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  • Tube File

    I am pleased with my workshop efforts today. I wanted to remove the weld flash ridge thats inside the length of ERW tube so that I could fit a smaller close fitting tube so that it could slide smoothly. So this is how I did it and it worked out very well
    Alan
    (Click on images for description)



    Last edited by jackary; 05-09-2010, 12:35 PM.

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    • Originally posted by hornluv
      Here is an adapter for a drill to the knee crank on a Bridgeport. The material is 12L14, which is GREAT to machine BTW. The main body is 1.625" in diameter and 1.75" long, then there's the shank that fits in the drill chuck, which is .5" in diameter and 1" long with three flats .020" deep so it doesn't spin. The functional dimensions were just taken from the stock crank as far as depth and number of teeth (nine divisions makes the teeth, the cutter edge is set on the center line of the part), the diameter and depth of that counterbore (.950 diameter, .250" deep), and the size and depth of the hole (.625" diameter, 1.6" deep).


      When I mounted the DRO on the mill I got tired of cranking the knee up and down checking the alignment of the scale. I made one of those for my drill. On the drill shank I machined three flats so it would not spin in the drill chuck.
      After I had the DRO mounted I adapted it to fit into a 8 inch valve handle that I had here. The mill crank was ok but using the valve wheel worked a lot better for me. I still am able to use the crank in the event that I place something on the knee that will require more effort than I want to spend using the valve wheel.

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      • Flash ridge

        [QUOTE=jackary]I am pleased with my workshop efforts today. I wanted to remove the weld flash ridge thats inside the length of ERW tube so that I could fit a smaller close fitting tube so that it could slide smoothly. So this is how I did it and it worked out very well
        Alan
        (Click on images for description)




        That's a great idea. How long did it take to file out the flash?

        Regards, Matthew

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        • "To make the nut I cut a 1 1/4" length of brass to .625" then cross drilled it and tapped it with my shop made tap.
          I took my time with the tap and backed it out and cleaned it very often.
          It took so much torque to turn the tap that it developed a substantial twist.
          The feed screw is a little tight in the new nut but should wear in with a little use."

          Terry: I am sure it will wear in before too long. You might want to make another out of bronze. It will last a lot longer than brass. Gary P. Hansen
          In memory of Marine Engineer Paul Miller who gave his life for his country 7-19-2010 Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Freedom is not free, it is paid for with blood.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by wendtmk
            ...if you can can classify a machine as a tool though I suppose technically... At any rate, I've been futzing for the last 5 years with the design and build of a CNC saw beveler to finish cut bamboo strips into tapered bamboo strips for eventual glue-up into bamboo fly fishing rods. Machine is almost complete. Framework is 8020 extrusions. All the rest is machined steel and aluminum. 2 axis CNC - X and Z axes. Run on Ubuntu and EMC2 software.



            End view of the gantry with the spindles/motor housings. Piece down the middle is the vacuum hold down. Rack and pinion both sides, driven by two stepper motors. Z axis is single motor driven. Angles of the saws are adjustable so that I can make 4 sided, 5 sided, 6 sided (the most common rods) or any number sided rods. The spindle plates slide inward and outward to adjust the spacing between the saw blades dependent on the angle selected.



            Vacuum hold-down gizmology. Foot switch for hands free vacuum activation, big reservoirs, and big pump.



            Low tech solution to high tech problem - how to touch off the work piece with dual saws that don't meet in the middle? 60 degree wedge that drops down between the saws (which are set at 60 degree included angle). Depth of the point of the wedge is where the saws with theoretically "meet". Slide horizontal extension out, and touch off to top of work, and voila! Z axis is zereoed out!

            For more pictures of the machine build in progress from the beginning of the build: http://clarksclassicflyrodforum.yuku.com/topic/22360

            Mark


            How do you control the taper from butt to tip?

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            • Set up for sharpening engravers. Made a clamp that clamps on to a small geared DC motor. The clamp holds a swing arm and a half inch rod that is parallel to motors shaft.



              Engraver holding fixture that will allow setting of a left or right angle and a up or down angle. Fixture slides up or down on the half inch shaft and can rotate on the shaft. This is a design that copied of a commercial one seen on the net.



