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  • Freshly hatched. Proud parents look on from above.


    Still have 2 sticks I cut dovetails on that need to be turned into some boring bar holders, and more toolbit holders etc. It's taken me over 2 years since I cut the dovetails to get to this point, so there's no need to rush into things......

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    • That sounds like my sort of timeframe for a project!
      I don't think you've made a faithful copy of the originals though... they look much nicer!

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      • Thanks. Considering they came from a bent piece of 2"x2"x3' of mystery metal that I dug up from the ground at a farm auction, they turned out pretty good. You never know what's hiding in a piece of material

        I was pretty curious just when I started these actually so I checked my amazon purchase history. I bought the dovetail cutters for these on aug 5 2014...... Talk about a long term project (My guess of 2 years was WAY off) Maybe it's my woodworking background where I'm used to letting wood acclimatize and stabilize to the environment first

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        • Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
          ... Maybe it's my woodworking background where I'm used to letting wood acclimatize and stabilize to the environment first
          Same principle. You are aging the steel to allow it to release any built up internal stresses before continuing.
          Last edited by RichR; 04-27-2018, 02:16 PM. Reason: Grammar
          Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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          • You never know what's hiding in a piece of material
            Like the sculptor said : "You just take a piece of marble and cut away everything that does not look like a beautiful woman."
            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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            • And, here's some more holders today....
              Before blackening

              All rigged up for battle



              And as close as I'll ever get to understanding blockchain.....

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              • These are the bare sticks I started from. I still have the big one on the right. Next weeks project.......maybe

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                • Nice work Dan.

                  Somewhat of a side note - how do you like those boring bars pictured above, particularly the thinner one? I've got a few of that style, but they almost always sing and vibrate a bit, while others I have (like the brazed carbide) cut whispery smooth. Have you figured out any trick to get those to cut smoothly?

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                  • Originally posted by RichR View Post
                    Same principle. You are aging the steel to allow it to release any built up internal stresses before continuing.
                    I've clearly got that 5 O'clock Friday feeling but when he said it was dug up, I was thinking wine and poncy TV hosts talking about terroir.

                    Dan: are you blessed with a surface grinder or have you lapped or sanded those for that finish?

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                    • To be honest I haven't used them yet (or any of the pictured inserted tooling shown). I bought from banggood, and figured they were cheap enough to take a chance for home use. We've got a 1/2" bar at work that takes those inserts CCMT, and it works well. I don't have high hopes for the smallest bar being very good at all. Although it might do better with positive CCGT inserts. I laughed when I took it out of the sleeve and seen the length, and pictured somebody trying to use it hanging out that far . I've got quite a few other little bars, either brazed, solid carbide, and HSS, so I'm pretty set for most of my boring needs. I bought the set mainly for the 12mm as I'm pretty sure that one will work fine. I like the one at work much better than 1/2" brazed bars. The other 2 were a bonus. I think the 3 bars (7, 10, 12) with 10 inserts was around $20 or something.

                      Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                      Dan: are you blessed with a surface grinder or have you lapped or sanded those for that finish?
                      Most of the nice finish came from a 4" facemill. Then I touched them up quickly with a unified wheel on a bench grinder to smooth all the edges/faces Those things are amazing for making things look smooth and uniform. They are a bit pricey, but a real time saver on cosmetic parts.
                      Last edited by Dan Dubeau; 04-27-2018, 07:00 PM.

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                      • Just put the kids to bed, and went out to give them all a shot. Pleasantly surprised actually. As expected these chinese ccmt inserts are garbage. Wasn't expecting a lot there, and you could tell just by looking at them. But the CCGT inserts (the ground finish positive rake) inserts work very well on this small lathe (myford super 7). Took some cuts in a chunk of O1, and 6061, then bored a hole in the O1 with the smallest 7mm bar with a CCGT insert. Had the bar hanging out about 1" and it didn't "sing" at all. lots of deflection, and spring passes needed, but it actually cuts really nice. What a bonus. The bigger bars work as expected. I don't think even with good inserts the CCMT will work that great on this lathe, too much tool pressure, not enough HP and rigidity, but I'll try some out. I'm pretty happy with the cheap CCGT though. I'll order some more now so I have some for next fall....

