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  • Bruno, your work on the Pillar Tool is very impressive, but I would like to see and know more about you ball turning tool. Did you make it? Would you care to share some information on it ?
    Thanks
    _____________________________________________

    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
    Oregon Coast

    Comment


    • Originally posted by lugnut View Post
      Bruno, your work on the Pillar Tool is very impressive, but I would like to see and know more about you ball turning tool. Did you make it? Would you care to share some information on it ?
      Thanks
      The ball turning device was published in the German magazine "Das Dampfmodell" in issue No.1/94 page 30-31.
      It is made of a holder which is clamped on the top slide of the lathe. Exactly in the middle of the lathe, there is a bearing hole in this holder for a rotary axis. I have inserted bronze bushes there. A movable slide is mounted on a rotary axis, which in turn holds a cutting tool holder.
      This can be seen on the drawing.
      The cutting tool is adjusted with the cross slide exactly to the center of rotation. With the movable slide, the diameter of the ball can be adjusted.
      By turning the axle the ball is manufactured.
      I built this device in 1992.

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      this is my device
      Last edited by Bruno Mueller; 09-26-2020, 10:30 AM.
      Many greetings from Germany
      Bruno
      http://www.mueller-bruno.de

      Comment


      • Thank you, Bruno, even though I can't read the German instructions, the drawings and your photo of yours are very plain. I think I will give it an attempt to build.
        Thanks agin
        Mel
        _____________________________________________

        I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
        Oregon Coast

        Comment


        • I have started a new project.
          It shall become a vice. I found it at Hemingway in England and used the favorable exchange rate.


          I ordered the material set and after a few days it was there.
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          The drawings are once again, as usual, given in inches.
          So everything converted and adjusted.


          When everything is ready, it should look like this.
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          Yesterday was the start. Part 1, I finished the base plate. The 360° graduation and the fitting of the pass strips are still missing, but they will be attached later.
          First the cast blank was clamped onto the large face plate chuck and the bottom side was turned flat.
          Then the center of the round casting shoulder was torn on the upper side. I did this with the centering angle. Again on the faceplate chuck this center was aligned and drilled, and the hole was turned out to 19.5mm and reamed with a 20mm reamer. The surface was turned so far that no casting skin was visible and the surface was smooth.
          Now the 20 degree bevel could be turned. The inner heel was turned to the required depth and diameter. The center was supported with the rolling center punch and the top of the clamping flange was turned.
          The groove for the clamping screws of the actual vice was cut to the required depth and width. For this purpose I ground a recessing steel from a broken off 6mm carbide cutter.
          Now the part was taken to the milling machine and the outer contours of the clamping flange were machined.
          Finally the mounting holes were torn and drilled. The positioning of the holes was based on the conditions of my milling machine table. My T-slots are 50mm apart.
          In order to clamp the vice on the lathe (I have a groove distance of 75mm there), this dimension was also taken into account.
          A 19mm hole to the groove was drilled from below.
          Now I could clamp the base plate with a 20mm clamping bolt on the rotary table. Through the 19mm counter bore I could insert a T-slot milling cutter with 6mm shank from below and clamp it in the collet chuck of the milling machine and finish milling the T-slot.

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          To be continued.
          Many greetings from Germany
          Bruno
          http://www.mueller-bruno.de

          Comment


          • I have already pre-milled the actual vice. The dovetail for the movable jaw was already finished. I also milled the seat for the actual vice jaw.

            The milling of the clamping plate and the outer contours is still missing.

            The hole for the clamping nut will be machined later.
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            Many greetings from Germany
            Bruno
            http://www.mueller-bruno.de

            Comment


            • With the vice I have come further. The lower part of the vice is almost finished. The drillings for the spindle nut and the attachment of the top jaws are still missing.
              I had to mill the dovetail again, the selfmade cutter had not shaped the corner properly. The corner radius of the insert was too large.

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              The corner is beautifully shaped with a groove.
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              The next step is the moving jaw.
              Last edited by Bruno Mueller; 10-12-2020, 04:11 AM.
              Many greetings from Germany
              Bruno
              http://www.mueller-bruno.de

              Comment


              • And on it goes with the vice.
                Today I have almost finished milling the movable jaw.
                Dovetail is finished and fits.
                Inner cutout for the spindle nut is fitting.
                Outside contours, up to the final height and the jaw support is also made.

                First I clamped the blank with the upper side (which was relatively straight and did not wobble) on the milling table.
                As a stop I put a 12mm fitting strip into the rear guide groove of the milling table and clamped the blank with claws.
                Now the underside of the vice was milled slightly and in the same clamping the sides were milled to a right angle up to 0.5 mm.
                Now I could place the jaw on the underside and machine the upper side. Here I left about 1mm to the final dimension.
                The jaw could now be clamped in the vice, which I had previously aligned exactly with the fine tracer.
                The dovetail was next.
                First only pre-milled and at the end the dovetail was milled with the HSS milling cutter. First of all only the side that does not get a positioning strip. This was tried again and again to see if it would fit on the vice.
                After that the other side was on. Here also again and again try if the adjusting bar fits. A tenth of air does not matter. It is compensated with the adjusting bar.
                Now the movable jaw was placed on its lower part and the sides were milled flush with the fixed jaw.
                Then the cut-out for the spindle nut was made.
                Still to be done, - the cutout for inserting the spindle nut.
                - the hole for the spindle, as well as the holes for the set screws and the top .


