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  • Originally posted by HAP
    Harvey, that is one sweet little vise! Are they still available somewhere? Would like to pick one up.
    Nice idea.
    HAP
    That's the Starrett #86 Combination Hand Vise. You sometimes see them on EvilBay...I picked up an unmarked one several years ago for a "lot" less than the Starrett, and it's exactly identical otherwise.

    David
    David Kaiser
    “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
    ― Robert A. Heinlein

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    • Originally posted by HAP
      Harvey, that is one sweet little vise! Are they still available somewhere? Would like to pick one up.
      Nice idea.
      HAP
      Amazon shows a couple available, 183.60, not cheap. Mine came from Ebay and it doesn't have the auxiliary clamp. I don't think these are being made by Starrett anymore, but I could be wrong.


      http://www.amazon.com/Starrett-Combi...3905542&sr=8-2

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      • Originally posted by bborr01
        This is something most of you have probably already seen or used, but here it is anyway.

        It is just a piece of 1/4 inch cold rolled rod with a slot cut in the end with a band saw or hack saw. I have used it to take burrs out of holes and the like.

        You can pick your grit of sandpaper. Use either strips ripped from cloth sandpaper or use the stuff that comes on a roll.

        As the sandpaper gets loaded up or gets dull, just rip the bad part off and it is like new again.

        I have used it mostly in a cordless drill.

        If you decide to use it in an air grinder, I would recommend making it shorter and be VERY CAREFUL as the spindle speed of an air grinder could turn it into a bent rod and a real hazardous tool.

        I use something very similar on a lathe to polish up the inside of bored holes but, I use a wooden dowel rod in case it makes contact with the par. Less chance to damage the part.

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        • I find these real handy when doing a lot of tool changes on the lathe. Lathe Bob


          Have sold many now through ebay.

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          • Nice, that's a new one fo me.

            Couple of observations:

            The toolbit should be level

            The closer the bit to the stock the more sensitive the level will be to height differences

            Oh, and the level needs to be at 45 deg to the V faces.

            What do you call it?

            Originally posted by Dieselrider
            I find these real handy when doing a lot of tool changes on the lathe. Lathe Bob


            Have sold many now through ebay.

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            • Originally posted by noah katz

              What do you call it?

              "Lathe Bob"

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              • Attempt(s) at trying to copy an old hand vice (vise) that Rivett608 showed on the PM board.





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                • Nice vise! Very small and intricate.

                  Here is a NMTB 30 tool holder with a 3/4 inch hole I made last week. I know I could buy one of these for $25 hardened and ground but, I am cheap I Know.

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                  • Originally posted by Dieselrider
                    Nice vise! Very small and intricate.

                    Here is a NMTB 30 tool holder with a 3/4 inch hole I made last week. I know I could buy one of these for $25 hardened and ground but, I am cheap I Know.
                    Dieselrider,

                    You will get more satisfaction from the shop made arbor than the Chinese one.

                    Sometimes there is more to it than money.

                    Brian
                    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                    THINK HARDER

                    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                    • I've had an old PanaVise for a while and never thought much of it. I finally brought it in to work and once I had cleaned it up I decided that I really like how well it worked. I decided to make a way to attach it to my large Starrett #119 bench block, like I did with my #86 vise in post 975. I also discovered that I had a pin vise that would mount in the base of the PanaVise, so I also made an adapter for the #86.







                      I used .75" diameter rare earth magnets to hold the base to the block. Way to much holding power. I will probably make a center bolt that holds it all together.

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                      • Originally posted by noah katz
                        Nice, that's a new one fo me.
                        There's a couple versions of that "lathe bob" for sale on page 6 of the current HSM mag. They're from http://ValidusGroup.com.

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                        • Originally posted by dp
                          There's a couple versions of that "lathe bob" for sale on page 6 of the current HSM mag. They're from http://ValidusGroup.com.
                          Yes they sell on eBay too. Only with theirs you have to dial the tool bit all the way out from the part to use just the very tip of the gauge on the tip of the tool bit. Mine allows for a lot less cranking of the handle-at least in some circumstances. And on some of the smaller lathes, there may not be enough travel to give their tool the room it needs to work.

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                          • Dial Indicator Clamp to fit the my 13" LeBlond (circa 1942).



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                            • Originally posted by Harvey Melvin Richards
                              I've had an old PanaVise for a while and never thought much of it. I finally brought it in to work and once I had cleaned it up I decided that I really like how well it worked. I decided to make a way to attach it to my large Starrett #119 bench block, like I did with my #86 vise in post 975. I also discovered that I had a pin vise that would mount in the base of the PanaVise, so I also made an adapter for the #86.

                              I used .75" diameter rare earth magnets to hold the base to the block. Way to much holding power. I will probably make a center bolt that holds it all together.

                              I thought I was the only guy in the world who chose to own the No.119 Bench Block over the smaller No.129 (which doesn't have the nice hex casting to hold it in a vise when needed.) They do seem to be somewhat rare, though I like them better than the small one. Here it lives, in one of my "junk" drawers:

                              Last edited by PixMan; 01-24-2011, 11:57 AM.

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                              • Lots of odd ball stuff.

                                One red dot - simple wax press. Fill cavity with wax, press on ram, and out squirts a nice small ribbon of wax. Smaller brass part is threaded into the hole at front if you need small #4 of #6 tapped holes). Need to tap 200 blind holes, it will save your bacon.

                                two dot - simple index fixture. 72 tooth gear wheel makes rapid work. Tip, wipe gear clean. Use a sharpie to make index points, wipe off with alcohol when done.

                                three dot -- simple scribe, current weekend project.

                                four dot -- big block of aluminum. It is small fixture plate. Just drill and tap as needed, couple of 6061 bar clamps to hold think parts.

                                Number 5 - die holder.

                                Number 6 - hammer. Yes, used on the mill (index), brass head. 4130 tubing, claw foot it 1" wide (fits a collet depth stop), and 3/8" wide to fit draw bar. Long enough to give the right leverage on pulling up a collet snug.

                                Number 7 - couple of machinist clamps. Ya, rust never sleeps.

                                Number 8 - Broken tap. Grind to a nice sharp tip... excellent little punch!

                                Number 9 - if you have the die, make your own tap! Needed 14mm x 1.50mm for a project. Thread up some o-1, machine in your cutting groove. Heat treat.

                                Letter A - just plain 1" steel rod, machine a flat bottom, with a 1/4" hole in it. Yep, tapping guide.

                                Letter B (Aloris tool post holder).

                                Letter C. darn hard to see. It is a pilot countersink for a cap head screw. Commercial ones have too big of a counter sink. O1 Rod, machine, heat and toss into old oil.
                                Last edited by roundrocktom; 01-23-2011, 11:05 AM.

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