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  • Cenedd
    replied
    Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
    Why are you using a diamond wheel on steel.
    Ah, that's an easy one. I'm using a diamond wheel.... because a diamond wheel is what I have.

    Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
    With coolant you may not ruin the diamond wheel
    I'm not aware of any sources saying this would be an issue. With excessive heat diamond theoretically dissolves in steel but not in the range of heat I'm likely to encounter unless I make a right hash of it....which is entirely possible It's a resin-bonded job not an electro-plated nickel solid wheel so it's intended to be friable/consumable to a certain extent....but you have to use it to do that rather than keep it in a drawer gathering dust.

    Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
    but an aluminum oxide wheel will do just as good of a job.
    I don't doubt that you're right...but I don't have one of those other than on a bench grinder and I have form at being terrible with one of those. I need something more finely controllable or I'll just make it worse. I'm not saying it isn't possible to do on a bench grinder; just that I'm fully aware of my skill-limitation. Frankly, if it comes to it, the learning curve is more valuable than the cost of the wheel.


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  • bborr01
    replied
    Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
    Finally something that fits the category! I saw a Joe Pieczynski video a while back on diamond grinding HSS on a mill. Obviously that went in my shopping basket and obviously I've done nothing with it for the last 18 months. Now, I've bought myself a nice set of 8 chisels for a project and standards aren't what they were in the 70's (when the other two 'identical' chisels I've got were made) and the backs need a LOT of flattening. It's still taking too long even on a 120 micron diamond plate (that's approx 140 grit). I know there are shortcuts involving a tiny back bevel but partly I want these as perfect as I can get them - they have sort of inherited sentimental value as they replace the missing ones out of my dad's set - and partly the back is so bad that one entire corner is unusable as is. Clearly the overkill solution would be a surface grinder....and I did look! There was even one of the mythical bench size variety available...but collection only from three hours drive away....and it's been very difficult to get fuel here in the UK for the last week of so. It would have needed work anyway as it looked like it was someone's self-build project. So I suddenly remembered I had this resin-bonded diamond wheel that just needed an arbor. One chunk of EN8 (roughly 1040 equivalent) later and here we go. Turned the shank first and then held that in the 20mm collet that it'll be running in to do the other side.



    Runout was....far from what I'd hoped it'd be. I'm not sure how much was my failure and how much was in the wheel but it clocked in at 0.3mm on the outside of the cone and the edge of the flat at the bottom. So I just chucked the whole lot back up in the lathe and trued it inside and out - the arbor's dedicated to this tool anyway so it won't be coming back off.




    There shall be some unimportant test piece tried first, of course....and much covering of things shall be done first
    What grit is it? Well, I guess we're going to find out as it's unspecified. Could be about 200-ish as other "D12A2" wheels seem to be. Gotta give these things a try.....even if it's just to find out that they don't work!
    Why are you using a diamond wheel on steel. I spent the last 10 years of my career grinding all sorts of stuff but diamond wheels only got used for carbide and occasionally M4 tool steel. With coolant you may not ruin the diamond wheel but an aluminum oxide wheel will do just as good of a job.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Yes, actual water, probably with a tiny bit of detergent in it to break the water tension and allow it to "wet" the surfaces.

    I have a Glendo accufinish, with a slow speed wheel on a horizontal axis, that grinds on the side. I give it a spray of water before I start, and it lasts until I am done. That is essentially a honing machine, so I do not need continuous drip

    Leave a comment:


  • Cenedd
    replied
    When you say "wet" do you specifically mean water? I have got an MQL mister now but so far have only been using it for air to clear the chips - works nicely for flycutting. I could load it with some (diluted) Tufcut Aqua that I have from when it was possible to buy the tiny bottles of the stuff. Or I could put water in it...or use a spray bottle as I was using when hand lapping. It's just a bit difficult to hand crank smoothly and spray with the other hand.

    Leave a comment:


  • TGTool
    replied
    John Stevenson commented on grinding steel with diamond. He did it without any visible issues and he was engaged with a Chinese company developing a benchtop endmill sharpener that finally came to market. It's a theoretical problem but more difficult to find in real life.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Grind them wet, and the heat issue goes away even more. Yes, somewhat of a problem with the wheel upside down like a Blanchard, and the work just a tiny edge, but at a slow speed won't likely be an issue anyway.

    Also, grinding steel with diamond has been done for a long time. If there was was that much of a problem, it would not have been done.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cenedd
    replied
    My understanding - from Tormek's video is that, like Elf said, it's only a problem at much higher heat levels. I've got to avoid that sort of heat for fear of wrecking the steel anyway so I think it should be ok. I'll be testing it first on a cheap modern Stanley chisel that's been horribly abused already so hopefully I should notice when I then sharpen it whether it seems softer.
    I've got a CCGT insert in CBN; it makes a very nice fly-cutter insert for hot-rolled steel with the mill scale still on.

