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  • Originally posted by TGTool View Post

    Maxwell's demon out in the shop maybe if you trust him not to pinch the silver.

    .......
    And not to bop you on the head.......😉
    2730

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Everything not impossible is compulsory

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    • OK,
      I haven't posted in a LOOOOONNNG time. Just kinda got busy and I have purposely pulled back from social media of most types. There's just not much upside to interacting with strangers online in most cases. This place being the exception. This place and places like them, where people have a shared interest, as opposed to a binary hate, are much more my speed. I never post much before when I was here and probably won't post much now but, for now at least, hi, again.

      I know this is thread about Home Shop Made Tools. I don't have a home machine shop. I do various woodworking things at home instead. I do this as a professional Tool Maker and I don't need another job at home. I'll post a few things that are personal tooling related and, if people are interested, I'll post more tooling pictures of things that are work related but cool nonetheless.

      This is a depth indicator that unlike many of it's type can measure height also. With extensions it can measure a wide range.


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      • A V-Block that allows you to flip to all 4 sides. Other designs, at best, allow you to only use 3.
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        • Blocks that act as mini V-blocks to grind multiple parts at a time. I use them mostly for grinding Die-buttons but can be used for anything that fits their capacity.
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          • Originally posted by MaxxLagg View Post
            Blocks that act as mini V-blocks to grind multiple parts at a time. I use them mostly for grinding Die-buttons but can be used for anything that fits their capacity.
            I used to grind a fair amount of punches and used V-Blocks with multiple V's but the ones that I used had the V's inline so you could grind all the punches at the same time.
            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

            THINK HARDER

            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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            • All of these are new to me, keep 'em coming, and thanks!
              I cut it off twice; it's still too short
              Oregon, USA

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              • Some chutes that mount on top of a die where the parts are blown off. These deflect the parts through an opening into a hopper. The main body of the chute is machined out of piece of NAK55.
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                • Maxx, welcome back and thank you for posting.
                  Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                  • Parts for a packing machine. The original manufacture version is just a weldment that is prone to breakage at the welds. I redesigned them to avoid that problem.
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                    • Lovely work Maxx. Your packing machine parts, is that Iglidur or similar material on the horizontal element?
                      West Sussex UK

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                      • Nice work. I like that Vee block. I used to do a fair bit of pin grinding work and that would have been pretty handy a time or two. Same with the multi vee block. Really wish I had a WEDM to make tooling like that

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                        • Looks real nice.
                          Beaver County Alberta Canada

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                          • Originally posted by Alan Smith View Post
                            Lovely work Maxx. Your packing machine parts, is that Iglidur or similar material on the horizontal element?
                            This material is called Nyltron GS. Not sure how it compares to Iglidur. I'm not familiar with that material other than what I just looked up on Google. It's just basically a high wear resistance nylon. There really isn't any lubricity component.
                            Last edited by MaxxLagg; 12-02-2020, 06:30 AM.

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                            • Weld testing fixture that I designed and made. There is a rotary cylinder inside the mechanism that can rotate through a 90 or 180 degree (depending on which of the two parts they're testing) that tests the weld strength. It is operated by a totally pneumatic circuit that is anti-tiedown and is actuated by the two palm switches. The pneumatics makes it totally portable, and required no electricity or control logic other than what the pneumatic circuit provides.
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                              • This is an interesting one (at least to me). We have this process that uses 2 presses. One is a standard punch press, the other is a cam actuated (think VertiSlide type of machine for some of the old-timers that know of such things). In the standard punch press there is a die that makes a part. This part is not singulated but is left in strip form. It travels to the other machine where a screw is inserted and another component is resistance welded on. Since these are two separate machines, the distance (progression) between one process (The die) and the other two processes is critical. There are something like 150-200 progressions, don't remember how many, between operations. Lots of things affect this progression; temperature, sharpness of the die, stock hardness, and most importantly, distance. This distance was the most critical factor and the one that was easiest to mess up and the most difficult to adjust. Because of the second two operations, if this progress was off then it was impossible to insert the screw because the progression would be off enough to miss the hole. This solution for years was to move the die fore or aft relative to the 2nd operation a little bit to get the progression back in. A tedious and mistake prone endeavor.

                                My solution was to design and make this device. It basically makes the path between the two processes a variable distance. The radius portion of the track is moveable, to a larger or smaller radius, via segments. Need more or less distance? Just dial it in. As the strip of parts travel along the chord segment of the radius, making the radius larger or smaller makes the arc length the strip travels longer or shorter. It has a total of .100 +/- overall progression adjustment. We are able to adjust the progression on the fly now.
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