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  • Very nicely done, congrats.
    I have bookmarked this page for future reference.
    This tool has been on my to-do list for a long while....

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    • Been enjoying this post for quite a while, thought I'd add to it.

      Worlds most over engineered grinder stand:

      Like everyone else, space in shop is limited. So I came up with this stand, holds 3 grinders in the space of one. All grinders are powered up at all times, so allows quick access.

      First time trying to post video, so hope this works.

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      • Very cool!

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        • Not over engineered, merely a clever solution to the problem at hand!
          "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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          • Yes, I agree a good idea and great job too!

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            • Geez that's clever and well made!
              Super job.

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              • Spent a bit of time and very little money sawing, turning, milling, drilling and tapping an off-cut of 100mm diameter 1045 into a couple of 65mm square tool-posts for the lathe. One will fit on the compound, the other directly on the cross-slide.

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                • Rjazz, that's a fantastic stand. And a great solution to the issue.

                  I especially like your ability to angle the tool grinder to reach more of the wheel faces with more clearance.

                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • How did you get the bottom two grinders to slowly rise like that?

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                    • Originally posted by Baz View Post
                      How did you get the bottom two grinders to slowly rise like that?
                      You can see a gas spring in the back
                      Helder Ferreira
                      Setubal, Portugal

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                      • Original plan was to use a counterweight in the back. After getting it mocked up, turned out would have needed too much weight, so had to adjust on the fly. Went with 2 gas springs, and setup to travel over center, so when in down position, springs keep assembly tucked in under the base.

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                        • Originally posted by Mike Burch View Post
                          Spent a bit of time and very little money sawing, turning, milling, drilling and tapping an off-cut of 100mm diameter 1045 into a couple of 65mm square tool-posts for the lathe. One will fit on the compound, the other directly on the cross-slide.

                          Click image for larger version

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                          how long did it take you for the pair?

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                          • About three days, but working perhaps only a couple of hours a day, in deference to my aging back. As I am retired, time is not a consideration.

                            I was interested in the recent thread on work-hardening problems with 1045. I did not experience any such problems with this billet of it, and as I am not experienced with this alloy it did not occur to me to take any precautions against it, as I would have taken had it been stainless. Perhaps 1045 comes in different flavours?

                            I used the big tool-post for the first time today, parting off some aluminium. I had been bothered by problems with the parting-off tool holder, and discovered today that it was not properly square! Checking it with a square I discovered that the bottom of the supposedly square cross-section had a barely-noticeable ridge along one edge, which caused it to sit slightly canted in the tool-post. As the insert is very little wider than the bit of holder it sits on, the bottom of the latter was contacting the parent bit of material (i.e., the bit staying in the chuck) when the insert advanced more than about 5mm into the work. Milling the bottom of the holder flat and exactly square to the side with the insert has cured the problem.

                            Removing the compound and setting up the big new tool-post in its place on the cross-slide takes only a little longer than it used to take me to remove a holder from the original tool-post and install and line up the parting-off holder. The new tool-post is solid and more rigid than the combination of compound slide and small tool-post, so it's better suited to those operations which do not need the extra facilities a compound offers.

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                            • Just checking: it was the commercial tool holder (square bar holding inset) which had the ridge?
                              I hate it when I cannot rely on the tools themselves.

                              Cheers
                              Roger

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                              • My QCTP parting tool holder also has a slight angle at the bottom. It's there to help hold the tool inward against the vertical face. Since it's such a narrow ledge it's possible to have downward pressure from cutting force the blade to slide off.
                                .
                                "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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