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  • Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
    I get the concept behind thread milling, but not the subtleties. For instance, I can see that a tap style threading tool would be faster that a single point, but is there another advantage?

    Thanks,
    Bob
    Able to machine different class threads very reliably.

    Multiple different size threaded hole in the same part with one tool i.e. a 32 pitch tool can cut a 6-32, 8-32, and 10-32 threaded hole in a part all with one tool. Of course single point tools can cut more than one pitch.

    Chip control with a lot of tapped holes can be easier to control. I always watch taps like a hawk when running longer cycles with a lot of holes, sometimes you get chips wound up that can cause a broken tap if not paying attention.

    Difficult or hardened materials is easier to threadmill than tap.

    The downside is it might take a couple holes to really dial in a threadmill process and get it perfect. Good taps are much more fool proof, and unless you are doing a whole bunch of oddball sizes, in huge quantities, a good quality tap of the proper type for what you are tapping will suit you just fine.

    Then there's form taps....

    Comment


    • Early this past week Tim Aldrich posted a Hexagonal collet block that he had made. It got me thinking (very dangerous condition) that maybe I could make one from a old chunk of Hex shaft I have had in my bin for years. My mill used R8 collates. the piece of shaft I had was 1.5 inches diameter by 4.3 inches long which turns out to be just enough to except a R8 collet.
      Next problem is although I have some larger drill bits, nothing between 7/8 and 1" none was long enough to drill a .9495 hole 3.8" deep. I have a long 9/16 bit, so after the battle of getting the hex bar centered in my 4 jaw chuck, I through drill a 9/16 hole.
      Next problem was, I didn't have a boring bar that was ridged or long enough for the job. So after digging through my stuff I came up with a piece of 5/8 tool steel and a small carbide insert of mystery descent from somewhere. Took a little time but after searching on google I came up with a design for the boring bar.
      The boring bar work supprizunly well after a few tweaks and I might have to figure what insert I used and get some spares.
      The whole project was fun and a great learning experience, so I thought I would share it with you. It's a little rough, but I don't plan on letting NASA use it, so it should be ok.

      Last edited by lugnut; 09-11-2017, 03:54 AM.
      _____________________________________________

      I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
      Oregon Coast

      Comment


      • Very nice block!! I've a couple of chunks waiting that conversion but for ER32..

        Pete
        1973 SB 10K .
        BenchMaster mill.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by DEVILHUNTER View Post
          The other day I was installing some new rubber feet to my mill table. Had to make 16 M12 threads in 10mm thick steel with a quite dull tap, it was a nightmare. So I decided not to deal with it any more and make some threadmilling cutters. Took an HSS end mill and turned it with an internal threading tool. A Little bit of burr but the test cut worked perfect so I made them for several pitches.
          Thats pretty bold move to cut HSS endmills like that
          I'd imagine that the resulting geometry is bit off but have to admit that this thread milling geometry gets me confused.
          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

          Comment


          • Originally posted by 10KPete View Post
            Very nice block!! I've a couple of chunks waiting that conversion but for ER32..

            Pete
            that's what I did, but with ER25





            actually, it's a collet chuck for my Atlas 618, but I've used it a bunch as a collet block too. Sometimes even turning something down on the lathe then unscrewing the chuck and milling the piece (eg. a chuck key). It's been surprisingly handy, way more than I thought it would. Even made a rotary broach with it, though sadly my broacher didn't work.

            Comment


            • I have a ER32 R8 collet set that will work on the one I made.
              _____________________________________________

              I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
              Oregon Coast

              Comment


              • Originally posted by lugnut View Post
                Early this past week Tim Aldrich posted a Hexagonal collet block that he had made. It got me thinking (very dangerous condition) that maybe I could make one from a old chunk of Hex shaft I have had in my bin for years. My mill used R8 collates. the piece of shaft I had was 1.5 inches diameter by 4.3 inches long which turns out to be just enough to except a R8 collet.
                Next problem is although I have some larger drill bits, nothing between 7/8 and 1" none was long enough to drill a .9495 hole 3.8" deep. I have a long 9/16 bit, so after the battle of getting the hex bar centered in my 4 jaw chuck, I through drill a 9/16 hole.
                Next problem was, I didn't have a boring bar that was ridged or long enough for the job. So after digging through my stuff I came up with a piece of 5/8 tool steel and a small carbide insert of mystery descent from somewhere. Took a little time but after searching on google I came up with a design for the boring bar.
                The boring bar work supprizunly well after a few tweaks and I might have to figure what insert I used and get some spares.
                The whole project was fun and a great learning experience, so I thought I would share it with you. It's a little rough, but I don't plan on letting NASA use it, so it should be ok.

                Is it just the picture angle, or is that actually an octagonal block, not hex? (Hex = 6, Oct = 8) I've been wanting an octagonal block for my set but haven't got around to making one yet, nice work.

                Edit - normally I remove pictures from quotes, but thought it appropriate in this case, hope no one minds.

                Comment


                • My Bad, every one was talking Hex, and thats what I had on my brain, it's Octagonal.
                  _____________________________________________

                  I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                  Oregon Coast

                  Comment


                  • Nice collet block, lugnut. I thinks that's the first time I inspired anything around here

                    Comment


                    • Thanks Tim, some times it only takes the simplest of things to give someone an idea. I've been thinking about a collet block for some time and your post reminded me of the Octagonal chunk of steel I had in the bin,
                      _____________________________________________

                      I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                      Oregon Coast

                      Comment


                      • This is a copyish of a bender someone posted here before years ago. It is simple but works so well! Two piston pins, some scrap metal and a guy has a bender.



                        Andy

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                        • Nice!

                          Comment


                          • Andy, how do you hold the part while forming the bends on the part shown?
                            North Central Arkansas

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by ulav8r View Post
                              Andy, how do you hold the part while forming the bends on the part shown?
                              One the vise? At least that's what I can see in the photo.
                              Helder Ferreira
                              Setubal, Portugal

                              Comment


                              • I expect the flat tab welded to the lower roller is set so its surface would be tangent to the cylinder. That way, the stock to be bent will be clamped in the vise simultaneously with the bending fixture and will itself be tangent to the roller. Then it's only a matter of rolling them over to the desired angle.
                                .
                                "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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