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  • #31
    I think he's saying it doesn't look like you have enough clearance to get the tool out even once released.

    I assumed that you were doing what I often do and just slide the tailstock clear and use the saddle as a stop.
    Paul Compton
    www.morini-mania.co.uk
    http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

    Comment


    • #32
      If the barrel travel between the drill first touching the work and the taper being ejected is only 1", then you indeed only need to wind the barrel back 1" to unseat the taper.

      Snag that I then find is, you try to take the arbour out of the socket in the barrel. It's loose, it can be moved forwards 1", at which point it hits the work or the chuck. Morse tapers are so shallow that you need to pull the arbour a long way out to get the tip of the drill far enough off centre to miss the work.

      You then end up dragging the tailstock back along the bed (as you've just run out of barrel travel - it's fully retracted).

      Don't you have this problem?
      All of the gear, no idea...

      Comment


      • #33
        Paul,

        I used to pull the tailstock back to change drills etc when I was using my Myford ML10 - no problems, the tailstock weighed almost nothing.

        But with one of these:

        http://www.lathes.co.uk/harrison%2Dm/page5.html

        it's not quite so easy!

        Ian
        All of the gear, no idea...

        Comment


        • #34
          With as much grief as John S got for his drill extensions this should really stir the pot

          A knurler for the drill press with a work piece to prove it works


          And in action


          And a bonus pic of some cutting tools made from drill rod


          One isn't a cutting tool... OOPs
          Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

          Comment


          • #35
            How 'bout these?
            Steady rest for a Taig lathe


            Slitting saw arbor


            90 degree flycutter for the hand ground bit for cutting gears


            Rats, can't find a picture of the lashup I used as an indexer. Basically a shaft held in clamping saddles, the whole thing welded up out of HRS. Gear blank on one end, master gear and spring loaded detent lever on the other. All bolted down on the Chicom milldrill. Woulda been enough to give the purists around apoplexy.
            Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by camdigger
              With as much grief as John S got for his drill extensions this should really stir the pot
              Water off a ducks back they work for me, may not work for others but you take the best of the best and adapt.

              .
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



              Comment


              • #37
                On those drill extensions JohnS showed isnt that what those Herbert quick change chucks could be used for a lot quicker than electing morse tapers
                Just a thought!
                Peter
                I have tools I don't know how to use!!

                Comment


                • #38
                  Camdigger,

                  I'm kind of curious about the drill press knurling tool but the picture is too small for me to see how it works.

                  Thought it was a clickable thumbnail but it is'nt.

                  What are the cutting tools with the square on the end used for?

                  Brian
                  OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                  THINK HARDER

                  BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                  MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Sir John,

                    Thanks for your posts.

                    I like the air tapper. Looks like it would save a lot of stress on the wrists if you have a lot of holes to tap.

                    Below is a pic of a countersink extension that is similar to the ones you made for your lathe.

                    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                    THINK HARDER

                    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by bborr01
                      Camdigger,

                      I'm kind of curious about the drill press knurling tool but the picture is too small for me to see how it works.

                      Thought it was a clickable thumbnail but it is'nt.

                      What are the cutting tools with the square on the end used for?

                      Brian
                      The Knurler works like a 3 wheel tubing cutter with knurls substituted for the pressure and cutting wheels. 2 are commercial replacement knurl wheels, the third is a piece of drill rod. I'll dig around for a picture that hasn't been compressed.

                      Better?





                      The square ended cutting tools are D bit reamers. 2 are from drill rod, the smallest is a 1/4" prehard drill blank.
                      Last edited by camdigger; 01-21-2010, 03:44 PM.
                      Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Engineering tools turned hillbilly wind chimes

                        Below is a pic of something my 10 year old nephew made for me.

                        They started out as what I refer to as engineering tools and morphed into hillbilly wind chimes.

                        The nephew seems to exhibit some artistic tendencies.

                        Brian

                        OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                        THINK HARDER

                        BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                        MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Simple Vise Stop

                          I recall from a previous thread the question was asked about drilling holes in a mill vise.

                          All of our mills, dozens of them , had a 1/4-20 hole drilled in the fixed jaw on the left side of the vise. Well, not actually on the hardened jaw but right behind it. All Kurt vises. None better as far as I know.

                          Most of the toolmakers had one of these or something similar in their toolbox.

                          The lockwashers served as a shim to space the stop out beyond the hardened jaw. Also the extra cap screw is just screwed in for storage when not in use. Different length screws for positioning things in different places in the vise.

                          My next post is a stop that I made that I like much better though.

                          Brian

                          OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                          THINK HARDER

                          BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                          MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            My Favorite Vise Stop

                            Below is my favorite vise stop.

                            Very versatile. I use it with my mill vise with or without the swivel on the vise.

                            It clamps down with a 1/2 inch bolt and the threaded rod is also 1/2 inch.

                            It makes it handy to be able to use the same size wrench as the drawbar uses, a 3/4 inch wrench.

                            Also note that the nut on the backside of the stop sits in a slot to keep it from turning, therefore requiring only one wrench to adjust it.

                            I find that I get enough tools on the mill table without having to have an extra wrench there too.

                            One more modification that I plan is to chuck the threaded rod up in the lathe and put a point on it.

                            Brian

                            [/IMG]
                            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                            THINK HARDER

                            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Take a 30 dollar drill press and void the warranty and you get this:

                              Just think about the uses for drilling holes if you index the spindle.



                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                I do a lot of collet work, and I've occasionally found that certain long, thin pieces, especially if the stock is undersize from the norm, could tilt in the jaws and spin eccentric.

                                To fix this, I made this special 5C collet stop:



                                The pointed end is for small tubing or pieces that are centerdrilled. The concave end is basically a circular V-block, and will center an undrilled piece. The "nut" is even counterbored to the point the big end can almost go flush with the threads, to give me the max working range for a stop.

                                Next, the tool that gave Frank the idea for his air grinder.

                                I made this mount to hold a cheap air die-grinder on my QC toolpost, though rather than grinding, I'd originally intended mine for thread milling.



                                I had some work that needed a short, coarse thread to a shoulder, and cutting conventional internal threads... well, I was scrapping more than I was producing. Milling the thread made it easier and faster, and in aluminum I could cut the threads full depth in one pass.

                                However, the airmotor was far too fast for any other application (and the bearings really not all that great for any kind of precision grinding) and slowing it down (hence the brass flow control valve) would lose what little torque it had.

                                So I built this electric workhead:



                                It's just an old DC treadmill motor on a cobbled steel frame, and a modified prefab "buffer" arbor- the kind where you bolt it to the table, hook up an old washing machine motor or whatever, and have a buffing wheel.

                                This one's considerably slower (about 2500 rpm or so) and variable down to probably 500 or so before it loses too much HP, nicely rigid, and has enough torque I can mill semi-coarse threads in 303 stainless in one pass.

                                It also works very well as a toolpost grinder, though is probably a little slow for the small stones.

                                My shop is chock full of stuff like that. None of 'em are particularly fancy, they were built to do the job and not much more.

                                Doc.
                                Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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