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  • Hexagonal collet block for Stark 4S collets. I wanted a collet block but wasn't willing to purchase a whole set of either 5C or ER collets to get one. I had the beat up hex stock and it was the perfect size for the job. The nut was a challenge. The threads on my 4S collets are in varying states of wear, the smallest o.d. was .894" and the largest .898". Some research led me to a minor diameter of .848" and an initial feed on the compound (30deg) of .037". I kept taking light cuts until the most worn collet screwed in and then took a little more so the least worn collet was a hair away from being snug. Total feed on the compound ended up being .050".

    *sorry, pics removed so I don't get banned from Imgur.*
    Last edited by Tim Aldrich; 09-07-2017, 03:49 AM.

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    • Nice. I've done the same thing with my 3C collets.

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      • I made a fixture for stamping around the OD of round parts. My immediate need for this is the knee support nut on the Trent Pinion Mill, as I really don't want to freehand the numbers for the graduations.

        With a tall spacer block placed on the base, this could also be used for guiding stamps on flat work. In the photo there is a plastic vee block fitted to the adjusting screw, that should fit the part I need to stamp. I anticipate making more of these as the need arises. I left the column quite tall to accommodate the addition of a vertically adjustable work support shaft mounted horizontally, to better support work with a relatively thin outer section and avoid deformation. When/if I need to make another graduated ring for a zero-able handwheel, I expect I'll mill a slot vertically through the column to fit the aforementioned support fixture.

        I'm proud of this one, strictly from the standpoint of making something in an expedient, practical manner. I used welds for permanent joins, didn't hand finish anything beyond deburring, and didn't machine any surfaces that did not require it. I planned on using store bought fasteners for everything, but in the end I was stymied by my somewhat arbitrary choice of #8-36 threads for locking the knee (or whatever you'd call it) to the base. #8-36 screws of any kind were unobtainable locally, which really surprised me. Even Fastenal didn't stock them. Had I realized that would be the case I would have used coarse thread instead. So I ended up making a pair of locking screws as you see in the photo, rather than wait for some to show up in the mail. They look very pretty, and that's only thanks to the scrap material used to make them. It was some kind of magnetic shafting that turned like an absolute dream. I cut them dry, with HSS, in a big hurry, and they just refused to not come out beautiful. I'd love to find out what that stuff is and buy some of it, haha.

        It will be interesting to see how many of my seat-of-the-pants dimensions and design choices I will regret as I use the thing. Without a bunch of time sunk into making it pretty, I don't feel bad about hacking and slashing at it to change things up if necessary.

        One last item of note, the welds around the base of the column were done by my buddy, who was wanting an excuse to practice his TIG welding. Good thing, too, otherwise they'd look like I did them.

        Max
        http://joyofprecision.com/

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        • Mars, that is a lovely job! I really like the range of adjustments that are built in to allow it to be used later for a wider variety of pieces.

          I suspect that unless you are stamping aluminium that the plastic "V" will be too soft. A steel saddle cut to the same radius as the part then padded with a brass, copper or even aluminium shim would reflect the impact back more and produce a sharper indent with less force being needed. But other than this one niggle it looks really nice.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            Mars, that is a lovely job! I really like the range of adjustments that are built in to allow it to be used later for a wider variety of pieces.

            I suspect that unless you are stamping aluminium that the plastic "V" will be too soft. A steel saddle cut to the same radius as the part then padded with a brass, copper or even aluminium shim would reflect the impact back more and produce a sharper indent with less force being needed. But other than this one niggle it looks really nice.
            Thanks, and I agree. My immediate use will be the brass knee support nut of the Trent Pinion Mill. So far all handwheels I've done have been either brass or aluminum. I expect I'll end up with all manner of support pieces of different shapes and materials as the years go on. Unless, of course, it turns out this thing doesn't work and I scrap it. Lol.

            Sent from my BLN-L24 using Tapatalk
            Max
            http://joyofprecision.com/

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            • Beautiful design and execution.
              On screw sizes, 2-56, 4-40, 6-32, 8-32, 10-32, 10-24 are common. No 5 and fine thread in the smaller sizes, not so much.

