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  • 1-800miner
    replied
    The penny! you didn't lose it, did you?

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  • lugnut
    replied
    Max, that looks great and very useful. Now I have another tool to make, hope you don't mind me copying it.

    Leave a comment:


  • jphonger
    replied
    Another beauty, Max!

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  • mars-red
    replied
    I made another specialized watchmaking tool recently, this one is a movement holder for securing watch movements during disassembly, reassembly, oiling, and adjusting. There are a couple different basic designs I've seen, and I prefer this type for its versatility due to interchangeable jaws. The holder I had been using is an inexpensive one of mediocre quality that works but I really wanted something with much larger capacity (most of the watch work I do is on larger pocket watch movements and I have some car clock and travel/desk clock movements that are even larger, that I'd like to have a holder to fit). My current holder also has only one set of jaws that are plastic (which is great) that don't have a very convenient profile for most movements. I could have made jaws for my existing holder but it still would have been smaller than I want.

    I had the design for this kicking around for a while, it's one I did to get some practice with Fusion 360. Recently I was visiting my family down South and decided this would be a great project to work on, for some quality time in my Dad's shop with him and my brother. All the parts for this (except the one spring it uses) were made on my Dad's South Bend Heavy 10 lathe and Rockwell mill. All components made from nothing but the finest scrapbinium.

    The side plates (body?) and the set of jaws shown here are made from aluminum. The guide pins (dowels) are O1 drill rod (not heat treated at all, just used because of the good ground finish and consistent diameter), and the screw is a single piece made from 416 stainless steel (single pointed 1/4"-28).

    This set of jaws should be fine for most everything but I foresee making a plastic set for some of the much older movements that have delicate gilt finishes, and the next very small wristwatch movement I have to work on will probably warrant a set of larger diameter jaws to save having to close up the holder as far. I haven't used it for real yet, but so far it is at least very pleasing to fiddle with, the operation is pleasantly smooth and free of slop, and it has some nice heft to it. I will post a follow-up pic when I've had a chance to try it with a watch movement. If it works as well as I think it will then I may tweak a couple of things and then make a few more of them using materials specifically chosen rather than whatever happened to be on hand.





    Last edited by mars-red; 06-26-2018, 09:40 AM.

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  • mattthegamer463
    replied
    Whipped up a little vise stop out of some scrap unknown alloy steel. Has relief cuts so you can still mill past the edge of a short part, although not by much.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

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  • bborr01
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
    Yup. But I haven't tried to turn 1mm OD 0.5mm id washers!
    I haven't either but I have turned stacks of very thin shims that were larger OD and it worked good once they were all the same diameter. Until then they had a habit of just folding over.

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
    I have turned thin shims on a mandrel on a lathe. Almost no burr if you do it right.

    Brian
    Yup. But I haven't tried to turn 1mm OD 0.5mm id washers!

    Leave a comment:


  • bborr01
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
    And I was going to suggest turning the washers in lathe between support "dowels".. works fine with little bit bigger sizes.
    I have turned thin shims on a mandrel on a lathe. Almost no burr if you do it right.

    Brian

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    Where did you buy those huge M&M's? I can't find them anywhere
    And I was going to suggest turning the washers in lathe between support "dowels".. works fine with little bit bigger sizes.

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  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthegamer463 View Post
    The measured that the regulator is consuming 250mA at 12V. About 3 watts total. I haven't counted the number of diodes or speculated on the arrangement.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
    Thanks. I'm gonna' try putting some more power into mine see what happens.
    Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 06-05-2018, 07:49 AM.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by 90LX_Notch View Post
    This is a little die that a made to make a .047od x .020id x .003 thick washer that I used as a shim on a micro wobbler steam engine that I built.





    -Bob
    Where did you buy those huge M&M's? I can't find them anywhere

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  • mattthegamer463
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
    Did you happen to measure the voltage & current out of the regulator? Mine is 8v & 125ma = 1w. There's 72 diodes, likely 2 serial sets of 36 in parallel. 125ma through 36 in parallel is only 3-1/2ma per. 14mw per. That's not very much.
    The measured that the regulator is consuming 250mA at 12V. About 3 watts total. I haven't counted the number of diodes or speculated on the arrangement.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

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  • wombat2go
    replied
    Originally posted by Noitoen View Post
    That little metal indexer in front should help when you turn the drill around.
    I have a similar device to the one in Matt's photo.
    I found that the little black pointer was a reason for inaccuracy because it bears on the angled web under the cutting edge.
    I now align the cutting edges before each clamping by eyeball down the cutting edge to the nose of the casting. Not perfect nor perfectly consistent , but I usually get good enough drills.
    (Photo posted before I think)
    https://app.box.com/s/qi7pa57yqtubniwfwlxjrpgr6frlakc0

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  • mattthegamer463
    replied
    Originally posted by Noitoen View Post
    That little metal indexer in front should help when you turn the drill around.
    It does but the slots it slides in are a very loose fit so it doesnt work repeatably. The distance you stick it into the drill flute has a large impact on the position and with small drills it only gets trickier. It takes some practice, and I definitely need more.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

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  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthegamer463 View Post
    Its a 100mm white LED ring light used for aftermarket daytime running lights on cars. It comes with its own voltage and current regulator so it runs easily off just a wall adapter. ...
    Did you happen to measure the voltage & current out of the regulator? Mine is 8v & 125ma = 1w. There's 72 diodes, likely 2 serial sets of 36 in parallel. 125ma through 36 in parallel is only 3-1/2ma per. 14mw per. That's not very much.

    Leave a comment:

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