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  • milling table clamp/vice



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    • "Peened with a hammer whilst still hot lead to virtually no distortion"

      interesting, what exactly does it mean, how do you do it? being swiss, i dont understand "peening".

      Comment


      • Peening

        Originally posted by dian
        "Peened with a hammer whilst still hot lead to virtually no distortion"

        interesting, what exactly does it mean, how do you do it? being swiss, i dont understand "peening".
        Peening means to hammer all over, usualy this is done with the round side of a ball pein hammer. The "standard" anglo-saxon mechanics hammer is flat on one side of the head and rounded on the other. I don't know what your hammers are like, the French "Marteau Rivoir" are not as good for this. I know that German and Potugese are different. Peening creates small dimples and counteracts the contraction when cooling. I hammered the weld pretty hard with a 1Kg hammer. A weld of this size generates a lot of heat. I deliberately welded without stopping so that the piece heated up not only in the weld, but the parent metal as well.

        Regards, Matthew
        Last edited by mattinker; 05-02-2010, 03:34 AM.

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        • Matt What did you weld with a stick, mig or tig machine..Jack

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          • Here is an adapter for a drill to the knee crank on a Bridgeport. The material is 12L14, which is GREAT to machine BTW. The main body is 1.625" in diameter and 1.75" long, then there's the shank that fits in the drill chuck, which is .5" in diameter and 1" long with three flats .020" deep so it doesn't spin. The functional dimensions were just taken from the stock crank as far as depth and number of teeth (nine divisions makes the teeth, the cutter edge is set on the center line of the part), the diameter and depth of that counterbore (.950 diameter, .250" deep), and the size and depth of the hole (.625" diameter, 1.6" deep).



            This is going to be one of the intermediate level machining projects for my class next semester. It's a useful part that gives lathe and milling experience, including using the dividing head and the co-ax indicator. I'm going to make sure to change a few things though. If you look at the teeth, they're angled a bit on the inside ends because I used a 3/16" endmill. It doesn't seem to affect it, but that's not like the original, so I think an 1/8" endmill is in order. I'll also have them turn down the body to reduce the weight. This thing is heavy!!!

            Edit: I uploaded a video of it onto youtube

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwWA1JZoEgc
            Last edited by hornluv; 05-02-2010, 10:58 AM.
            Stuart de Haro

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            • Mig or Tig

              Originally posted by Plumber
              Matt What did you weld with a stick, mig or tig machine..Jack
              Jack,

              I mig welded it, i could have stick welded it, but it takes longer. With the MIG, you can go back so easily to build up where one needs metal no inclusion risk!

              Regards, Matthew

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              • I made a case for my air grinder to keep all the pieces in one place.

                Brian

                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                THINK HARDER

                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                Comment


                • OK I give up. What's the o-ring for?

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                  • Pulls it down to latch

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                    • [QUOTE=I'm going to make sure to change a few things though. If you look at the teeth, they're angled a bit on the inside ends because I used a 3/16" endmill. It doesn't seem to affect it, but that's not like the original, so I think an 1/8" endmill is in order. I'll also have them turn down the body to reduce the weight. This thing is heavy!!!

                      I made the same adapter recently and mine looked the same on the inside. I looked at the manual version that came with the mill and that portion had all been turned off. I left mine alone as it has no effect on the function, but you could turn that part off if it bothers you.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by strokersix
                        OK I give up. What's the o-ring for?
                        The cover slides in a groove cut in the inside of the case.

                        The O-ring hooks onto the little brass latch on the right in the picture.

                        I didn't have a proper latch on hand but I did have an O-ring so I improvised.

                        BTW. The first O-ring lasted for 20 years or so.

                        Brian
                        OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                        THINK HARDER

                        BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                        MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                        Comment


                        • [QUOTE=Robin R][QUOTE=I'm going to make sure to change a few things though. If you look at the teeth, they're angled a bit on the inside ends because I used a 3/16" endmill. It doesn't seem to affect it, but that's not like the original, so I think an 1/8" endmill is in order. I'll also have them turn down the body to reduce the weight. This thing is heavy!!!

                          I made the same adapter recently and mine looked the same on the inside. I looked at the manual version that came with the mill and that portion had all been turned off. I left mine alone as it has no effect on the function, but you could turn that part off if it bothers you.[/QUOTE]


                          ?????????????????????????????????????????????????? ????????????????????

                          Did this post end up here by accident?
                          OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                          THINK HARDER

                          BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                          MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                          Comment


                          • No. It's a response to my crank adapter for the knee on a Bridgeport in post #750.
                            Stuart de Haro

                            Comment


                            • Not sure...

                              ...if you can can classify a machine as a tool though I suppose technically... At any rate, I've been futzing for the last 5 years with the design and build of a CNC saw beveler to finish cut bamboo strips into tapered bamboo strips for eventual glue-up into bamboo fly fishing rods. Machine is almost complete. Framework is 8020 extrusions. All the rest is machined steel and aluminum. 2 axis CNC - X and Z axes. Run on Ubuntu and EMC2 software.



                              End view of the gantry with the spindles/motor housings. Piece down the middle is the vacuum hold down. Rack and pinion both sides, driven by two stepper motors. Z axis is single motor driven. Angles of the saws are adjustable so that I can make 4 sided, 5 sided, 6 sided (the most common rods) or any number sided rods. The spindle plates slide inward and outward to adjust the spacing between the saw blades dependent on the angle selected.



                              Vacuum hold-down gizmology. Foot switch for hands free vacuum activation, big reservoirs, and big pump.



                              Low tech solution to high tech problem - how to touch off the work piece with dual saws that don't meet in the middle? 60 degree wedge that drops down between the saws (which are set at 60 degree included angle). Depth of the point of the wedge is where the saws with theoretically "meet". Slide horizontal extension out, and touch off to top of work, and voila! Z axis is zereoed out!

                              For more pictures of the machine build in progress from the beginning of the build: http://clarksclassicflyrodforum.yuku.com/topic/22360

                              Mark

                              Comment


                              • 10m x 2.5mm acme tap

                                My Metric Southbend 10k lathe had a lot of lash in the compound feed and needed a new nut. I decided rather than single point cut it to make a tap.
                                I ground a 3/16" HSS tool bit to fit the threads of the compound feed screw. Then I took a length of 1/2" W1 drill rod and turned it down to 10mm and tapered
                                it and cut threads on it in the lathe.
                                Next I cut flutes in the threads and cut a 7/16" hex on end. I put in my pellet stove and heated it till it was a dull red colour and plunged it into cold water.
                                To temper it I put it in the oven at 425 degrees for an hour. With the wife's permission of course.

                                To make the nut I cut a 1 1/4" length of brass to .625" then cross drilled it and tapped it with my shop made tap.
                                I took my time with the tap and backed it out and cleaned it very often.
                                It took so much torque to turn the tap that it developed a substantial twist.
                                The feed screw is a little tight in the new nut but should wear in with a little use.

                                Terry

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