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  • need self priming pump ideas

    any ideas on commonly available (read cheap) low volume, self priming pumps? a project of mine, still virtual, is a central coolant system and I'd like a centralized return pump. I thought of making one, piston style, but life would be easier if i could just buy (cheap like). I've decided to go overhead with the plumbing, so the challenge is potentially 8' of head
    .

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mcgyver
    any ideas on commonly available (read cheap) low volume, self priming pumps? a project of mine, still virtual, is a central coolant system and I'd like a centralized return pump. I thought of making one, piston style, but life would be easier if i could just buy (cheap like). I've decided to go overhead with the plumbing, so the challenge is potentially 8' of head
    Probably less than that, as the descending pipe will restore some head, leaving the difference, plus frictional head. Unless you are going to put it in a sump area.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #3
      something like this? https://www.surpluscenter.com/item.a...&catname=water

      You should also be able to find a similar one at TSC, Rural King, or other farm supply store.

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      • #4
        Where do you want the pump to pump to and from? If it is a cental system with a return sump that will always have a liquid level, a self priming pump will not be a necessity.
        Jim H.

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        • #5
          those garden pond pumps might do the trick. come in several GPM sizes. I had a scrap one apart and was surprised to see that all the internals are made of ceramic, very wear resistant. the drive was thru a magnetic coupling so that the motor was completely sealed from the pumped fluid. Unfortunatly I don't remember the maker of that particular pump.

          Joe B

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          • #6
            the idea is there there's a well or sump somewhere off each table drain.... with the table in its lowest position, the well is close to floor level. I want a central pump to drain these wells. Lines will go from each well to the ceiling and across to the tank. The plan is to either manually or via solenoids open only the lines at the active machine. The lines will initially be full of air and go from close to the floor to the ceiling, hence the 8 foot head.
            .

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            • #7
              Something to consider. When I worked for CMI we had a central coolant system that was full of bacteria and caused many staph infections. If you have one machine get nasty it is fairly easy to deal with, a central system however is much more problematic.

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              • #8
                Stan, that's one of the objectives of single tank, put in the infrastructure to keep in clean....anyway, lots more Q's and points for the overall idea....for another thread, hopefully I can get the self priming pump thing solved in this one

                the one you posted and Joes, are submersibles, so won't be self priming
                Last edited by Mcgyver; 01-31-2010, 11:52 PM.
                .

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                • #9
                  The submersibles are self priming as long as there is enough liquid to cover the inlet.You could also have pump close coupled to the outlet of the tank.

                  Install a check valve on the vertical lin directly after the pump discharge, and the line will remain full.
                  Jim H.

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                  • #10
                    i can only see a submersible working if its sitting in the sump, which i want to avoid (one pump instead of 6). also i don't want coolant in the lines.....it needs to circulate through my bug killing stuff.

                    i'm no pump expert, but i thought self priming meant the pump can be dry and above the liquid...?

                    I can make one I think, but was hoping I'd missed some common home/farm/yard application that uses them so i could take advantage of consumer mass production pricing
                    .

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                    • #11
                      Sounds like a centrifugal sump pump would be the thing to use as a sump pump.



                      $59 at C-Tire.
                      Last edited by Evan; 02-01-2010, 01:10 AM.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Evan
                        Sounds like a centrifugal sump pump would be the thing to use as a sump pump.



                        $59 at C-Tire.

                        A submersible or sump pump wont work.

                        The pump isn't in the sump, its by the tank with lines going across the ceiling and down to a variety of sumps. only the lines to the active machines will be open, otherwise it would just suck air, but unless I'm missing something this precludes sump pumps or submersibles. The whole idea is there are going to be a lot of sumps and its 1) too costly to put a pump in each, and 2) a submersible or sump pump will stop pumping when the liquid is gone, leaving lots in the lines...I want the lines cleared so the coolant doesn't sit there and rot

                        no ideas on a self priming pump?
                        .

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                        • #13
                          roller pump they are self priming and can remove the last drop. Expensive to buy but easy to built

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                          • #14
                            Possibly a vacuum system of sorts acting on a closed tank could satisfy your needs.

                            A type of pump that develops good suction and can be run dry is the diaphragm pump. Wilden and a couple of other manufacturers make small air operated pumps that often turn up on eBay at low prices. Several are of all plastic construction for chemical resistance. There are also some motor driven diaphragm pumps and shop fabrication is not out of the question.

                            Another thing to explore is a peristaltic pump, they can be home built, develop a good suction and can be run dry. The pumping member is subject to wear, but replacement is simple and inexpensive.
                            Jim H.

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                            • #15
                              Second the roller, (peristaltic,) pump idea. They can run at any fairly low speed and the output is according to tubing size. But Mike, you will HAVE to build it, unless you steal it from a neighbor's dialysis unit! There were plans for one in a back issue of HSM. Tubing life is short, silicone-type preferred, but it is quick to change. The output that you need is probably only a couple of liters/min. Duffy
                              Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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