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  • Originally posted by sasquatch View Post
    Nice project, what make of bandsaw?
    Wilton 7015 and I love it.



    I do need to make a threaded rod with a tommy bar on top now that I know what one is...

    John
    My Web Site

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    • I looking to build one and I can understand most of how this will work but... Looking at the bar (pic left). Is that left on, when not in use, tight loose, removed... I know it is needed when using the taper...
      But what happens once the slide is bolted back to the the cross screw?

      Originally posted by Randy View Post

      I built this for my Jet 1024. I rarely use it, but it was a good project, and it looks nice. (The spot next to the adjustment knob is an epoxy patch resulting from a mid-build design change.)

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      • When the taper attachment is not in use, the clamp bolts on that anchor are simply left loose, so that it can slide freely on the V-way.

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        • Well I made my first tool starting with only stock steel. I looked at many plans and like this one the most. I have about 2.5 inches from center to base. That’s a easy 4 inch ball. Why? Well always WHY NOT. Hahaha My next tool is going to be a taper attachment for the lathe. All these are steps to a Quorn Tool & Cutter Grinder.


          My base

          The mount

          I know I saw this trip here on this site and I owe someone a thank you

          The finish with its first ball as a handle

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          • I don't think anyone has posted here with their shop made drill bits yet? It always amazes me how well they work when you're in a bind for a particular size. The other night I needed a couple of 6.8mm holes to tap for M8x1.25 threads - this was in some 1/4" mild steel plate. I can never quite manage to pry open the ol' wallet far enough to spring for a set of tap drills so I end up doing this sort of thing from time to time.

            The nice thing about these simple drills is that they aren't prone to wandering or grabbing into the work. I usually drill a pilot hole first so I don't have to fret over shaping the center point to cut.

            Here's my 6.8mm bit after I used it a couple of times:


            I just used O1 heat treated with a propane torch. It has about 1 degree of taper turned up to the shank - after turning that and the point taper, I just took a small file to it. After filing the flats but before filing the cutting relief angles, I like to cover the remainder of the tapered OD with blue sharpie so as I close in on a sharp edge I can make sure I'm not taking anything off the OD. Toward the end I switched to a needle file. Also note the bit is left-handed - between my files being right handed and myself being right handed, I find them a lot easier to shape this way. My drill press runs in reverse so no big deal.

            Anyone else here make their own bits from time to time? I'd be interested to learn more about that - I'm pretty much just going on pieces of info I've read here and there, on the Internet as well as old books.

            -Max
            mars-red
            Senior Member
            Last edited by mars-red; 11-21-2012, 01:47 PM.
            Max
            http://joyofprecision.com/

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            • Haven't made my own drill bits yet, but now I'm intrigued. Could you maybe do a bit more of a show and tell on how you make them? It sounds like a great technique to have available for those late night and weekend projects.

              J

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              • Originally posted by achtanelion View Post
                Haven't made my own drill bits yet, but now I'm intrigued. Could you maybe do a bit more of a show and tell on how you make them? It sounds like a great technique to have available for those late night and weekend projects.

                J
                Absolutely, I'd love to! I foresee some 3/8-24 threads in my near future, and I don't have a Q size drill bit... I'll do that sooner rather than later and take pictures along the way. These holes are going to need to be quite a bit deeper than usual so this will be the longest spade drill I've made to date. I'll do my best to sneak off to the workshop for a bit over my long Thanksgiving weekend.
                Max
                http://joyofprecision.com/

                Comment


                • Just some more stuff I have done I thought I would share.

                  I used to use a gunsmithing barrel vise to take apart my Albrecht Chucks. But I like this better so here are a couple of Albrecht Chuck vises I made for disassembling the unit so I can take them apart for cleaning or to remove the arbors. They can be clamped to a table or put in a large vise so you can use a strap wrench to unscrew the hood.


                  I have several water shutoff valves under the sinks and behind toilets that are extremely hard to turn. If you can get your hand on them you still can’t get a lot of leverage to close them off. So I made a 3/8 inch drive socket just for them. Note that the pressure from the tool stays at the top of the faucet handles dome, and not at the bottom of the skirt which could break.



                  I guess everybody has an oil dip can. I put magnets on the bottom of mine, so it is not likely to get spilled. The magnets also attract swarf and pull it off my brush. I also put a large magnet in a plastic container inside the can that also attracts swarf.


                  I put different color electrical tape on the knob of my power feed so I know at a glance about where to start.

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                  • For you woodworkers.

