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Tire burning stove for workshop?

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  • Tire burning stove for workshop?

    Anyone know of a design? WE have over 700 tires at the new shop... A disaster. Owner has a lawsuit against the guy who left them.

    I know they burn hot.. too hot for a barrel stove..

    David.

  • #2
    Well the trick is getting rid of the black smoke,a propane afterburner is in order.

    You also need a grate cleaner so you can remove the steel belts quickly.

    My boss had a design he was working on for an aluminum foundry in Mexico,don't think they would let them burn tires either though.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

    Comment


    • #3
      I once knew a polygamist in Ephraim Utah that had a working design. If you'd like I could find out how far he got with it. He was a pretty interesting and capable guy (you'd have to be!) He and his best friend built homebuilt aircraft. His friend augered in when something snapped. Thats how he ended up with wife #2.

      Spence

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      • #4
        When I was a kid, my grandad had an excavating company. Had a big corrugated steel building where the machinery repair was done, lotsa cracks and no insulation. In the winter they set up a 1500 gal. tank on end added a chimney of corrugated culvert and cut a door in the side. Into this they would throw a truck tire, rim and all, along with tar-block wooden flooring removed from a local GM plant, and light it up. Pitch-black smoke from the chimney, but there was nobody down wind that complained. Eventually, the tank/stove would glow dull red, and working would be comfortable anywhere within about fifteen feet. One day I (10 years old) was there watching the goings-on but I got cold so I stood with my back to the stove until my dad noticed that smoke was rising from my back. The back of my new Mackinaw jacket was charred. I didn't get beat, but chewed out pretty good.

        Wes

        Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
        ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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        • #5
          Burning tires have a great heat source. One of the problems is possibly too much heat and black smelly emissions. If you procede with this project, here are a few suggestions. Use a large thick walled tank, like a 500 gallon anhydrous tank. If possible, put a flighting on the inside of the tank. The tank is sitting on its end. Also put a ventilated grate in the bottom. And to keep the fire burning hot enough to burn the black emissions the vent must have a forced air fan. I hope this helps. A thirteen inch tire puts off an incredible amount of heat, so be prepared to open the windows. Another thing to consider when building this is to design it so it can burn pulled fence posts and railroad ties. One more consideration is cutting steel belted tires. Cappy Pinkerton

          ------------------

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          • #6
            No one cares about the pollution from burning tires?

            Comment


            • #7
              kenc
              Member posted 10-18-2003 11:58 AM
              --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              No one cares about the pollution from burning tires?

              I am surprised by this statement.Certainly I would guess you are wrong with regards to this. Burning tyres or tires these days is very much a matter for concern as the pollutants given off are very dangerous you may find you are in for a big shock.Better check with the local authority as here anyone caught using tires for fuel in this way would be very heaviuly fined.Could be prohibitively expensive.Alistair
              Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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              • #8
                Not to mention that the burning creosote releases cresols which are carcinogenic.
                Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                • #9
                  yes that too be careful Ibew the environmental health people treat this much more seriously than a few years ago even.Alistair
                  Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                  • #10
                    Ah. To hell with the pollution! I'm getting tired of snow in December anyway.Pump some freon through that puppy while your at it.

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                    • #11
                      I wonder the differences in burning tires and coal.

                      Some heavy coal smokes quite as much as the tires would. Sulphur? acid rain? they use it close to here for power generation. Grind it up, spray it against a plate and burn it. At least that is the clean system at the WIdows Creek steam generation plant.

                      I wonder... I remember seeing a movie where (blackhawk down) the natives used the tires as a signal fire..

                      possibly they are not being burned at high enough of a temperature?

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                      • #12
                        Local cement manufacturer (Lehigh?) burned tires in their kiln for a while, not clear if they are still doing so. Cement kilns are one of the few operations that run at a temp high enough to completely combust the tires. IIRC the use of tires as fuel was developmental , some kilns just tossed the whole tire in and others shredded in advance. The wire component was said to enhance the cement product. Steve

                        [This message has been edited by sch (edited 10-18-2003).]
                        Steve

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                        • #13
                          A paper company over in Ticonderoga NY has been trying to get permission for a test burn of old tires in the paper mill. The people on this side of the lake (Vermont) aren't too happy at the prospect of tire smoke floating their way. I think there must be better ways of using old tires. Don't know how much smoke scrubbing they planned to do. Maybe in an industrial setting they can be burned cleanly.

                          [This message has been edited by Sprocket (edited 10-19-2003).]

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                          • #14
                            They have shredded tires and added them with asphalt in paving roads. I don't know how much of that is being done or where.

                            I can imagine that there may be a way to add an afterburner on a furnace to clean up the emissions. Maybe introduce some air or oxygen and a little propane or natural gas. Something similar to a gas fired forge? The cost of it might make it impractical and then there may still be emissions that although not visible would still be objectionable to the regulatory agencies.

                            Bernard

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                            • #15
                              I was part of the tire burning installation at a cement plant (Essroc, in PA). The tires where dropped into the rotary oven and vaporized instantly in the 2000*F heat.The EPA installed all kinds of monitors on the smoke stack. Must be a tax write off, because after the EPA got done adding 'sniffers', you could not burn enough scrap tires to pay for the installation. Great source of energy remains unused.When I get cold, quess one option will be to "Hug a tree".

                              [This message has been edited by lone waddie (edited 10-19-2003).]

                              [This message has been edited by lone waddie (edited 10-19-2003).]

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