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  • Noitoen
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthegamer463 View Post
    I've only done a couple drills so far, a 1/4" being the smallest. Even at that size getting the drill re-indexed when rotating it to do the other edge was difficult, but it did produce a very nice drill in the end. I'm not in love with the sharpener and I'm working on a design for one that uses an ER32 collet block.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
    That little metal indexer in front should help when you turn the drill around.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthegamer463
    replied
    Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
    I have always done my drill bits by hand, but eyes getting older, glasses thicker, etc, I'm more than ready to admit that I could use an alternative. I can still manage the larger ones OK by hand. What's the smallest drill you've been able to do a job on that you were happy with?
    I've only done a couple drills so far, a 1/4" being the smallest. Even at that size getting the drill re-indexed when rotating it to do the other edge was difficult, but it did produce a very nice drill in the end. I'm not in love with the sharpener and I'm working on a design for one that uses an ER32 collet block.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • 90LX_Notch
    replied
    Dian-

    No. First the .020 diameter hole is punched: then that is set on the .020 pilot of the .047 punch. The .047 diameter is then punched producing the washer. This was a very simple die that was made in order to produce one usable washer/shim. If you look at the pictures you can make out the .020 punch. It is simply a piece of .020 music wire. The .047 punch was made from drill rod. The "dies" that the punches go through are simply holes drilled through the aluminum "die set".

    It is the type of thing that people would scoff at and state everything that is wrong with it, except it worked well. After I got the one required brass washer/shim I produced a bunch more to see if the aluminum would hold up. It did fine. I then proceeded to punch .0015 Precision Brand steel shim stock. Then I punched .002 steel feeler gauge stock. Only after punching the steel did a .0002 burr start to form. The first picture shows the .002 thick shim stock washers.

    -Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Originally posted by dian View Post
    so you punch the washer in one step?
    He'd need at least two strokes of the tool to get one finished washer.

    That is an example of a follow-on tool: each stroke pierces one hole (ID) and blanks a second (OD).

    The material must advance to a position that centers the pierced hole under the blanking punch. Upon the second stroke of the tool, the tit on the nose of the blanking punch enters the pierced hole, helping final alignment.

    Leave a comment:


  • mickeyf
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthegamer463 View Post
    I decided I should get into a drill sharpenjng jig to try to make drill bits that actually drill close to size, instead of the wonky results of my hand grinding. Particularly on smaller drills.

    I bought one of these common ones which I saw a lot of love and hate for online, but for $25 CAD I thought it was worth a try. It's not something I want to use 8 hours a day but it works and with some practice I was able to rehab one of my stub drills that I murdered.

    My welding table clamp system worked great to mount the sharpener next to my grinder.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
    I have always done my drill bits by hand, but eyes getting older, glasses thicker, etc, I'm more than ready to admit that I could use an alternative. I can still manage the larger ones OK by hand. What's the smallest drill you've been able to do a job on that you were happy with?

    Leave a comment:


  • dian
    replied
    Originally posted by 90LX_Notch View Post
    This is a little die that a made to make a .047od x .020id x .003 thick washer that I used as a shim on a micro wobbler steam engine that I built.





    -Bob
    so you punch the washer in one step?

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthegamer463
    replied
    I spotted from Little Machine Shop a MT2 tailstock accessory that could attach a 3" import lathe chuck to use as a live centre. I had the chuck, seemed silly to spend over $100 USD for the MT2 mount.

    I found a MT2 live centre at Princess Auto for $20, a key feature on it was the entire end rotated and not just the point. I cut off the point, made an adapter plate froman old scrap 6061 machine roller, and did a shrink fit on the head of the live centre.

    Works pretty good so far, should be nice for supporting items I don't want to centre drill or things like pipes without a bull nose centre.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthegamer463 View Post
    Its a 100mm white LED ring light used for aftermarket daytime running lights on cars. It comes with its own voltage and current regulator so it runs easily off just a wall adapter.

    https://www.ebay.ca/itm/12V-COB-LED-...qNJvFfwuHGIr5g

    ...
    I got one of those and I did not have the same experience. Mine is quite dim: at 6" distance, it's intensity is 730 lux. Compared to 1370 lux on my bench top from LED tubes 36" above. Running off a 12v battery. I'm tempted to diddle with it, but I doubt that it's worth my time.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    I have one of those and for me it works a treat. Took a bit of experimenting to find the right angle to hold the drill to get the relief angle I wanted (you change it by rotating the drill ever so slightly one way or another) but I've since sharpened over 100 drills with it. If that's the original wheel that came with your grinder you may want to look into replacement wheels. I bought a 100grit white Norton wheel for mine and it cuts very well but leaves a lovely finish.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthegamer463
    replied
    I decided I should get into a drill sharpenjng jig to try to make drill bits that actually drill close to size, instead of the wonky results of my hand grinding. Particularly on smaller drills.

    I bought one of these common ones which I saw a lot of love and hate for online, but for $25 CAD I thought it was worth a try. It's not something I want to use 8 hours a day but it works and with some practice I was able to rehab one of my stub drills that I murdered.

    My welding table clamp system worked great to mount the sharpener next to my grinder.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • dalee100
    replied
    Hi,

    Nice job on the threading tool. I've done a few oddballs like that over the years. Those little ones really are hard to make. And so easy to break when used. Guard it with your life!

    Leave a comment:


  • 90LX_Notch
    replied
    This is a small shop made internal threading tool that was used to cut a 10-32 LH thread.





    -Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • 90LX_Notch
    replied
    This is a little die that a made to make a .047od x .020id x .003 thick washer that I used as a shim on a micro wobbler steam engine that I built.





    -Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthegamer463
    replied
    Whipped up a mill stop from leftover rods and clamps from a cheap indicator arm. I stole the magnet for the flexible lamp I made so it was lying around, and I didn't have any way to repeat the placement of parts in the mill.

    Made a base out of aluminum scrap and used a 3/8" bolt with a piece of 3/8" square HRS welded on top as a lock. Just loosen and slide out of the T slot. A regular T nut from my lamp set is underneath. In place of the indicator holder is a 3/8" CRS rod with a rounded tip to go against the work. Can easily be adjusted just about any way to ensure clearance from the cutter.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthegamer463
    replied
    Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
    What happens when a chip gets hold of that light and pulls it into the quill or drill?

    Brian
    If the work will lead to chips that are that big, and you're not able to pause and break them off, and they're strong enough to knock the light, and the light is in a position where it can get hooked up on something instead of just rubbing, then you can always move it out of the way and shine it at the work from the side.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:

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