              Finished set up. Switch is for clockwise rotation / off / rotation the other direction.
              The aluminum backed diamond grinding wheel is meant for grinding on outer edge. Motor is slow speed of about 300 rpm and the load will be light. Thinking the diamond will only be used for shaping and the what ever material between the diamond and the hub seems like it will work for final polishing of the cutting edge.




              There is some of the motor shaft sticking about the grinding wheel. A piece of thin closed cell neoprene goes over this and then a diamond lap sits on top of this. This gives enough friction to drive the lap without slipping.

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              • Wire or parts holder for soldering. Started with 3/8” diameter ball bearings. Silver brazed a short section of 1/8” diameter bronze rod a little over 1” long.

                V-block set up in mill. Clamped short section of 1" brass rod. Center hole drilled for tapping 10-32 and two 17/64 holes each .285” from the center. No chamfer needed on the holes. Put in lathe and parted off. One of the side plates needed to be opened up for clearance for the 10-32 screw and the other side plate tapped. A short section of urethane tubing is squished between washer under screw head and side plate to act as a spring to hold tension on the balls.

                Quarter inch brass rod was drilled on each end for the 1/8” bronze rod to slide in and held with good old Loctite. Rod for clamp end was threaded 5-40.





                Clamps have a 5-40 female thread silver soldered to clamps so they can be changed if wanted. Couple of alligator clamps, hemostat clamp and a magnet



                Clamping tweezers has a magnet epoxied on which is attracted by magnet on clamp.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Rustybolt
                  How do you control the taper from butt to tip?
                  Not sure what you mean. The Z axis is what controls the cutting head in the vertical, and the gantry itself moves the length of the X axis. If I understand what you're asking, the Z axis controls the depth of the saw's cut, and the X axis determines the placement of that depth, so it's a combination of both.

                  Mark

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by garyphansen
                    "To make the nut I cut a 1 1/4" length of brass to .625" then cross drilled it and tapped it with my shop made tap.
                    I took my time with the tap and backed it out and cleaned it very often.
                    It took so much torque to turn the tap that it developed a substantial twist.
                    The feed screw is a little tight in the new nut but should wear in with a little use."

                    Terry: I am sure it will wear in before too long. You might want to make another out of bronze. It will last a lot longer than brass. Gary P. Hansen
                    I love working with bronze (932 to be exact) but hand tapping an acme thread in the stuff sucks! I made a couple of stepped, tapered tap to do the same job for our Clausing lathe. I broke 2 taps before I gave up and went to a different method. Why 932... it's indestructible. I use it to make repair parts for the clutch assemblies on our presses and also for our grinders.. So having a nice supply on hand is reason enough to use it elsewhere. Terry, very nice job.

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                    • taping bronze

                      Walter, can you tell us how you taped a bronze nut after you broke 2 home made taps?
                      Walt
                      toolman

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                      • Grinding wheel adapter puller

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                        • Standard size is .984" 16 TPI.

                          Dunno why they landed on that size!

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                          • ha.. got caught by that. Made one exactly 1.000... heck, that's what my calipers said it probably was. Even broke out my thread mics to get it dead on..

                            Off the lathe and .. test fit.. hmmm I must have messed up - too big. Check my work - still exactly 1.000....

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                            • ...and that's why I have two

                              Did exactly as you did on the first one and checked it numerous times with wires wondering why it didn't fit.

                              Got smart and did a little research prior to the second one...

                              Comment


                              • Here's a piloted spade bit I made for countersinking screws in gun stocks and pistol grips. I made it out of O1 and this one is specifically for a 1/4"-28 screw. I drill a pilot hole the size of the screw and then this bit follows that hole to produce a nicely finished countersunk hole. I found that by making little or no attempt to provide relief at the sides, the tool "burnishes" the sides of the hole to produce a very nice finish. For this type of task, this is a desirable trait. I probably wouldn't last very long if really working it but I use it a few times a year to do a 3/8" average deep countersink.



                                Here's a hole made by the same bit. This one is the grip screw in a one piece wood AR stock I whittled.

                                Last edited by Cobbler; 05-17-2010, 01:18 AM.
                                Video meliora proboque deteriora sequor

                                www.garagegunsmithing.com

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