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  • Hal
    replied
    Thanks for the reply. I hope you get a lot of shooting in this year.
    I have a barrel on order from Lilja for a ..17 R.E.M. For my son. I need to order a .25 barrel to build a .257 weatherby for my hunting rifle.

    Hal

    Leave a comment:


  • ken226
    replied
    Originally posted by Hal View Post
    Ken

    Very fine work. You put a lot of thought into design.
    I'll have to try making a chuck for my d1-3.
    What steel did you use ?
    what type of shooting do you do?
    Any better pictures of of your logo and how did you engrave your logo?
    Hal

    I apologize. Last time I looked at this thread, I didn't see your questions.


    ​​​​​​I used 8620 hot roll steel. For no other reason than I got a deal on it.

    I do mostly intermediate range steel shooting. Stuff like PRS.

    The logo was CNC milled on a 7x26 3 axis vertical mill, using a 1/32" ball end mill.



    ​​​​​
    Last edited by ken226; 03-14-2021, 10:20 PM.

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  • ken226
    replied
    Thanks for the kind words guys. I've had the tooling bug lately. Been buying and making all the stuff I've had a need for over my last 15 years of metal working.

    I even made a knife sharpener a few months ago, inspired by the Wicked Edge pro.







    ​​​​​​​

    Leave a comment:


  • Hal
    replied
    Ken

    Very fine work. You put a lot of thought into design.
    I'll have to try making a chuck for my d1-3.
    What steel did you use ?
    what type of shooting do you do?
    Any better pictures of of your logo and how did you engrave your logo?
    Hal
    Last edited by Hal; 03-12-2021, 09:27 PM.

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  • ezduzit
    replied
    Really nice work, Ken.

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  • ken226
    replied
    I made these recently.

    I direct mount d1-4 spider and outboard spider set for chambering rifle barrels:



    A d1-4 direct mount receiver truing chuck:





    And a axial/radial floating collet chuck. It floats radially .03" from center in all directions, and axially has a 5° range of freedom. When the outer collar is tightened, it draws the moving parts to center and locks everything, for rigid drilling.






    Leave a comment:


  • rcaffin
    replied
    Gang tooling: this is a 4-hole unit with 3 tools in it: outside turning, inside turning, and drilling.
    Gang Tooling

    For smaller drill bits the empty hole can take a centre drill bit.
    This was made from simple Al bar stock, with the block on the CNC table or saddle and the boring done from the chuck - so naturally everything lines up very well. The visible drill bit is in a custom sleeve of course; a chuck would stick out too far.

    Cheers
    Roger

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by metalfixer View Post

    That's a great idea, and combine it with a 4 position stop.
    Larry Click image for larger version

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    Yes, that would be a great teaming.

    I know that there are MT tailstock adapters that hold tooling but with this block in the toolpost option along with a bed stop the options for OD steps and other features open up a lot of small numbers or repetitive hobby options.

    Would it be too much to suggest one of those multi tool tail stock units AND the tool post block AND the bed stop? I think not!

    Leave a comment:


  • metalfixer
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    Those ganged tool holders could be handy even on a manual lathe for some repetitive jobs. The end face and then each hole could be made to some equal spacing which would make it easy to dial in the block then advance the cross slide to each position.
    That's a great idea, and combine it with a 4 position stop.
    Larry Click image for larger version

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Those ganged tool holders could be handy even on a manual lathe for some repetitive jobs. The end face and then each hole could be made to some equal spacing which would make it easy to dial in the block then advance the cross slide to each position.

    Leave a comment:


  • luthor
    replied
    Originally posted by Bented View Post
    Unfinished gang tool holder for an old CNC lathe, one more hole to be drilled and reamed then the set screw holes drilled and tapped.
    Left handed boring bar for light facing and OD turning, drill, bore then an internal retaining ring groove tool (not shown). Give each tool a number and then touch them off, write the program and have at it, do not call the wrong tool number at the wrong time as this makes for spectacular crashes (-:

    The parts were POM so it did not have to be very rigid.

    I made something similar for my Australian made CNC Lathe, they are very handy and save a lot of tool changes.

    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by luthor; 03-08-2021, 06:19 AM.

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  • Dave C
    replied
    Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
    Carbide PCB drills: many of them start at 0.035 mm (#80), but a market watch will find smaller ones. I keep an eye on this.

    Carbide boring bar: I take it that the bit in the lathe chuck has the offset? I use a TCG instead, but this idea is a good one.
    And I note the rag used to keep the carbide dust off the lathe ways: very wise. The dust goes everywhere!

    Cheers
    Roger
    Bother: yes, 0.35 mm, not 0.035 mm. Just checking to see who was watching of course ...
    Reminds me of a tale from a long time ago about the German and Swiss trying to outdo each other. The Germans drew a wire of something like the diameter of a human hair, then turned one end and threaded it. They sent it to the Swiss, saying we've beaten you. You cannot possibly improve on this. The Swiss promptly sent it back and the Germans thinking they had finally beat them asked why they gave up the fight. The Swiss responded with: You Germans didn't inspect the part very well. We cut it in two, turned and threaded one piece, bored the other piece, cut internal threads in it, and screwed both pieces back together." So let's see you improve on this one."
    Last edited by Dave C; 03-06-2021, 04:44 PM.

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
    Carbide PCB drills: many of them start at 0.035 mm (#80), but a market watch will find smaller ones. I keep an eye on this.

    Carbide boring bar: I take it that the bit in the lathe chuck has the offset? I use a TCG instead, but this idea is a good one.
    And I note the rag used to keep the carbide dust off the lathe ways: very wise. The dust goes everywhere!

    Cheers
    Roger
    0.35mm, not 0.035mm

    Carbide boring bar: yup, I offset the collet chuck with a piece of shim between one of the jaws or something like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • rcaffin
    replied
    Carbide PCB drills: many of them start at 0.035 mm (#80), but a market watch will find smaller ones. I keep an eye on this.

    Carbide boring bar: I take it that the bit in the lathe chuck has the offset? I use a TCG instead, but this idea is a good one.
    And I note the rag used to keep the carbide dust off the lathe ways: very wise. The dust goes everywhere!

    Cheers
    Roger
    Bother: yes, 0.35 mm, not 0.035 mm. Just checking to see who was watching of course ...
    Last edited by rcaffin; 03-06-2021, 03:45 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    I have probably posted this before but:
    Solid carbide boring bar from 1/8" drill shank. Diamond burr and cheapo die grinder.

    Leave a comment:

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