    Leave a comment:


  • elf
    replied
    Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
    Caution: using a diamond wheel on steel is not a good idea. The steel (iron) absorbs the carbon from the diamonds and degrades the wheel.
    Yeah, seriously. Save the diamond for carbide tooling.
    If you want to work on steel, you will need CBN: cubic boron nitride, instead. You can get almost identical wheels in CBN from ebay. It does HSS steel very nicely. Go softly.
    I made my own T&C grinder, and use both diamond and CBN.

    Cheers
    Roger
    That would depend on the speed and heat generated.

    Leave a comment:


  • rcaffin
    replied
    Caution: using a diamond wheel on steel is not a good idea. The steel (iron) absorbs the carbon from the diamonds and degrades the wheel.
    Yeah, seriously. Save the diamond for carbide tooling.
    If you want to work on steel, you will need CBN: cubic boron nitride, instead. You can get almost identical wheels in CBN from ebay. It does HSS steel very nicely. Go softly.
    I made my own T&C grinder, and use both diamond and CBN.

    Cheers
    Roger

    Leave a comment:


  • ezduzit
    replied
    C--looks very useful.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cenedd
    replied
    Finally something that fits the category! I saw a Joe Pieczynski video a while back on diamond grinding HSS on a mill. Obviously that went in my shopping basket and obviously I've done nothing with it for the last 18 months. Now, I've bought myself a nice set of 8 chisels for a project and standards aren't what they were in the 70's (when the other two 'identical' chisels I've got were made) and the backs need a LOT of flattening. It's still taking too long even on a 120 micron diamond plate (that's approx 140 grit). I know there are shortcuts involving a tiny back bevel but partly I want these as perfect as I can get them - they have sort of inherited sentimental value as they replace the missing ones out of my dad's set - and partly the back is so bad that one entire corner is unusable as is. Clearly the overkill solution would be a surface grinder....and I did look! There was even one of the mythical bench size variety available...but collection only from three hours drive away....and it's been very difficult to get fuel here in the UK for the last week of so. It would have needed work anyway as it looked like it was someone's self-build project. So I suddenly remembered I had this resin-bonded diamond wheel that just needed an arbor. One chunk of EN8 (roughly 1040 equivalent) later and here we go. Turned the shank first and then held that in the 20mm collet that it'll be running in to do the other side.



    Runout was....far from what I'd hoped it'd be. I'm not sure how much was my failure and how much was in the wheel but it clocked in at 0.3mm on the outside of the cone and the edge of the flat at the bottom. So I just chucked the whole lot back up in the lathe and trued it inside and out - the arbor's dedicated to this tool anyway so it won't be coming back off.




    There shall be some unimportant test piece tried first, of course....and much covering of things shall be done first
    What grit is it? Well, I guess we're going to find out as it's unspecified. Could be about 200-ish as other "D12A2" wheels seem to be. Gotta give these things a try.....even if it's just to find out that they don't work!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bruno Mueller
    replied
    I made a little video about the possibilities of the Bosch-Combi lathe.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xJEtpNKyQI&t=177s

    Leave a comment:


  • Cenedd
    replied
    Think I found the video. https://youtu.be/AZkP1uiMzJk?t=156
    I'm sure there's been a follow up with more info on stops but it gives you the gist Also found a blog post on the mini pallet: http://oxtool.blogspot.com/2012/12/c...nists.html?m=1
    Hope it's of some help/interest. Plenty of other interesting/useful stuff on his channel too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cenedd
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave94Lightning View Post
    I'm about to make this simple tool but wanted some opinions before building it.
    You might want to have a browse through Tom Lipton's YouTube channel Ox Tools as I'm sure he's done just this using a mini pallet. The key point in his design was a stop to prevent over-rotation - partly to prevent taking a chunk out the face you don't want to damage and partly for safety if it grabs. Mini pallet is definitely on my round toit list - for the rotary table mainly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave94Lightning
    replied
    I'm about to make this simple tool but wanted some opinions before building it. It is an idea I had for a simple radius cutter for some aluminum axle blocks that I fabricate on my mill. The jig would be plastic (3D printed) with an aluminum locating Pin and Aluminum handle. The bottom of the locating pin would be placed in the vise jaws and thus allow the jig to be rotated horizontally via the handle. The part to be cut (Blue) would be placed in the jig and the handle rotated to allow the endmill to cut the radius. Let me know if you think this would work well.

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