Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shop Made Tools

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I don't think I've posted this here. Modified an ancient Kennedy rollaway cabinet to make a cart for my JDSquare Model 32 bender, which rotates on the vertical column, which mounts to a heavy duty welded base on wheels and casters. The electro/hydraulic power pack mounts in the bottom of the cabinet, which has a cutout for motor cooling. A power cord is mounted with a power on/off switch. Also the pushbutton switch for controlling the hydraulic cylinder in/out. Dies are stored in a built-in rack in the bottom of the cabinet, to keep the CG low. Smaller accessories and related tools are stored in drawers. Hydraulic reservoir is easily accessible for service.

    I have bent up to 1.5" (1.9" OD) 316 stainless schedule 40 pipe with it. Great machine.





    12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
    Index "Super 55" mill
    18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
    7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
    24" State disc sander

    Comment


    • ezduzit, that's ingenious! 👍
      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

      Comment


      • Originally posted by ezduzit;n1907896
        [url=https://postimg.cc/VS68ZngB
        [/url]
        Very nice. All it's missing is a wood table top
        Helder Ferreira
        Setubal, Portugal

        Comment


        • Thanks fellas. The top will be covered with a fitted rubber pad. Here are a couple projects I built on it that have proven its design approach. Have to say I really wouldn't change anything, though I will be adding more dies as I go. Because of the rotating feature, it stores in a very small footprint.



          12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
          Index "Super 55" mill
          18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
          7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
          24" State disc sander

          Comment


          • Today I finished with the rotating vice.
            A zero level plate was made and adjusted. The degrees were attached.
            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN2582.JPG
Views:	982
Size:	784.3 KB
ID:	1908334
            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN2584.JPG
Views:	961
Size:	872.8 KB
ID:	1908335
            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN2586.JPG
Views:	958
Size:	886.9 KB
ID:	1908336
            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN2585.JPG
Views:	960
Size:	936.7 KB
ID:	1908337
            Many greetings from the southwest of Germany.
            Bruno
            http://www.mueller-bruno.de

            Comment


            • BM--nice job on the vise.
              12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
              Index "Super 55" mill
              18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
              7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
              24" State disc sander

              Comment


              • Thank you!
                The production of the ring groove gave me some headaches.
                A small note on the production of the T-slot.
                Surely you can work it out with a hook chisel. I went a different way. I first cut the groove on the lathe from the top side. Then I drilled a 19mm clearance hole from the bottom side to the groove.
                Now I was able to mill the groove with a Woodruff milling cutter that had approximately the same dimensions as the later groove.
                I clamped the cutter with its 6mm shank from below through the 19mm clearance hole and the groove into a collet chuck.
                With moderate speed and a lot of air cooling I could make the groove. But it did not fit in its height. The milling cutter only made a slot of 2,5mm and the width is not adjustable.
                From China I ordered carbide T-slot cutters with the corresponding dimensions 1/2" x 1/4" x 5mm ; 6mm shank. When these were delivered, I re-milled the slot in the same way and brought it to a height of 5.5mm. The clamping bolts later have a height of 5mm and fit perfectly. These carbide cutters are actually intended for woodworking, but they also work in grey cast iron, but the speed and feed rate has to be adjusted.

                The link shows these cutters.
                https://www.ebay.de/itm/1-4-Schaft-6...oAAOSwcFhfYYXH
                Many greetings from the southwest of Germany.
                Bruno
                http://www.mueller-bruno.de

                Comment


                • Great job by Bruno!
                  Thank you for your report.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
                    Funny thing is that some of my CNC lathe programs are a bit like tracers, just 'different'.

                    Given a finished profile expressed mathematically (that is essential), I can program a tool bit to follow that shape. Then I set up a repeat loop which starts out far enough that the tool barely kisses the blank, then in successive passes I inch the whole profile inwards. (I should add that I do not use CAM; I write my programs by hand.)

                    Cheers
                    Roger
                    Do you use the G 71 roughing cycle?
                    Or G 41-42 radius compensation.

                    Comment


                    • I use Mach3, which follows the definitions set by the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) for g-code.
                      The NIST definitions include
                      G71: use inch format (rather than metric)
                      G41/2/3/4: path compensation methods

                      I believe it is Fanuc who use a different (non-NIST) definition for G71. A pity.
                      I don't use path compensation as it is rather complex to set up and get right. I prefer simple (and very sharp tips). I also shape some tools myself with a T&CG.

                      Cheers
                      Roger

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
                        I use Mach3, which follows the definitions set by the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) for g-code.

                        Nice name drop.

                        NIST is a non regulatory division of a US Government agency, they have no teeth so cannot force a company to operate under their standards, they can however stop a company from using their logo in advertising

                        There are other well respected groups that publish "standards" , all that they can legally do is stop companies from using their name in marketing if they do not comply.

                        SAE
                        ASTM
                        ABEC

                        Come to mind.
                        Last edited by Bented; 11-05-2020, 07:17 PM.

                        Comment


                        • I guess NIST have to rely on their displayed quality. They seem to manage.

                          Do any of the other Standards groups cover CNC machining?

                          Cheers
                          Roger

                          Comment


                          • The vice is now in place. Adjusted and ready for use.
                            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN2601.JPG
Views:	793
Size:	824.6 KB
ID:	1908899
                            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN2604.JPG
Views:	786
Size:	857.4 KB
ID:	1908900
                            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN2605.JPG
Views:	800
Size:	833.7 KB
ID:	1908901
                            Many greetings from the southwest of Germany.
                            Bruno
                            http://www.mueller-bruno.de

                            Comment


                            • [QUOTE=Bruno Mueller;n1908898]The vice is now in place. Adjusted and ready for use.

                              Yay!!! Good job, should be very handy.
                              “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                              Lewis Grizzard

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
                                i guess nist have to rely on their displayed quality. They seem to manage.

                                Do any of the other standards groups cover cnc machining?

                                Cheers
                                roger
                                Iso
                                Din

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X