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  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Here's something a little different. A swing weight scale I just finished last night.





    While I know it's a stretch to be included in this thread, It is a tool, and I did make it in my shop .

    For those who don't know what it is, it's a scale to measure the "heft" or "swing weight" of a golf club. This is a copy of Dave Tutelman's design with a few changes to suit material I had on hand. All the design and engineering info can be found here if you're interested. he can explain it much better than I can. https://www.tutelman.com/golf/measur...eightScale.php

    This all started because I told my (6'5") Nephew I'd build him a set of golf clubs to fit his height. While researching I learned that if you extend clubs, you must counterweight them to maintain the same swing weight. Well, how can I maintain swing weight if I can't measure it*......so here we are.... I also machined a mold to pour lead counterweights. Don't have a pic of it, but will take some when I pour the weights. Hoping to have the club build wrapped up this weekend. Next build is a loft/lie machine to check and bend clubs. It's a slippery slope I tell ya. But it's fun.

    *There are other ways to measure swing weight, but none as fun and time consuming as building a specialized tool for it. One way is here https://www.hirekogolf.com/golf-club...ght-calculator

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  • pensioner
    replied
    Noitoen thanks for the idea!
    I have already made such a demagnetizer, just now, I just cut off the magnetic core a little, added a switch and placed it in the body of the old adapter. Works Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20210915_135028.jpg Views:	9 Size:	703.0 KB ID:	1961403 Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20210915_135349.jpg Views:	9 Size:	790.7 KB ID:	1961404 Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20210915_135124.jpg Views:	9 Size:	727.3 KB ID:	1961405
    Last edited by pensioner; 09-15-2021, 08:58 AM.

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  • Noitoen
    replied
    Originally posted by Arcane View Post
    The other day I needed to use two wrenches to tighten a bolt holding a part onto my faceplate so I grabbed a wrench out of my tool box to use in conjunction with the one I keep right at the lath. I set it down in the swarf tray and when I picked it up, it was fuzzy with chips! Somewhere the darn thing had gotten magnetized. Don't know where, don't know when, but it was a PITA. I really do not like anything magnetized around my lathe or mill.
    Newer washing machine pumps have a "U" core with 1 coil and a magnetic rotor inside a plastic housing without shaft seals. If you remove the rotor housing, you are left with the bare core with a slight gap. This makes a very good demagnetizer.
    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.

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  • Arcane
    replied
    The other day I needed to use two wrenches to tighten a bolt holding a part onto my faceplate so I grabbed a wrench out of my tool box to use in conjunction with the one I keep right at the lath. I set it down in the swarf tray and when I picked it up, it was fuzzy with chips! Somewhere the darn thing had gotten magnetized. Don't know where, don't know when, but it was a PITA. I really do not like anything magnetized around my lathe or mill.

    Leave a comment:


  • rcaffin
    replied
    Oil on the metal items will soak into the wood holders and never dry. This is fine. But said oil also holds onto dust and grit. So it's wise to finish the wood in a drying oil such as boiled linseed or . . .
    Ah yes, sand and dust. Sadly, I have that.
    But I avoid most of that with the plastic lid. I wipe the collet when I take it out of the box and before I put it back. That seems to work fine.

    With Australian hardwoods, which are not highly absorbent, I prefer to have an unfinished surface, loose oil and a slightly loose fit for the holes.

    Cheers
    Roger

    Leave a comment:


  • Cenedd
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    I like the idea of the embedded magnets with non magnetic surrounding. That way the chips that stick to the magnets allow the swarf to be wiped away off the sides. Otherwise I don't like to use magnets around my machines due to the difficulties in keep them clean.
    I can see how it might work if you're only doing aluminium (or exclusively anything non-magnetic) but I think I'll pass. Slowly trying to get rind of anything magnetic that I eagerly put in previously. Partly I do steels and as BCRider says, it causes a right pain....but also everything you have ends up magnetised. Softjaws held onto the vise with magnets? Magnetised hacksaw blade covered in swarf. I think the mag-bars that I (try!) to keep my regular use spanners (like collet holder and clampdown nut sizes) on will stay but the softjaws got replaced by a high-infill PETG print that slides on from the end of the jaw and wraps around four sides of it to stay in place.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    I like the idea of the embedded magnets with non magnetic surrounding. That way the chips that stick to the magnets allow the swarf to be wiped away off the sides. Otherwise I don't like to use magnets around my machines due to the difficulties in keep them clean.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave94Lightning
    replied
    Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
    Aw Dave, what are you doing to my 'when I get round to it' list?! You've set the bar pretty high too. Have you thought about adding some sides to the top face so that the things you probably shouldn't be putting down on the table, but do, don't roll off? The screw heads might already be enough, but just a thought.
    Haha. My list is super long too. The prior versions of the table covers I built were 3D printed plastic with Inset neodymium magnets that held the covers to the mill table. The power of the magnets would hold any endmills, collets or tooling that I placed on the table very securely. It works really well having the extra magnetized workspace and since I only really Mill aluminum it didn't create a mess.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    Plastics and metals can collect water. It's most likely the collets that would do it in the case shown. But the combination of metal tools and a wood holder seems to work well in the usual sorts of medium to high humidity.

    I wasn't going the theorize, but I will..... the surface of the metal or plastic holder is often smooth, neatly made to conform to the surface of what it is holding. So condensation can wick in, and then does not evaporate quickly. Wood has a rougher surface, and may let any condensation evaporate more easily, not holding water by wicking action.

    Wood won't help you if your shop is open and under a dock at the seashore, however. There are limits. Damp wood will definitely cause rust if in contact with steel, but wood may wick away minor amounts of water into the wood, away from the metal.

