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  • Made a grinder rest from some angle scrap this weekend. Works pretty well so far. Needs a few more accessories for wheel dressing, and grinding chisels, etc.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

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    • Yup! I like it!

      TC
      I cut it off twice; it's still too short
      Oregon, USA

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      • Picked up some slitting saws at the local home box store. They're cheap ($8 I think) Tool Shop brand, but they were labeled as being high speed steel. The package contained an assortment of diameters, thicknesses and tooth counts. It also came with an "arbor" and I think the whole thing was aimed at the Dremel crowd. But what the heck. If I can slot a few screws it would be worth the expenditure. I made a proper arbor which is .075" diameter and a nominal 2 7/8" in length. Also made the #8-32 bolt. I've only made one cut so far and the blade (pictured) survived. The South Bend was used for turning the blank to diameter and then parting the cap off. The old Stark lathe was used for the rest of it. A collet block and the bench mill made the hex head of the bolt.



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        • Love the grinder rests. I really need to make up a half dozen along the same lines to replace the craptastic ones on my own grinders.

          Did one a few years ago that uses some square tubing as a receiver to accept a regular rest along with a bunch of others intended for grinding wood working tools and turning gouges. It worked well other than the slip sizes of tubing didn't slip so well when fouled up with grinding dust. And I've got a Tormek wet grinder for the woodworking tools and general knife sharpening now anyway. So doing a few "self draining" rests like yours seems like a great option.

          Need to do a new slitting saw arbor too. But I want to make it a direct R-8 shank because I want it to extend down around 3 inches off the spindle nose.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • I made a proper arbor which is .075" diameter and a nominal 2 7/8" in length. Also made the #8-32 bolt.
            You can countersink the retaining cap (while making it much thinner) and use a csnk cup-head bolt, to get a much smaller clearance on the underside. For sure, a csnk cuphead cannot be tightened as much as a full-sized hex-head bolt, but in practice I found I did not need much torque.

            I also found that my slitting saws were best run at quite low revs, with an air blast on the exit side to clear any chips away. Recutting swarf is bad, but doing it with a 0.040" saw is even worse!

            Cheers
            Roger

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            • Or run a longer bolt from other side.

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              • Or make the stub on the cap longer & thread it, turning the cap itself into a bolt.

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                • Or make the stub on the cap longer & thread it, turning the cap itself into a bolt.
                  I tried that. With a shallow stub it can be very hard gripping it sufficiently to do it up tight enough. Bolt was simple.

                  Cheers
                  Roger

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                  • Drill two holes through the face of the flange to fit a pin spanner, make a spanner if you don't have a suitable one.

                    Look up Frank Ford's version of a slitting saw holder.
                    Last edited by J Harp; 10-24-2017, 11:10 AM. Reason: Add a reference.
                    Jim

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                    • Three tap holder/handles. Inspired by flyboyJim and Frank Ford. I wanted a countersink in the end for a follower and a tommy bar hole. These are for 1/4" thru #4 taps. About 1/2" diameter, 2" long, with a step&file taper.
                      [IMG][/IMG]
                      Thanks guys, JFLingg
                      JFLingg @ 25 miles east of Colorado Springs, Colorado

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                      • The foot long bit holder, set screws are 1/8" long, #8-32. Handle is from a camera tripod tilt/pan. Rivet holding hex & handle is about .1" at most. Hex stock was originally tapped both ends for something; one end was retapped 1/4"x20, the other end drilled out to hold the drive bits with two set screws on the bit hex flat sides.



                        JFLingg
                        JFLingg @ 25 miles east of Colorado Springs, Colorado

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                        • neat job and recycling
                          Pete

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                          • Pin Wrench for 5C Collet Block Nut.

                            Here is a pin wrench that I made to tighten the collet nuts on 5C block sets. It's made from 304 stainless steel and uses a 1/4-20 socket head set screw with a dog bone end turned on it. Using my Oxy-Acetylene torch, it was bent around a 1-5/8" mandrel that I turned in my lathe. It works great!

                            I looked around and most sellers want at least $20 for a pin wrench and they aren't specific for the 5C collet nuts which have four .200 holes in them.

                            By the way, these pictures are hosted on a site that I found, IMBB.com. It's easy to use. The only issue is that they limit you to 16 MB total. It would be OK if you don't post many photos and keep the sizes down. The site is very easy to use.



                            Last edited by GNM109; 11-01-2017, 06:26 PM.

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                            • Nice job on that.
                              A question though. It seems like all the material past the pin is not necessary as the pin carries the load. I believe it also may work a little better if the pin was farther out along the curve towards the tip. Where the pin is now I would think that maybe the pin gets levered out of the hole. If it was farther out the strap would wrap down on the nut holding the pin into the hole.

                              Then again I could be completely wrong!

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                              • Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
                                Nice job on that.
                                A question though. It seems like all the material past the pin is not necessary as the pin carries the load. I believe it also may work a little better if the pin was farther out along the curve towards the tip. Where the pin is now I would think that maybe the pin gets levered out of the hole. If it was farther out the strap would wrap down on the nut holding the pin into the hole.

                                Then again I could be completely wrong!
                                Hi.
                                There's very little strain on the the wrench in use. I've used it several times in the past few days and it works well. The threads on the end of the 5C collets are 20TPI and it takes very little movement to seat a workpiece in the collet with the wrench.

                                The benefit of the half-round design is that the wrench slips over the nut and it's easy to locate the pin into any of the four holes in the collet nut. The pin is a close fit in the hole with about .005 clearance and it won't slip.

                                Most of the pin wrenches I've seen are close to half round with a hinge in the curved piece. I'm sure that it would work as well the way you mention, though.

                                Thanks for your comment.

                                Here is a picture of the inside of the curve with the pin. The stainless arm is really quite sturdy.

                                Last edited by GNM109; 11-01-2017, 11:35 PM.

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