Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shop Made Tools

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Another way to do it is to take a piece of flat stock that will fit the through the ID of the race you want to pull and about 1/8 to 3/16 thick. Cut the stock a little longer than the bearing race inner diameter, and grind the ends on an arc that is the same as the ID of the race you want to pull. Repeat for the opposite end of the flat stock and make a trial fit. If it is too long to lay squarely in the race, grind the arc on one end a bit until it just slides into place.

    Find the center and drill and tap it for a 3/8 or equivalent fine thread. Thread a piece of allthread through the tapped hole, back it with a nut to jam it in place. Repeat with a bridge over the top of the bearing and another nut and washer. Tighten the nut until the race pulls free. If it is stubborn, warm with a heat gun or blow dryer.

    I've pulled Timken tapered roller bearing cups the same way, using thicker stock. Works every time.
    Last edited by flutedchamber; 08-31-2012, 09:24 AM.

    Comment


    • Here is my first attempt at making my own tooling. I think it came out ok. I've been in need of a HD boring bar for a while now. I've been using one that is much too small for the job's I've been doing.

      Nothing like what some of you guys are turning out but gota start somewhere. I just thought why bother buying one when it looks easy to make.

      Made out of 3/4" stock, 8" long, and takes 1/4" HSS bits. I'm also going to mill a slot at the other end at 90deg. I did the milling on my 9" Hercus.

      Last edited by parrisw; 09-04-2012, 07:32 PM.

      Comment


      • It's been a while since I've had some 'free time' to work on shop projects.
        But today I was idle so I made a set of work stops, for small diameter stock, for my lathe.
        These are pretty self-explanatory.
        I have a 6" chuck, with a 1-1/2 thru hole, so I made stop sizes 1-3/8" down to 1/2"
        I turned the stop diameters .020 -.025 below nominal so the chuck would grip on he material, and not the stop.
        Sizes are: 1.350 (1-3/8), 1.230 (1-1/4"), 1.100 (1-1/8), .980 (1"), .850 (7/8), .730 (3/4"), .480 (1/2")
        I placed the #10-24 cap screws about 3/4 of the way down the length of the stop, (not on center).
        This way one end of the stop extends right to near the edge of the jaws, and the flip-side will recess the stop down to near the bottom of the jaws.
        I drilled and tapped, then used Loctite.
        ABRACADABRA! Stops!!
        I hope the picture explain it better than I did.
        .
        Last edited by KiddZimaHater; 09-04-2012, 09:24 PM.

        Comment


        • Man what an ordeal, photobucket is still down, so I signed up to flickr, and took a while to figure out how to host from there to here, so here is the boring bar I made.


          IMG_0584 by parrisw, on Flickr

          Comment


          • Also working on a better milling vise for my lathe, so had to machine a block for it to sit on and be clamped to, I'll machine off the fixed jaws on my milling attachment and bolt this block to it then the vise gets clamped to it with 4 blocks, not finished yet, but machined this clamp blocks yesterday, this will also allow me to bolt a rotary table to it as well.


            IMG_0589 by parrisw, on Flickr


            IMG_0590 by parrisw, on Flickr
            Last edited by parrisw; 09-05-2012, 11:13 PM.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by flutedchamber
              You are truly an artist in metal, and deserve more than just a blue ribbon. Perfect in every way.
              Because of the blue ribbon reference I think this was for me. If so, thanks for the kind words.

              I sure do wish I could get here more often!
              Best wishes to ya’ll.

              Sincerely,

              Jim

              "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

              "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

              Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

              Comment


              • RR track anvil.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Boostinjdm View Post
                  RR track anvil.
                  Now that is impressive. I don't know how many members are real familiar with rail (possibly quite a few), but that took either one whole lot of grinding or you have the grinder from... well a really killer grinder, and either way that took enormous dedication to the task.

                  I use chunks of rail for anvils, but just as hacked off the rail. I'd never even thought about trying to do what you have. Just WOW!

                  Comment


                  • It was an all day project. I went out to the garage between 9 and 10 am. Quit after painting at about 10 pm. There were many pee breaks and lunch in between. The flat parts were milled. The round parts roughed out with a torch, ground to shape with an angle grinder using a stone and flapwheel. Shiny parts were finished up by hand sanding with 300 grit wet/dry paper. I thought a mirror finish would be a bit much and quit there.

                    Comment


                    • Did you heat treat the R/R track anvil? I made one similar but it was too soft when I finished.

                      BE

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Boostinjdm View Post
                        It was an all day project. I went out to the garage between 9 and 10 am. Quit after painting at about 10 pm. There were many pee breaks and lunch in between. The flat parts were milled. The round parts roughed out with a torch, ground to shape with an angle grinder using a stone and flapwheel. Shiny parts were finished up by hand sanding with 300 grit wet/dry paper. I thought a mirror finish would be a bit much and quit there.
                        I'd sure like to know what mill you used and what cutter, I admit it never occurred to me to try milling a chunk of rail --but that's because it's awfully hard stuff (well, tough, that may be different then hard as in Rockwell). How did it machine?

                        Comment


                        • Here is my milling attachment all finished up.


                          IMG_0592 by parrisw, on Flickr


                          IMG_0591 by parrisw, on Flickr

                          Quick test, chucked up some round stock and milled a quick flat.


                          IMG_0593 by parrisw, on Flickr

                          Comment


                          • I've picked up a few tools like that at auctions.

                            It makes you wonder about the people who made them. Sadly most of these things come from estate sales or auctions which means never actually knowing the builder.

                            Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
                            -Yeah, it's fairly common. I have a few handmade pieces I've aquired over the years, including a 1/2,1,1-1/2" block, a 30-60-90 triangle, a couple of V-blocks and a sine bar, all of which had a shallow "slot" milled in one face or another, which was then stamped with the maker's name or initials.

                            It's kind of a pity I don't know any of them- the various makers- but I can say they made good stuff.

                            Doc.

                            Comment


                            • Each of us everytime we build something, no matter how trivial we might think it is, should always take a few minutes and stamp our name and date in the object, someday, someone will own that item and know at least who made it.

                              Comment


                              • Some very talented people here!
                                Doing a search for homemade tools brought me to this thread/forum and also what caused me to join.

                                While not even close to the complexity or beauty as most shown here....this is a simple tool I made to make releasing the valve on the engine hoist MUCH easier. I've always hated the slot at the end of the pole as it usually requires both hands and doesn't provide the proper leverage to make dialing in the pricise amount of adjustment sometimes needed. Can't tell you how many times I've seen someone attempt to lower something only to result in lowering too fast or jerky movements...me included. This fixes those problems. Now I can adjust single handed and use the other to help guide. I'll be making one of these for my Father pronto...I know he'll appreciate it's usefulness.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X