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  • Torx is superior.
    12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
    Index "Super 55" mill
    18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
    7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
    24" State disc sander

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    • My grandson Is an A&P mechanic in Wisconsin and they are having lots of headaches caused by Allen head screws in aluminum which most airplanes are built of. he stated even using best quality Allen sets it still happens because of the electrolisis SP?
      Last edited by im#2; 07-23-2019, 05:05 PM.

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      • on cars, torx is better. higher torque without stripping, unlike allen head.
        san jose, ca. usa

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        • lots of headaches caused by Allen head screws in aluminum which most airplanes are built of
          Exactly.
          My explanation is that good Allen head bolts are made of hard steel and they are then given a surface finish of some sort (black). The much softer aluminium can flow at the microscopic or atomic level, such that it locks into the surface finish of the bolts somehow. Then you have to break that weak weld over a huge surface area. This does not happen with steel because it does not flow in the same way.

          Cheers

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          • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
            I'm not sure I understand the hate? Other than needing the tool, torx is a wonderful fastener. Yes, all of us machinists love the fit of a quality allen in a quality socket-head cap screw. But on (human-power) bikes and stuff, they often have lower quality fasteners that get adjusted a lot, under high-tension, being adjusted with worn, low quality wrenches. They strip all the time. In these cases, torx is the superior fastener.
            Once the axle nut is loose the torque needed on the tensioner screw to pull the axle back is very light. And even if the axle nut is left a touch snug to avoid the axle falling back off the end of the tensioner screw the torque needed is still light. The term "tensioner" in this case is a bit of a misnomer since we never want the drive chain to actually be tight. So it is really a "slack adjustment" screw. It's just that it's radial overkill for a chain tensioning screw. And given the amount of dirt that flies around the back of a motorcycle wheel when touring around the pocket can easily get filled with mud and need cleaning out. For this reason I'd rather just have a common hex head. Or like some I've seen just a slot head screw.

            I do agree that Torx is a nice design. Of course Torx screws and tools are a lot more common today than they were back when I learned to poo-poo them when they first came out and the tools for them were not all that common.
            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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            • My vote is for proper tapered Robertson being superior to both hex and torx.
              But I am a canuck eh!?
              Cheers,
              Jon

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              • I'm OK with torx bolts. My one gripe with them came when replacing a wheel cylinder on my Chevy pickup. Lying on my back in dark and freezing cold December night, reaching around the backing plate, and the usual box wrench would not go on. Switched to metric, and no joy there either. Squirmed around for a better look and there it was, a torx head bolt. Not the kind with a socket that fit all my male torx tools , but a male head for which I did not posess a torx socket. Got on the horn to all the local auto supply places and not one sells torx sockets. Oreiley's, has them but only in sets. So off I go and pay more for the set than I did for the wheel cylinder, which btw did not come with new bolts to give me a clue. My ignorance?
                “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                Lewis Grizzard

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                • The wonderful thing about Torx heads and drivers is that there is no metric/imperial confusion. The Torx drivers have their own size series, and that is it. You don't need two sets. (The thread on the bolts is another matter.)

                  Cheers
                  Roger

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                  • Ack, ya just had to go giving them ideas didn't you Roger! You wait, they'll be imperial-sized Torx by the middle of next week!

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                    • I've just been driving some 5/16" X 4" structural wood screws that take a T30 driver, using the same cordless impact driver that I use for smaller screws with Philips, Robertson and hex heads. For this use the Torx is so much better and so trouble free that the others don't even compare.

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                      • The screws that are recommended for installing cement backer board have torx sockets in them, and the driver bit is included in the box. They worked great, even after I had to remove a few that had been filled with thinset.
                        “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                        Lewis Grizzard

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                        • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                          Ack, ya just had to go giving them ideas didn't you Roger! You wait, they'll be imperial-sized Torx by the middle of next week!
                          Torx are already imperial-sized. Just numbers, same as imperial machine screws, number drills, wire gauges, sheet gauges etc, etc, etc.

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                          • Originally posted by cameron View Post
                            Torx are already imperial-sized. Just numbers, same as imperial machine screws, number drills, wire gauges, sheet gauges etc, etc, etc.
                            Well, that's rubbish! Had assumed the numbers were at least a measurement of something - either metric or imperial. Arbitrary numbers are more annoying! ....but nothing that this nice cool beer in the sun can't overcome! ;-D

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                            • Originally posted by Dave C View Post
                              The screws that are recommended for installing cement backer board have torx sockets in them, and the driver bit is included in the box. They worked great, even after I had to remove a few that had been filled with thinset.
                              They work great for all woodscrews except maybe drywall.
                              All other phillips screws have been banned in my household.
                              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                              • Originally posted by cameron View Post
                                I've just been driving some 5/16" X 4" structural wood screws that take a T30 driver, using the same cordless impact driver that I use for smaller screws with Philips, Robertson and hex heads. For this use the Torx is so much better and so trouble free that the others don't even compare.
                                What I made my pallets with. I'm ready to never buy Philips head again.

                                Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

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