                    Most woodworkers know that a board should be first run flat through a jointer to start the squaring process. But sometimes the board is so hard to push forward; you end up pushing down so hard it takes the cup out of the board, and then springs back after you let up on it, which defeats the purpose.

                    This push block lets you reach back and hook it onto the end of the board so you don’t have to use so much downward pressure, which might take the twist or cup out of the board before it gets to the cutter. It keeps your hand safe too.

                    Oak strips are glued into a dado, and then backed with a flat support. No metal fasteners can be used attaching the wooden blocks.


                    Just a cross cut sled with an adjustable stop block.


                    A duel action wood workers bench vise. (poor mans version)
                    Almost 20 years now, back when I was dirt poor, I built my woodworkers work bench, and didn’t have any money for a bench vise, or a proper bench screw to operate the bench dogs. So I made this work with an acme threaded rod and an acme nut. The bench dog assembly and the bench vise work off the same screw. It works really well. I think I have $3-$4 in it.

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                    • Ron, some nice work. What did you use for the back edge guide/clamp rail and the miter slot guide?

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                      • Originally posted by chip's View Post
                        Ron, some nice work. What did you use for the back edge guide/clamp rail and the miter slot guide?
                        The back of the cross cut sled has a T-slot guide channel fit in a dado. I had it left over from a router station I built. I think I got it from Woodcraft Supply. These come in two widths, T-slot and Miter Channel widths. I used the T-slot size which is narrower.

                        The Stop was made from a couple of ¼-20 knobs, and two “T” nuts from the plumbing dept. of Lowes. The flip stop is just a piece of aluminum I fashioned from a piece of scrap.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by mars-red View Post
                          Absolutely, I'd love to! I foresee some 3/8-24 threads in my near future, and I don't have a Q size drill bit... I'll do that sooner rather than later and take pictures along the way. These holes are going to need to be quite a bit deeper than usual so this will be the longest spade drill I've made to date. I'll do my best to sneak off to the workshop for a bit over my long Thanksgiving weekend.
                          I ended up starting a separate thread for this:
                          http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...you-make-yours

                          I ended up working on a different project than I anticipated, so that post shows the making of a 3.3mm bit rather than the expected Q size bit.
                          Max
                          http://joyofprecision.com/

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by sasquatch
                            (Yup,, been "Dirt Poor" also,, and it can really get the old brain working to create a solution that you can make into a useable item.) - I think everyone needs to go through that stage first, as it does help to see solutions, and builds some creativity in ones self.
                            Agreed. Its amazing what you can come up with when the thing you want/need is not easily accessible.

                            I needed a fly cutter, no place within 2 hours of the house had one, and I hate paying shipping for a single item, yet couldn't justify spending a bunch to have a big enough order to make it worthwhile. So I built one.

                            The body came from an old nasty chunk of aluminum that I turned down on the mill, and the shaft is a burnt up endmill with the pointy ends ground off.



                            After doing a bunch of research on how to sharpen it properly (and not like the photo above ), it just keeps getting better.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Duuuuuuuude View Post
                              Agreed. Its amazing what you can come up with when the thing you want/need is not easily accessible.

                              I needed a fly cutter, no place within 2 hours of the house had one, and I hate paying shipping for a single item, yet couldn't justify spending a bunch to have a big enough order to make it worthwhile. So I built one.

                              The body came from an old nasty chunk of aluminum that I turned down on the mill, and the shaft is a burnt up endmill with the pointy ends ground off.



                              After doing a bunch of research on how to sharpen it properly (and not like the photo above ), it just keeps getting better.

                              A couple points of note:

                              Generally, when making a fly cutter...it's better to have the slot cut such that the cutting edge of the tool will be on center with the spindle. This is not to say that the way you did it will not work, but sharpening will be tough, because you've now got to grind the tip such that it is effectively on center...at least for best results.

                              2: When using HSS blanks for your cutter, use a little dremmel stone to grind detents in the tool for the set screws to bite into. The vibrations present in flycutting will sometimes loosen up the screws just a touch, and the HSS will come out of the body like a bullet. Brazed tools don't have this problem because the substrate is generally softer and the screws can bit into the tool a bit more. Also, check the screws for tightness on a regular basis...between passes even. I still haven't found the piece of HSS that flew out of my flycutter a while back....I'm just glad it missed me.

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                              • I would also add that aluminium is not the best material for a flycutter because it is so light and this gives it very little flywheel effect. The inertia of a heavy holder means smoother cutting and less strain on the mill bearings during the intermittent cuts that are the norm when flycutting.
                                Mike

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