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  • Hi

    Here is a tailstock adaptor that allows a chuck to be fitted to the MT3 holder in the tailstock.

    This was the first project I made on my lathe.





    I am currently making a live adapter so I can use it to hold work in a chuck at the tailstock end.

    Dazz

    Comment


    • That's your first project on a lathe??? Bowl me over!

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      • wow, the tread looks pretty substantial. what size is it and what size chuck does it take?

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        • Nice looking piece of work Dazz, thanks for posting this.

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          • I have been trying to figure out what you would use a live center with a 4 jaw chuck in the tailstock of a lathe and come up empty handed.

            Can someone clue me in.

            Thanks,
            Brian

            edit. Oh wait, maybe crankshaft journals?
            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

            THINK HARDER

            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

            Comment


            • Crankshaft, camshaft or eccentric shaft.

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              • Rotating Chuck in Tailstock

                Also it can sometimes help with chatter depending on the harmonics of the workpiece. For example - a long slender part like a rifle barrel will usually chatter less this way than when squeezed on by a live center. Putting pressure towards the headstock chuck makes it want to bow outward. The tailstock chuck holds it in a more neutral state.
                Kansas City area

                Comment


                • Hi

                  It is a 1.5inch 8TPI Boxford/Southbend thread.

                  No, it isn't my first lathe project. That was a steam engine I made at school about 35 years ago. There was a big gap between that and the project above. I only got my own lathe 6 years ago. I knew the theory but the practice was a challenge. This was my first turned thread and first MT3 taper.

                  A live tailstock can be used to hold any attachment that will fit on the headstock including a chuck. It can hold odd shaped work or work without a centre (eg large bore item). It is one of those rarely used but really useful tools. The challenge is the extreme accuracy required on the shaft and bore for the taper roller bearings. That is also a first for me.

                  Dazz

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                  • Bought my wife a little Swiss Army watch a number of years ago. Runs on batteries and the local jeweler quoted a $60 price to replace the battery

                    Made this little guy out of brass to get the case back off... There's a little allen head bolt pressed into the other side (sorry no photo) in case I'd need some extra leverage (I didn't). $4 instead of the $60 sounds a lot more like it!



                    I know there have been a million of these, but while I was at it I made a little knob for my Horror Freight shop press:

                    Last edited by Magee; 07-02-2012, 12:18 PM.

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                    • I need to make one of those for my 20 ton bearing press! Thanks for the idea, if I can only remember it next time I am working in the shop!
                      Maybe a "Things to do" list for the shop is needed.

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                      • I have some more interesting stuff in progress, but in the meantime here's a little something. When it comes to small stuff, I usually end up making my own spade drills, countersinks/counterbores, etc when I need a specific size or shape that I don't already have. It's pretty easy to do, and over time I end up with a decent selection I can go back to when necessary.

                        This is the last counterbore cutter I made, to form a flat bottom recess for a screwhead in a small brass part. I don't remember the diameters of the pilot or the cutter offhand, but you get a general idea from the razor blade in the background of the pic. The pilot is a separate piece, made from O1 hardened and tempered to purple. It's pressed into the cutter body, also O1, hardened and tempered to light straw. It has two very shallow teeth - it needs to be withdrawn and the chips cleared every 0.010" or so.

                        Here is the cutter, next to the part after cutting the recess:

                        Max
                        http://joyofprecision.com/

                        Comment


                        • There is some lovely work in this wonderful thread I thought I might add a simple but very effective tool I have made.

                          It's a Shaper Slitting saw based on an idea from Ian Bradley's book The Shaping Machine.










                          Cheers

                          Paul

                          Comment


                          • That sure looks to be a handy tool (and well made).

                            Is that just a section of hacksaw being used as a cutter/saw blade?

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                            • Aloris Style Toolholders

                              I made some Aloris Style Toolholders.

                              The unfinished one became a flip up threading tool (props to Mike Cox, John Stevenson & Bogstandard et al).

                              Most facets were cut using a 1970 Elliott 10M shaper.









                              Cheers

                              Paul

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by + or - Zero
                                That sure looks to be a handy tool (and well made).

                                Is that just a section of hacksaw being used as a cutter/saw blade?
                                Thanks for the compliment and yes it uses standard hacksaw blades, I normally use the unworn ends of old blades unless I snap a new one then I use that.

                                It was quite a bit shinier but the casehardening stuff I use tends to leave a bit of a dull finish/pattern.

                                Cheers

                                Paul

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