Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shop Made Tools

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Here is a hammer one of my students made last year. It is exactly to print. The head is W1 and the handle is 1045. The knurling is quite fine otherwise it tends to shred the the hands.



    -DU-

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Void
      Here is a hammer one of my students made last year. It is exactly to print. The head is W1 and the handle is 1045. The knurling is quite fine otherwise it tends to shred the the hands.



      -DU-
      As a newbie trying to teach myself this stuff, this begs the question... what book is that?
      ----
      Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

      Comment


      • Originally posted by madwilliamflint
        As a newbie trying to teach myself this stuff, this begs the question... what book is that?
        The book is "Machine Shop Projects" by South Bend Lathe Works (Now published by Lindsay Books.) It is the companion volume to "How to Run a Lathe" (also by South Bend) Also available HERE.

        Some of the projects require castings that used to be supplied by South Bend. Most do not.

        It is a very "old school" book... which isn't necessarily a bad thing. Most of the drawings lack tolerances. Many are in fractional units. Some of the symbols are obsolete. I usually have the students re-draw each project to more modern standards before making the part. It really helps for the student to understand where tolerances and fits and whatnot are critical and where they are not. Once the tolerances have been decided there is also the problem of how to attain them.

        The key feature of the book is not the drawings but the text. To the right of each drawing is a "schedule of operations" which clearly states which operation is done and in which order. All operations with an * next to them are references to the HtRaL book. I also have the students re-write the schedule for our particular machines and tooling. For a beginner the schedule is one of the most important things to learn. It is all to easy to machine-yourself-into-a-corner otherwise. If you make the hammer that is in the book you will see what I mean.

        Fortunately the pages are standard "letter" size so I can photocopy the pages.

        The student who made that hammer is a fastidious worker. I am happy to say that no parts were scrapped in making the hammer. There was lots of discussion and planning on exactly how to do each operation. All work was done between centers or dialed in on a 4-jaw. The ball end was freehanded then filed. The radius on the handle neck was freehanded then filed. He is now pursuing a masters in Mechanical Engineering at Rutgers.

        Considering how much work was involved making that hammer it is a completely economically impractical way to make a such a tool. Same thing can be said for most of the projects in the book. Exceptions are things like the Morse Taper Plug and Socket Gage. To buy a set is very expensive. To make a set it pretty cheap, a good exercise, and always useful in the shop.

        Some pics:




        -DU-

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Void
          The book is "Machine Shop Projects" by South Bend Lathe Works (Now published by Lindsay Books.) It is the companion volume to "How to Run a Lathe" (also by South Bend) Also available HERE.
          ...
          The key feature of the book is not the drawings but the text. To the right of each drawing is a "schedule of operations" which clearly states which operation is done and in which order.
          ...
          -DU-
          Indeed. It was the list of operations that induced me to ask about it. It looks like a refreshingly clear approach. I don't like my whys mixed in with my whats.

          Thanks very much. Those go on my post-move short list.
          ----
          Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

          Comment


          • Just darned nice workmanship in this category!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Void
              Here is a hammer one of my students made last year. It is exactly to print. The head is W1 and the handle is 1045. The knurling is quite fine otherwise it tends to shred the the hands.



              -DU-
              Boy that sure looks familiar! I know where the drawing originated now. The school I am attending has a Drafting class. My shop teacher had 6 different prints of that hammer made. Each version has different measurements. All combination of metric, fractions and decimal measurements with most missing. I am making a tap wrench now. Does that book have a drawing for one?

              Comment


              • Drawbar Hammer

                Drawhttp://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g423/sabu386/IMG_4019.jpgbar Hammer built from inspiration from this site. The hammer's handle radius washer adds a nice finish. Knurled handle cut with aloris no.19.

                Comment


                • Draw Bar hammer

                  Second pic.

                  Comment


                  • How did you do the internal hex?

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by deltaenterprizes
                      How did you do the internal hex?
                      Looks like a bought & modified deep socket tool to me.

                      Comment


                      • Me too....That knurled ring near the end looks Ed Zachary like the couple of NAPA sockets I have



                        Andy

                        Comment


                        • Really nice job on the hammers guys.

                          Swordfish
                          I like the washer idea, gives it a neat appearance. Did you just tap it into the side of the socket or all the way through? Or did you pit something inside to thread into?

                          Dave

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by H380
                            Boy that sure looks familiar! I know where the drawing originated now. The school I am attending has a Drafting class. My shop teacher had 6 different prints of that hammer made. Each version has different measurements. All combination of metric, fractions and decimal measurements with most missing.
                            Yep. In fact I made the exact same hammer in my HS shop class 40 years ago. It came out just as nice. Someone pinched it from me about 30 years ago :-(. Most all of the shop projects were tools of some sort. The only one I have left is one of my own design, a ring mandrel. All the others were pinched.

                            Some of the tools are worth re-scaling if you want a different size. The MT gages were originally for MT3. Mine is MT2. The hammer could easily be made in three or more different sizes.

                            I am making a tap wrench now. Does that book have a drawing for one?
                            Yes, in fact, it does have a tap wrench. It is near identical to a Starrett No. 91 series wrench. Definitely worth making in a half dozen sizes.

                            -DU-

                            Comment


                            • internal hex

                              The hammer is made from a NAPA socket. It was surprisingly easy to drill and tap. With the radius washer I was able to have full threads all the way through one side of the socket and the handle threads were left extremely tight going into the socket along with blue locktite. This is a single purpose hammer obviously and thus far it has held up well. Had it failed plan B was to make a threaded insert to fit inside the socket. I have made half a dozen projects inspired or shamelessly copied from this thread. Thanks to all that have contributed. No project too small.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by swordfish
                                The hammer is made from a NAPA socket. It was surprisingly easy to drill and tap. With the radius washer I was able to have full threads all the way through one side of the socket and the handle threads were left extremely tight going into the socket along with blue locktite. This is a single purpose hammer obviously and thus far it has held up well. Had it failed plan B was to make a threaded insert to fit inside the socket. I have made half a dozen projects inspired or shamelessly copied from this thread. Thanks to all that have contributed. No project too small.
                                Swordfish,

                                No shame in copying things from this thread.

                                That was my inspiration for starting it. Sharing ideas.

                                Brian
                                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                                THINK HARDER

                                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X