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
                    Wear a glove. I had the grease shoot back and injected into my hand. Hurt like hell, got infected and really hurt like hell.
                    aw, what I have heard the grease/oil injections get really badly infected easily causing necrosis and amputations.
                    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                    • The most recent video of Ave on YouTube shows this trick.
                      Peter

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                      • Thanks for the caution tips on grease for bearing removal. I had no idea.
                        Maybe there is a safer substance for hydraulic bearing removal. I'm thinking grease is used because it's convenient?

                        Galaxy S4, Slimkat
                        If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by houtenkrullen View Post
                          The most recent video of Ave on YouTube shows this trick.
                          Peter
                          Link for the lazy folks

                          https://youtu.be/w62c4NQDwP0?t=337

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by challenger View Post
                            Thanks for the caution tips on grease for bearing removal. I had no idea.
                            Maybe there is a safer substance for hydraulic bearing removal. I'm thinking grease is used because it's convenient?

                            Galaxy S4, Slimkat
                            If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing
                            Wet toilet paper

                            Comment


                            • I saw a video where the person used mashed up paper towels and wet and worked better then the grease.
                              Ed
                              Agua Dulce, So.California
                              1950 F1 street rod
                              1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
                              1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
                              1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
                              1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

                              Comment


                              • I/we use Plasticine at work for getting out bushings. Works great, easy to clean up. Reusable too. Grease works, but it's just too damn messy. Hell, water works too if your pin's a nice and tight slide fit.

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