                        Had a go at parting off with the 2mm insert and all worked well until I got down to about 1/4" dia. When I bought the part off tool, and the other turning tool I bought 16mm shanks, with the plan of being able to dial in bottom so it would sit flat on the top of the compound (0.625" from lathe centerline, measured with height gauge), and provide extra rigidity. The "turning tool" (I can never remember the proper sclrqrstuv nomenclature for the holders) is perfect, but the parting tool is still a bit high. Not so bad on the larger diam but doesn't work so good as it gets near the middle of the bar. Other than that, they both work great. I'll measure how much needs to come off and mill it off the bottom of the holders.

                        I did make another dovetail holder for a 16mm shank and should I get another insert tool (maybe a threading tool) all I've got to do is drill some clearance holes for an m6 screw at 0.75" spacing (yes I mixed " and mm....call it 19mm +/-0.05). I was initially going to weld those 16mm shanks tools in there, but came up with the cap screw idea at the line of scrimmage. Glad I went that route, and not really worried about the loss of rigidity by not welding. Anyway, here's some action shots. Don't mind the mess on the lathe. It will get cleaned someday.... I hardly ever use it anyway, just for the odd thing I need at home. First reason is I can use the hardinge hlvh, Microwielly engine lathe, or Nakamura CNC lathe at work for most of whatever I'm turning. My Little Myford falls WAY down the list of lathes I'd rather be using. Second reason is kinda tied to the first reason in that all the lathes at work are fully tooled up ready to go. My selection of tooling and holders etc at home are/were pretty lacking, so fiddling around with stuff at home just wasn't my idea of a good time when I could just do it at work when I got a chance. Third reason is I really hate the backwards handwheels on the Myford lol.......

                        About 0.03" DOC in 01

                        Boring with the 7mm bar. Lots of fine shavings.

                        Parting with 2mm insert

                        Siting flat on compound. Depth thumbscrew not really needed.....

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                        • About a 0.05" DOC in 6061 dry. Beautiful finish.


                          One thing I noticed when setting tool heights tonight that I missed previously is that there is a large chamfer on toolpost where the thumbscrews rest, and it's actually sitting on the chamfer instead of flat on the top. Not a huge deal if it's repeatable....but I'm still going to pull it apart, build it up with tig, and grind it back down flat again. I was originally going to make my own brass thumbscrews, and even made my own rope knurls, and form tool to do it, but found these cheap enough on amazon while looking for the setscrews that I lost interest in making them. I hate making hardware if I don't have to....

                          Next major project for this is an er32 collet chuck. I've had it drawn up, the collets, and nut sitting there for a couple years too lol. We should all compare our unfinished projects list..........
                          Last edited by Dan Dubeau; 04-27-2018, 09:05 PM.

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                          • Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                            And, here's some more holders today....
                            Before blackening


                            Very nice! Cleaned up on a belt grinder?

                            Last time I made tool holders I had to do them one at a time in a milling attachment in the atlas. I can't wait for the chance to make a new batch now that I have the mill.
                            Andy

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                            • Originally posted by vpt View Post
                              Very nice! Cleaned up on a belt grinder?

                              Last time I made tool holders I had to do them one at a time in a milling attachment in the atlas. I can't wait for the chance to make a new batch now that I have the mill.
                              Thanks. Unitized (like scotch brite, but much harder) wheel in a 6" bench grinder. Work awesome for deburring, and blending, and don't hurt critical dimensions unless you really lean into it. No belt grinder yet. It's on my list though.... My hat's off to you for making them that way. It would have taken me 4 more years to finish them if I had to use the lathe and milling attachment lol.

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                              • Has anyone archived this thread with all the photos that now ca no longer be viewed?

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