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              • Mars

                Nice job, I always enjoy your work.
                If for some reason you have to much spring in your stamping guide, you might leave the base (the anvil) solid . Than make the guide, that holds the stamp, adjustable. Let us know how it works.

                Hal

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                • Dang Mars, that looks great.

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                  • The Mars Red version of GHT's Universal Pillar Tool....
                    Beautifully conceived and made as per usual.

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                    • Originally posted by Hal View Post
                      Mars

                      Nice job, I always enjoy your work.
                      If for some reason you have to much spring in your stamping guide, you might leave the base (the anvil) solid . Than make the guide, that holds the stamp, adjustable. Let us know how it works.

                      Hal
                      Hal, that's a really good idea and if there's any one single thing that causes me to re-make the tool, that would probably be it. There is about 1.5 inches of thread engagement with the adjusting screw, so I'm hoping it will be ok as-is. I will definitely let everyone know how it works.

                      Originally posted by thaiguzzi View Post
                      The Mars Red version of GHT's Universal Pillar Tool....
                      Beautifully conceived and made as per usual.
                      Haha thanks very much! I really want to build the UPT, maybe I'll save up for the casting kit when I finish up the Trent.

                      I should probably make a storage box for the stamping fixture. Think I'll take this opportunity to complain about having to make boxes, once again. LOL. I still haven't made a box for the mini tailstock turret. Or the mini boring head.
                      Max
                      http://joyofprecision.com/

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                      • Max,

                        A similar problem and slightly different solution.



                        Biggest difference is that mine isn't as good looking.

                        Beyond that I've got a couple flat spring crowders on the number stamp slot to make sure they're in the same location if I hit them again. To that point, the holder can be lifted up to check the impression and give it another whack if that looks helpful. I usually tap a light impression, check the location and rotate a little if necessary. There's a little reference line on the face behind the dial that I can use to locate. The up/down position isn't as handy. Most dials are in the range of 1-1/8" - 1-1/2". For larger ones I've had to tap another hole down lower. Otherwise I've got an assortment of spud mandrels for different hole sizes. There's a small left/right adjustment at the pivot that's not really any help. The fore and aft movement is more important as you've provided for.

                        The actual number stamps have been a royal pain. They're never centered well on the shanks. I corresponded with one manufacturer who just suggested buying the other style, the ones intended to assemble several in a holder. (They're something like $18 per stamp and short and narrow so might mean a new fixture.) I found a sale once, bought a couple extra sets and sorted them out for the best vertical centering. Sideways is easily adapted for but the up/down positioning at each strike would just be a PITA. Two in my "master set" are a little off but it's not really obvious in the end.

                        It's always nice to see your work.
                        .
                        "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                        • The other day I was installing some new rubber feet to my mill table. Had to make 16 M12 threads in 10mm thick steel with a quite dull tap, it was a nightmare. So I decided not to deal with it any more and make some threadmilling cutters. Took an HSS end mill and turned it with an internal threading tool. A Little bit of burr but the test cut worked perfect so I made them for several pitches.



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                          • So you're cutting threads on a HSS endmill using the boring tool & a threading cycle in a CNC mill? If so, who'da thunk it!
                            Milton

                            "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                            "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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                            • Originally posted by DEVILHUNTER View Post
                              ... make some threadmilling cutters. ...
                              I get the concept behind thread milling, but not the subtleties. For instance, I can see that a tap style threading tool would be faster that a single point, but is there another advantage?

                              Thanks,
                              Bob

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                              • Almost DICKEYBIRD, I did not used a threading cycle because I did not cut a thread, I cut grooves. On a thread milling tool you have rings instad of an helix, otherwise you would just have a rougher end mill.

                                Multi flute thread milling is faster than a tap since it can make all the threads un one pass. Also you don't need a machine capable of rigid tapping. You can thread to the very botom of a blind flat hole. If the tool breaks you can take it out right away since is smaller than the hole. You can make any size thread, internal or external, of this pitch, so you save on tools. Single "ring" tools can also make any pitch, but they are way slower. Finally you can adjust the fit on your thread. You can even use the same tool to chamfer the hole.

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