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  • BCRider
    replied
    Matti has a point. Both the keyless chucks on my drill press and my lathe tail stock are the style you have in your pictures. They both slip on tap shanks with even sizes like 1/4 or 6mm when they are just getting started. I get about two turns with a taper tap. Basically enough to ensure a good start only on those sizes. And for sure they will turn open with any attempt to use them in reverse. So even backing through the usual burr during hand tapping is likely enough torque to kick them loose. At least the two like yours that I have will act like that.

    If you want a keyless instead of a keyed chuck you might consider a chuck off a hand drill. They are some other style of design and they seem to produce more locking pressure and tolerate reverse loads. The key... sorry... to them working seems to be that they do not spin the jaws around with the tightening barrel the same way as the Albrecht clones.

    On the other hand this would be the perfect spot to use one of the keyed Jacobs style chucks that we all seem to have squirrelled away.

    I love the idea of a universal tool arm on the drill press like this. I think it'll come in handy for more than just tapping.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    Good idea. you might find out that the keyless chuck doesnt have enough grip in tougher materials and that it occasionally loosens on reverse. That is at least my experience with tapping and keyless chucks.

    Leave a comment:


  • rcaffin
    replied
    Look what happens when someone is left with time on his hands ... 😊

    Aluminium pistons: that's cast Al, and it is a lot harder than the likes of 6060.
    Protective bushing: can I suggest something a bit squooshy, like a soft plastic? I have done similar myself. Even a bit of high density PU CCF would be good.

    Cheers
    Roger

    Leave a comment:


  • Galaxie
    replied
    I like it. You've basically turned your drill press into a large "universal pillar tool"

    Leave a comment:


  • ref-mj
    replied
    Covid work... I dont tap a ton but often enough. Been thinking about making a tapping tool for a few months. A few weeks ago I though, "why not on the drill?" I hate tapping on the drill and suck at freehand so I had some junk lying around that I realized would be a great start.

    Column attachment: Random Taiwanese drill press table to column mount I got out of the scrap bin at work last year. Bonus is it has angular adjustment.
    Quill: 1" DOM tube 1/2" ID.
    Bushings: Random aluminum piston from a hydraulic cylinder.
    Chuck: I'm a moron and ordered a cheap MT2 last year when my lathe takes MT3 to try out a keyless chuck. It sat for a year, now I get to use it.

    1:Took apart, chucked and turned the ID of the clamping surface to around 3.5", 0.005 or 0.010" over the column. Fits good, clamps on both sides.

    2: Cut and chucked the 1" bar in the lathe and worked on cutting the MT2 on the ID. The thin side was about 0.59" on the drill chuck so I bored it to about the depth of the chuck taper then slowly worked with a boring bar on the taper. Math says like 1.43 degrees so set the angle pretty close but eyes only do so much. Then cut .005 or so extra in the mid to make the effective taper the front and rear about 3/4" on each side. Polished the bar with abrasives to make it shiny inside and out. Fits nicely.

    3: Took the random aluminum piston and cut two bushings for the quill. Aluminum isn't really the best for this but I had it and they turned out good. Slide in tight on each side and there is a clamp on the front too so they wont pop out. Quill slides through quite nicely.

    4: Today I worked on making a handle. Basically cut a ring about 5/8" thick from 1.5" OD 1"ID tube. Faced the ends, drilled a hole and tapped one side. Then drilled the bottom (moron) of the quill for the ring to slide over. The ring will have the handles welded to it. Then I picked it up, slid the ring on and realized in my infinite wisdom drilled through the tapered side. Oh well. Re-drilled in the proper spot. Looks stupid but it still works. Tomorrow I will probably finish the handles. Then I will paint and install it. Maybe get a spring. I need to at least put a bushing between the handle and arm so if dropped it doesnt hammer the bushings.

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    Attached Files
    Last edited by ref-mj; 04-17-2020, 12:44 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    Ya, parallelism is a bugger if you weld it and rigidity isn't that great if they are just screwed into position.
    Harold Hall has one that uses a round bar as the keying and alignment element and to take the pitching forces from a cut. For a smaller lathe or one used more lightly I think it would be fine. But there's a lot of pressure on lines of contact instead of areas of contact if heavier work is done.

    http://homews.co.uk/page508.html

    I do like the idea that we could drill then ream some holes easily enough without the need for serious milling of dovetails. The trick is to do it in a way that we achieve a very mechanically sound. But as soon as I see it pulling a holder into place I see lines of contact instead of areas of contact.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    I've seen people use that method for indicator holders and bearings for truing work before.

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    Yes, it's been done before. It's fairly easy to do if you can weld. The alignment can be a hassle, but you can machine it in place by cutting the pocket for the tool by using an endmill in the chuck.

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • challenger
    replied
    No. I'm talking about using two pieces of round bar to create a mock dovetail. I have a piece in the photo clamped to the TP with 2 pieces of round bar. Maybe it makes more sense?
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Cenedd
    replied
    Originally posted by challenger View Post
    Anyone make a QCTH using round bar to create the "dovetail?
    Do you mean something like this?
    or this
    Last edited by Cenedd; 04-15-2020, 12:52 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • flathead4
    replied
    Originally posted by challenger View Post
    Anyone make a QCTH using round bar to create the "dovetail?
    I saw a threading stop made with round bar. But a threading stop has almost no force applied to it when in use unlike a tool post that could have a considerable amount.

    Leave a comment:


  • challenger
    replied
    Anyone make a QCTH using round bar to create the "dovetail?

    Leave a comment:


  • Cenedd
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    I have a number of things that I've used such G wrenches ....even the claw style as used on some ER collet nuts.
    Pure chance should dictate that those claw style wrenches should slot straight on when offered up at least once in a while....but no! The only advantage I can think the pin-style wrench may have is that it might be wieldable in a tighter space - especially with more than 4 holes. A hex would offer similar benefits though.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    I have a number of things that I've used such G wrenches for but I'm not that big a fan of them. A bit slow and clumsy to place. I'd far rather use a hex, octagonal or even the claw style as used on some ER collet nuts.

    Of course the one good thing about G wrenches is that they are at least easy to make in just about any size.

    Leave a comment:


  • DennisCA
    replied
    Here is the web archive version of the original project I got this from:
    https://web.archive.org/web/20180312...ock/index.html

    The screw is supposed to have 4 holes for a wrench.

    Leave a comment:

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