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  • rcaffin
    replied
    Pics: we NEED them!
    Cheers
    Roger

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  • J-Rob
    replied
    I received a set of R8 collets for Christmas. Included in the set is a 1" size collet. Now as we all know, 7/8" is about as large as most R8 collets come due to the diameter, so in order to make a 1" collet the manufacturer of this imported wonder creation had to extend the length of the collet and I crease the diameter of the collet beyond what the R8 taper at Max diameter is. Its a dangerous looking tool. The depth of the finished bore that holds 1" dia tooling is about 1.125" deep. There is no way I would put a 1" endmill in this thing and start hogging! The entire endmill will be outside of the spindle! There are only 3 "petals" or "jaws" holding the endmill! Anyways, I've had this so called collet for a while and I've not known what to do with it... Until now!

    The other day I was contemplating different ways to implement a grinder to take advantage of my X and Y axis's. I have a 4 jaw independent Chuck that I mount to a 4" rotary table. The jaws gripping surface (when jaws are mounted in the traditional direction) is not perpendicular to jaw travel nor parallel to the rotation axis of Chuck/table. In other words, when I tried to grip an endmill to sharpen the end edges, it wobbled. The end mill was gripped tightly at the end inserted furthest into the chuck, but was loose at the "top" of the jaws. Further measuremental investigative practices revealed the jaw gripping surface needs to be reground to correct the issue.


    I was looking at all of my die grinders and try to determine if any of them would be suitable to adapt to my existing machine and accurately grind the jaws while mounted in the chuck. I have a bunch of the cheap, 90 degree angle, high speed die from fees from HF and Tractor Supply. While holding one and looking at the head of it it looked like it was around an inch in diameter. Measuring revealed a direct correlation between the head and 1.053 on my Pittsburgh digital caliper. So I took the grinder, gripped on the outer portion of the collet with my wonky 4 jaw chuck that's mounted to the rotary table, chucked up a 2" grinding wheel and proceeded to grind off some of the head material while rotating the grinder through about 270 degrees of rotation around the grinders own spindle bearings. Got it shaved down close enough.

    Next thing I did was remove one of the "petals" or " jaws" of the previously discussed engineering fiasco that is a 1" R8 collet. I left about 0.125" on the petal I cut off above the 1" bore floor. There is a little bit of the grinders head that goes down to the floor in that region.

    Next step for me to do is post pictures of all this. I took some, but will take more. Then I can finally test it out. The goal was to find an easy way to mount something that I can mount a little grinding stone or whatever to. If this works I'll have a 90 degree die grinder that has the handle out to the side while the "head" of the grinder is inline with spindle on my milling machine. I can then theoretically do semi-precision, amateur, learn as I go grinding (possibly ruining some things). I'll get pics of this contraption up soon (I hope).



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  • bborr01
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    This thread is the reason I joined this site, and then later discovered the magazine and village press. It has the most views of any forum I have seen in 25 years on the Internet. I do believe it should be edited into its own book.
    Village press did print a couple of magazine style publications based on the shop made tools thread. I'm not sure if they are still in stock but they were a few years ago. Maybe check with George on that.

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  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    I believe it was also what lead me to join. I know I had this thread bookmarked before I posted anything, and then I decided it would be a good community to share (eh lets call it what is is: show off) my royersford. So yeah, I would say bborr brought me along too, for that I must thank him.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by bborr01 View Post

    Thanks for the kind words Rob. I started this thread to keep from getting bored on a winter trip to Arizona. The night before we left I went out to my toolbox and started taking pictures and 12,500,000 views later it is still getting attention. I sure do wish photosuckit hadn't messed up all the pictures though.

    Brian
    This thread is the reason I joined this site, and then later discovered the magazine and village press. It has the most views of any forum I have seen in 25 years on the Internet. I do believe it should be edited into its own book.

