Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shop Made Tools

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by tsmartin_98
    More pics.





    That's freakin brilliant. I'm steeling that idea. I've got some 2" tubing to cut internal threads in the ends of...I can scrounge up the stuff to do it this way cheaper than buying a tap.

    Comment


    • Yes, it is quite good. I'm stealing it myself, but trying to find an idea to modify it so as not to need an expensive chuck in the middle.
      Vitَria, Brazil

      Comment


      • Originally posted by lbhsbz
        That's freakin brilliant. I'm steeling that idea. I've got some 2" tubing to cut internal threads in the ends of...I can scrounge up the stuff to do it this way cheaper than buying a tap.
        Internal threading crossed my mind as well. Let us know how it turns out.

        TS

        Comment


        • Originally posted by davidwdyer
          Yes, it is quite good. I'm stealing it myself, but trying to find an idea to modify it so as not to need an expensive chuck in the middle.
          You might try making a 3 or 4 "jaw" cathead. Then use a dial indicator to get it in line with the headstock. A co-ax would work great for that.

          TS

          Comment


          • Originally posted by tsmartin_98
            Internal threading crossed my mind as well. Let us know how it turns out.

            TS
            I wonder how that would work turning the OD of long shaft, like an
            axle for bearings. Haven't tried ( I guess trepanning ) something like
            that.
            ...lew...

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Lew Hartswick
              I wonder how that would work turning the OD of long shaft, like an
              axle for bearings. Haven't tried ( I guess trepanning ) something like
              that.
              ...lew...
              Reverse the boring bar in the head, cutting face of the boring bar pointing in, and run the spindle in reverse. Be careful if your boring head is threaded as it could unscrew itself. I had to turn the ends of a 2" solid square about 2' long down to 1 1/2" several years ago. I didn't have this set up at the time. I used a milling attachment and a lot of patience getting it centered then used a hole saw to remove the bulk of the OD. A reversed boring bar with the lathe also running reverse cleaned up the OD.

              TS

              Comment


              • Originally posted by tsmartin_98
                Reverse the boring bar in the head, cutting face of the boring bar pointing in, and run the spindle in reverse. Be careful if your boring head is threaded as it could unscrew itself. I had to turn the ends of a 2" solid square about 2' long down to 1 1/2" several years ago. I didn't have this set up at the time. I used a milling attachment and a lot of patience getting it centered then used a hole saw to remove the bulk of the OD. A reversed boring bar with the lathe also running reverse cleaned up the OD.

                TS
                I just thought of this and it seems like it should work too. If you don't have a boring head [or yours is threaded], but you do have a four jaw chuck and some boring bars, this may be a viable option for outside turning. [it would probably work for inside turning too]





                It's a simple bar or block with an offset hole that is slotted, cross drilled and tapped for a clamping screw. This mounts in your four jaw and is adjusted by loosening one jaw slightly and tightening the opposite jaw. A dial indicator will help to adjust in precise increments. Measurements are whatever your needs may be. But since the boring bar will act as a lever, thicker is better.

                Note: my brain says that as long as all the jaws are tight and the block is at least one inch thick, it should hold pretty solid. But my brain has been wrong before. Your mileage may vary.

                Comment


                • working through the dovetails for the QCTP blocks I got tired of
                  the 'hard' feel of shaper head so decided to break it down and check
                  it out. buggered up gib, decided to try my hand at scraping it in (its small)
                  and decided to make some "nice" scrapers.

                  the larger of the two is 10mm, the other is 6mm.
                  I essentially copied the larger one from the french scraping guy on
                  youtube.





                  (ps the shaper head feels great now but I can feel alot more of the backlash in the nut )

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Tony
                    working through the dovetails for the QCTP blocks I got tired of
                    the 'hard' feel of shaper head so decided to break it down and check
                    it out. buggered up gib, decided to try my hand at scraping it in (its small)
                    and decided to make some "nice" scrapers.
                    They're very pretty! Regarding your back lash.. You're a victim of Newton's 3rd law.. "Every action has an equal and opposite reaction".

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by noah katz
                      Also, I think the method would be improved by leaving the indicator in contact while turning the chuck by hand.
                      Now that I think about it, that means you don't need to bother with a ball bearing; just put a piece of brass or UHMW plastic in the toolholder.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by noah katz
                        Now that I think about it, that means you don't need to bother with a ball bearing; just put a piece of brass or UHMW plastic in the toolholder.
                        Now that you mention it, how about bandsaw 'Cool Blocks'?

                        Comment


                        • Not anywhere as elegant as most on here, but I could not have done this without your help. So, here is my version of the tangential tool holder. It does work well for deep cuts




                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Theiskell
                            Not anywhere as elegant as most on here, but I could not have done this without your help. So, here is my version of the tangential tool holder. It does work well for deep cuts




                            that sure is a pretty thing ! but like the octopus and the bagpipes ....... i have no clue as to what to do with it . lol please explain . thanks jack

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by jack3140
                              that sure is a pretty thing ! but like the octopus and the bagpipes ....... i have no clue as to what to do with it . lol please explain . thanks jack
                              Sorry, I guess I should tell what it is. It’s a tangential tool holder. It allows you to take much deeper cuts and seems to give better finishes. Also the tool grinding is simple. One 30 degree angle on the end of the hss tool. I am no expert on this but had seen several different discussions and versions of it on the web and thought I would give it a try.
                              Originally I was going to incorporate it into a tool holder. Well I did that, cut the dovetail and all, then found out that it was not going to be low enough to center on the stock. I know, I know, newb mistake. I was able to make it work just not how I originally envisioned.

                              Comment


                              • I ran across this the other day. I think it was my first government job after I became an apprentice. I was telling one of the journeymen that I had a metric plug that I needed to get out of a VW transaxle. He told me that it sounded like a good project for me. He had me design it. Probably would do it different now, but it worked. He even had me heat treat it in the weld shop. I think it was water hardening drill rod.

                                Brian
                                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                                THINK HARDER

                                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X