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  • Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
    I have always done my drill bits by hand, but eyes getting older, glasses thicker, etc, I'm more than ready to admit that I could use an alternative. I can still manage the larger ones OK by hand. What's the smallest drill you've been able to do a job on that you were happy with?
    My dad did the same thing with the same drill sharpener for a while. I'm not a fan of the idea as there is some danger involved using the side of grinding wheel. The problem is that once the wheel gets glazed, it only burns the bits and removes the temper. No real way to dress it. I'd say if you're going to go that route, use it with a carbide grinder that you can single point dress. Or, buy a cheapo drill doctor or something for the little bits.
    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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    • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
      My dad did the same thing with the same drill sharpener for a while. I'm not a fan of the idea as there is some danger involved using the side of grinding wheel. The problem is that once the wheel gets glazed, it only burns the bits and removes the temper. No real way to dress it. I'd say if you're going to go that route, use it with a carbide grinder that you can single point dress. Or, buy a cheapo drill doctor or something for the little bits.
      There are nice little jigs for the small stuff. Magnification during the set up is OK.
      Lautard's device is a good example.

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      • Looks like something from the Spanish Inquisition (middle photo).

        Are the screw all set at different angles, to make different angled points?

        Cheers
        Roger

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        • Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
          Looks like something from the Spanish Inquisition (middle photo).

          Are the screw all set at different angles, to make different angled points?

          Cheers
          Roger
          I usually just spin it by hand. The idea being that I can touch one up quickly without taking my gloves and hood off.

          They’re all set at the same angle. I made one prior to this with different angles, but once I found what I like I figured this one will do 95% of what I need.


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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          • Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
            Looks like something from the Spanish Inquisition (middle photo).

            Are the screw all set at different angles, to make different angled points?

            Cheers
            Roger
            Those differences in angles that you see forces the tips to be ground on a different section of the wheel. Look where the tips land for the
            various entry points on the jig.
            Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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            • Made a little device to prevent the moving vise jaw from influencing the alignment of the part on the fixed jaw, and also for non-parallel material holding. The ball is nice because it has no X or Y influence, but a hard ball on its own will dent your part, so force spreaders are needed. In this case, two cups with magnets in them to hold the assembly together, and hold it on the vise hands-free which is very convenient.

              I got the real motivation to make after seeing the "quadrallel" product online but thought it could be easier to make if I used magnets instead of springs, and more useful in a smaller form.

              Shown clamping a homemade 5 degree angle block.







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              • I need one of those.
                12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                Index "Super 55" mill
                18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                24" State disc sander

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                • I like it, except for one thing - chip cleanup with those magnets. I might make one myself, but try using heavy grease to hold the parts together.

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                  • Originally posted by Yondering View Post
                    I like it, except for one thing - chip cleanup with those magnets. I might make one myself, but try using heavy grease to hold the parts together.
                    The magnets are recessed so hopefully it will be easy to pick the chips out. Might put it inside a rubber sleeve or something to keep chips from sticking to the ball.

                    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

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                    • Blowing it off with compressed air might be adequate too.

                      Regardless, it seems like a handy little widget; nice work.

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                      • Matt
                        Very nice, great idea and better than a ball with a flat on one side.
                        Thanks for sharing
                        Nelson

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                        • I'll have to look and see if I have a larger ball bearing, I'm sure magnet or not it would be a great tool to have.
                          _____________________________________________

                          I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                          Oregon Coast

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                          • Originally posted by lugnut View Post
                            I'll have to look and see if I have a larger ball bearing, I'm sure magnet or not it would be a great tool to have.
                            All else fails, you can buy bearing balls onAliexpress cheaply. I was looking the other cay for parts to make a wobble broach

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                            • Matt, are the plates countersunk enough that the ball bears on them and not the magnet? Jim

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                              • Pull gear via mr. Pete

                                I have a 1970's vintage Drill Press which had originally been fitted with a 12 speed vee belt drive. When I purchased it second hand the intermediate pulley assembly was missing so I converted the drive to a four speed poly vee belt drive with a three phase motor and a VFD for infinitely variable speed control. Unfortunately the VFD does not provide enough torque at the low end of speeds for large diameter drill bits and hole saws. I seriously wanted to return it to the original drive configuration but I knew from using these machines at work that the effort required to shift from low to high speed involved loosening both belts and most often, swapping the belts top to bottom or vice versa. Then - I watched a video by Mr. Pete, AKA Tubal Cain in which he showed a "Pull Gear" which was essentially a planetary gearbox which could be fitted to the motor spindle of a drill press/lathe/bandsaw and was capable of providing a roughly 4:1 reduction in RPM and corresponding increase in torque. The original pull gear is no longer in production but you can purchase used or new/old stock on some auction sites. I wanted to make one of my own so I reverse engineered the design based on the patent drawings provided by Mr. Pete and what do you know, it turned out to be successful. I have produced a series of YouTube videos documenting the build and I have put the design files on Dropbox for anyone who might want to build their own. The Dropbox link is here https://www.dropbox.com/preview/Publ...?role=personal
                                The files are all in Autodesk Inventor format but the working drawings are PDF.


                                Here is a picture of the completed Pull Gear in the direct drive (1:1) ratio. The toggle on top of the pulley is locked into the slot so that the internal spindle drives the lower portion of the pulley at the same speed as the motor.




                                Here is the Pull Gear in it's reduction speed mode. Now the upper portion of the pulley is locked by the pin with the red anodised handle and the internal planetary gears reduce the speed to the lower pulley assembly. It has a 22 tooth M1 sun gear and a 100 tooth ring gear which gives a ratio of 4.54:1
                                The drive is very powerful and I can now use drill bits up to 25mm diameter and really large hole saws in metal with no problem.


                                Here is a picture of the etched brass nameplate I put on the outside of the belt cover for the Drill Press. It's just my little inside joke. You know - Intel Inside; Pull Gear Inside!

                                Regards,
                                Preso

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