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                Milling the underside of the moving jaw.

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                Adjusting the vice with the fine feeler.


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                Milling the underside of the moving jaw.


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                The dovetail is milled ready.

                Attached Files
                Many greetings from Germany
                Bruno
                http://www.mueller-bruno.de

                Comment


                • Click image for larger version

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                  All elements put together.
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                  Underside of the movable jaw.

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                  Many greetings from Germany
                  Bruno
                  http://www.mueller-bruno.de

                  Comment


                  • A few drillings further it looks like this.
                    But still not finished.

                    The jaw is running like a leak.
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                    This morning I still had two hours time, so I worked a bit more.
                    At the bottom of the vice I drilled the hole for the spindle nut. Instead of 1/2" it was 12mm.
                    The counter bore was done with a countersink.
                    I drilled the hole for the spindle in the movable jaw. I drilled 13mm instead of the 3/8". There is a bronze bush for the spindle bearing. The mounting holes for the slide bolt were also drilled on this occasion.
                    The complete vice was then milled over again at the top and brought to the same height as the fixed jaw.
                    Finally, the seat of the interchangeable jaws was milled and milled again on the fixed jaw. This ensures the parallelism of the jaws.

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                    I will leave the interchangeable jaws about 2mm above the top of the vice, just like the sliding plate of the spindle.
                    This way, after removing the interchangeable jaws on the top of the vice, I can clamp flat and larger workpieces on the vice, resting on top.

                    Many greetings from Germany
                    Bruno
                    http://www.mueller-bruno.de

                    Comment


                    • Bruno
                      Your logo looks too neat to be punched (I think). How do you engrave it? CNC?

                      Cheers
                      Roger

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
                        Bruno
                        Your logo looks too neat to be punched (I think). How do you engrave it? CNC?

                        Cheers
                        Roger


                        The logo has been engraved on a conventional engraving machine Analog, for this purpose I first made a pattern in Linoleum cut. From this pattern a stencil was then milled in brass. This template is used as an engraving template.


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                        This is the logo in linoleum cut.


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                        This is the brass pattern.


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                        This is the analog engraving machine.
                        Last edited by Bruno Mueller; 10-16-2020, 11:44 AM.
                        Many greetings from Germany
                        Bruno
                        http://www.mueller-bruno.de

                        Comment


                        • Analog???
                          A pantograph engraving machine? How terribly 1920s! 🤣

                          Forgive me: if it works well, it is not a dumb idea. Just me being a bit biased in my technology. A friend of mine had a good one years ago.

                          Cheers
                          Roger

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
                            Analog???
                            A pantograph engraving machine? How terribly 1920s! 🤣

                            Forgive me: if it works well, it is not a dumb idea. Just me being a bit biased in my technology. A friend of mine had a good one years ago.

                            Cheers
                            Roger
                            Digital and CNC is not my world. During my apprenticeship I only got to know the analog machines. Shortly after that I used the first NC machines, which were still controlled by punch cards.
                            I cannot do anything with the computer technology of today. I prefer to go to the workshop and turn and mill in a very conventional way, without a PC.
                            Exactly the same applies to my drawings. These are made with pencil and a drawing board. I have a drawing program on my PC, but I do not use it, because it is too complicated for me
                            I'm old school.🤗
                            Many greetings from Germany
                            Bruno
                            http://www.mueller-bruno.de

                            Comment


                            • The machine is not even 100 years old, it was manufactured in the 1980s.
                              So about 40 years.
                              How many hobbyists still work with Southbend machines from the 1950s in their workshops today?
                              You don't necessarily need a CNC machine to make good work pieces.

                              I have occasionally helped a tool dealer with sales. At that time the beginnings of CnC machines were in the hobby area. There were customers who threw themselves at these machines. However, they had never owned a lathe before and had never worked on it. I tried to make it clear to these people that someone who cannot turn conventionally would not be able to do so with CNC machines.
                              These customers were of the opinion - I buy an automatic machine - I clamp some material and at the end a suitable workpiece comes out.
                              Wrong thought.😉😉
                              Many greetings from Germany
                              Bruno
                              http://www.mueller-bruno.de

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
                                Analog???
                                A pantograph engraving machine? How terribly 1920s! 🤣

                                Forgive me: if it works well, it is not a dumb idea. Just me being a bit biased in my technology. A friend of mine had a good one years ago.

                                Cheers
                                Roger
                                And Tracers. Lathe Tracers. I have seen the big hyraulic units, one specifically for my lathe.

                                Seems like too much effort. Years ago I saw a lathe tracer but smaller and fully hands on and a simple tacer.

                                think that thing on the back of my lathe. Put one up front to ride a pattern.

                                I could not afford it, bout $150. Never saw another one again. JR
                                My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                                https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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