    Wood, once dried, tends to maintain a low water content even in high humidity environments.
    Some additional thoughts on using wood as tool holders and cases that Jerry's post brought up in my mind.

    Some woods have strong rust causing tanins in the wood makeup. So those should be avoided. Red oak is one that jumps to my mind but there are others and I'm sure a little checking around will suggest those to avoid.

    The bit about the tools fitting tight in the wood pockets does raise a good concern. First off wood and some plastics do in fact take in moisture from the air. And under a change in conditions expel the moisture. Wood "breathes" moisture. It doesn't generate it but it responds to local changes in temperature and humidity to take in and give out this moisture. So the holes or other cutouts for tools should not be so snug that air cannot get in and aid with carrying away said moisture. There's another reason the holes or cutouts should not be a tight fit. Wood swells and shrinks across the grain with changes in humidity. A perfect fit when made can become a death grip on the item under the wrong conditions. So don't make the fits super close. Give the parts in the holders/cases some rattle room to aid with both issues.

    Oil on the metal items will soak into the wood holders and never dry. This is fine. But said oil also holds onto dust and grit. So it's wise to finish the wood in a drying oil such as boiled linseed or polymerized tung or multiple coats of the thinned down paint store style "tung" or "danish" oil finishes. Or a quicker option is two or three coats of thinned down polyurethane varnish or thinned oil based paint. Thinning these products increases the soaking in factor and reduces how much they build up and make cavities tighter. Thinning the products also speeds up the drying time provided you paint the items and then wipe away any excess pooling in the cavities.

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  • Cenedd
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave94Lightning View Post
    Here are some mill table covers I made for my Little Machine Shop 5500 series mill. 6061 Aluminum.
    Aw Dave, what are you doing to my 'when I get round to it' list?! You've set the bar pretty high too. Have you thought about adding some sides to the top face so that the things you probably shouldn't be putting down on the table, but do, don't roll off? The screw heads might already be enough, but just a thought.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
    There is a problem with such holders, at least here in Sydney, Aus. If the humidity is medium-high, you can get a slight amount of moisture building up between the collet and the holder, and over time that becomes rust. Very distressing, and much effort needed to remove it safely.

    I ended up with a more conventional 'rack' for the collets, made of hardwood and enclosed in a box also made of hardwood, with a clear plastic lid (well, moderately clear, as it was second-hand). Yes, wood could get damp too, but not when it has been soaked in oil! And I keep a block of camphor inside the box to further prevent any rust. The combination seems to work. ER25 set plus ER11 set.

    .....................

    Cheers
    Roger
    Plastics and metals can collect water. It's most likely the collets that would do it in the case shown. But the combination of metal tools and a wood holder seems to work well in the usual sorts of medium to high humidity.

    I wasn't going the theorize, but I will..... the surface of the metal or plastic holder is often smooth, neatly made to conform to the surface of what it is holding. So condensation can wick in, and then does not evaporate quickly. Wood has a rougher surface, and may let any condensation evaporate more easily, not holding water by wicking action.

    Wood won't help you if your shop is open and under a dock at the seashore, however. There are limits. Damp wood will definitely cause rust if in contact with steel, but wood may wick away minor amounts of water into the wood, away from the metal.

    Wood, once dried, tends to maintain a low water content even in high humidity environments.

    Last edited by J Tiers; 09-13-2021, 01:01 PM.

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  • Dave94Lightning
    replied
    Here are some mill table covers I made for my Little Machine Shop 5500 series mill. 6061 Aluminum.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
    Would plastic work? I am sure it would - with added oil of course to displace any moisture. You would need a large block though. Could be $$.
    I think you nailed it. Winters are not always about the cold. You can dye of dehydration in the dead od winter also, JR

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  • rcaffin
    replied
    It's a single bit of hardwood, left over from building our house I think. Great fun with sharp (ie aluminium) milling cutters of various sizes.
    The clear plastic lid (visible at the top) fits into the recess at the top edges. A tab sticks out at the left to make it easy to select the collet I want.
    As you can see, the holes are all labeled in sequence, and the collets are metric. The holes at the LH end are for additional 6, 10 & 12 mm, as these are the main shank sizes from the R8 days.
    The collets at the RH edge are imperial. The ones across the top are ER11. Sometimes you need a smaller collet holder to get into corners.

    Would plastic work? I am sure it would - with added oil of course to displace any moisture. You would need a large block though. Could be $$.

    I used wood because I tend to have a bit of it lying around for free - we live on a farm. The camphor is not shown in the photo: a block of it wrapped up in AlFoil with a small hole in the top. With the lid in place the vapour tends to accumulate nicely.

    Cheers
    Roger

    Leave a comment:


  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
    There is a problem with such holders, at least here in Sydney, Aus. If the humidity is medium-high, you can get a slight amount of moisture building up between the collet and the holder, and over time that becomes rust. Very distressing, and much effort needed to remove it safely.

    I ended up with a more conventional 'rack' for the collets, made of hardwood and enclosed in a box also made of hardwood, with a clear plastic lid (well, moderately clear, as it was second-hand). Yes, wood could get damp too, but not when it has been soaked in oil! And I keep a block of camphor inside the box to further prevent any rust. The combination seems to work. ER25 set plus ER11 set.

    Getting the sticky labels to 'stick' to the oily wood was the hard part!

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    Cheers
    Roger
    Very nicely done, would UHMW or High Density Plastic collect moisture like wood, my thoughts would be no.

    Leave a comment:

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