    Leave a comment:


  • bborr01
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Rob View Post
    Just happened to notice this threads ten-year anniversary is in a few days. It has been a great read. Thanks for that. Happy birthday, Thread.
    Thanks for the kind words Rob. I started this thread to keep from getting bored on a winter trip to Arizona. The night before we left I went out to my toolbox and started taking pictures and 12,500,000 views later it is still getting attention. I sure do wish photosuckit hadn't messed up all the pictures though.

    Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • MrWhoopee
    replied
    Yea, the 2 in. tall jaws are probably overkill, I was thinking like an AngLock. When mounted on the angle plate, the part will be clamped dead against the plate to maintain verticality (?). Same on the table, or on minimum height parallels to get clearance for drilling or milling through. 1.25 high jaws should be more than adequate. To minimize flexing, make the jaws wider than tall. I couldn't do that due to space limitations on the angle plate. I tested it today by flycutting the end of a piece of 5/8 x 3 aluminum. Came out as square as my eyes can detect with my "inspection" square.

    One major difference with a table vise is the moving jaw is infinitely adjustable, so the screw can be quite short.

    Last edited by MrWhoopee; 01-17-2020, 05:23 PM.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    I'm considering something of the same sort to use as a two part vise for my mill table to hold larger items than what will fit in my regular mill vise.

    But one possible aspect that arose from looking into these is that if the jaws are at all tall that a bending load will be put into the base (mill table in my case and the bigger flat of your angle plate in yours) that will result in it springing to an arched shape that is proportional to the force used to clamp the item and the height of the jaws. Now we need to hold the items firmly. So clamping is a must. But at least I can limit the jaw height to minimize the bending force that is trying to arch the table (or base of the plate). With that in mind I'm wondering if you would be able to do most of the jobs you want to do with more like a 1 or 1.25" tall jaw set and with the pusher screws that much closer to the plate. And 1.25" is what I'm considering for the height of the jaws on my two piece table vise as a result as well.

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  • Dr. Rob
    replied
    Just happened to notice this threads ten-year anniversary is in a few days. It has been a great read. Thanks for that. Happy birthday, Thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    That's pretty creative. Well done on getting the most of out a tool.

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  • MrWhoopee
    replied
    (continued from previous post)

    Using some 1" thick O-6 tool steel I had laying around, I made a heavy side plate.

    Click image for larger version

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    While making this piece, I decided what I was picturing could be used in another manner. (Hint: note the large counterbores in the edge.)

    I then made a moving jaw and mount from the same O-6.

    Click image for larger version

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    And so was born the Perverti-Vise (not to be confused with the original Verti-vise).

    Click image for larger version

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    The jaws are 2" "tall", with a maximum opening of 5 in.

    And, as I suggested earlier, it can be used in a different mode, without the angle plate.

    Click image for larger version

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    A table vise with capacity limited only by the table.

    Currently working on some refinements, but I'm pretty happy with it.​

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  • MrWhoopee
    replied
    It all started when I found this rather large angle plate in the miscellaneous stuff that Fred gave me along with the mill and lathe.

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    It is 7.25" tall x 7" wide with 4" foot. The vertical is 1" thick and the foot is 1.25". It was apparently from a special purpose piece of tooling, but has long since lost it's purpose. It is ground all over except the edges which are milled, and is as square as I am capable of measuring.

    I decided to modify it for use on the mill, it already had holes in the foot for bolting to the table. Weighing in at about 20 lbs, it needed a handle.

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    While making the handle, I found that you can mill steel with carbide router bits.

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    Then the plate needed some 1/2-13 tapped holes for clamp studs

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    and maybe some 1/4-20 tapped holes on the edges to attach a parallel as a side alignment plate.

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    It was at this point that I realized this thing could be so much more.......

    (to be continued)
    Last edited by MrWhoopee; 01-16-2020, 01:50 AM.

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  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    awesome! I'll be world famous
    I wouldn't go that far

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  • Jerrythepilot
    replied
    Thanks Mattthemuppet, I wish I knew what a lot of you guys forgot, but I’m getting there!
    Jerry

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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    awesome! I'll be world famous

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