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  • Never saw this

    http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/MVC-725S.jpg
    http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/MVC-726S.jpg

    It has a half inch drive in and half inch square out for maybe a socket.
    Don't know what the wire clamp is for.
    What is it for and how do you use it?
    Last edited by Terry; 02-03-2010, 08:29 PM.

  • #2
    A static clamp?

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    • #3
      I think thats a torque rotation aid.
      I seem to recall some bolts (head bolts on an engine?) that required to be torqued to a point, and then rotated another half turn or whatever.

      the clamp would be used to make the guage stationary, and it looks like theres an indicator 'rod' sticking out of the center that rotates. as you tighten the bolt... letting you keep track of the rotation of the bolt even as you move your rachet back and forth.
      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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      • #4
        The only pieces on their site made in America?

        - Bill

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        • #5
          black moons has it right, it is an torque angle indicator. Lots of the automotive manufactures use plastic region bolts that are torqued to say 25 lbs and then an additional 90* and then an additional 90*.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by quadrod
            black moons has it right, it is an torque angle indicator. Lots of the automotive manufactures use plastic region bolts that are torqued to say 25 lbs and then an additional 90* and then an additional 90*.
            you r correct sir !!!

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            • #7
              Had never seen one of those, used a screwdriver to scratch a mark and fudged the 90؛.

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              • #8
                Harley specifies this type of torque procedure on it's current Twin Cam motors.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by quadrod
                  Lots of the automotive manufactures use plastic region bolts that are
                  torqued to say 25 lbs and then an additional 90* and then an additional 90*.
                  These are known as Torque-To-Yield fasteners.

                  There may be exceptions, but generally, TTY fasteners are intended for
                  one-time use. They are to be replaced with new bolts, not used again.

                  Further reading: The secrets of bolt tightening by Jim Kerr.

                  .

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by EddyCurr
                    These are known as Torque-To-Yield fasteners.

                    There may be exceptions, but generally, TTY fasteners are intended for
                    one-time use. They are to be replaced with new bolts, not used again.

                    Further reading: The secrets of bolt tightening by Jim Kerr.

                    .
                    Also called stretch bolts. use just once is correct.

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                    • #11
                      Now that doesn't instill a whole lot of confidence- torque the bolts til they start to give way
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #12
                        So, how are you supposed to know the difference between the stretch bolts and the regular kind once it's removed from where it was originally installed?

                        Is there a way to tell if they've already been stretched? Maybe paint on the shank that would show hairline cracks?
                        Last edited by winchman; 02-04-2010, 04:11 AM.
                        Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tdkkart
                          Harley specifies this type of torque procedure on it's current Twin Cam motors.

                          Yes. But they have used that method for a long time starting with the Evolution motors in 1984/85 on the cylinder head torque procedure. They get to a certain point and then give another set rotation in degrees.

                          More recently, on the Twin Cam engines as you say, they changed the procedure to tighten up the motor drive sprocket from a straight torque to something like 70 ft. lbs. followed by another set degree of rotation.

                          I'm guessing that the clamp on that tool would be used to hang it up somewhere so that it doesn't get lost.
                          Last edited by gnm109; 02-04-2010, 09:07 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by winchman
                            So, how are you supposed to know the difference between the stretch bolts and the regular kind once it's removed from where it was originally installed?

                            Is there a way to tell if they've already been stretched? Maybe paint on the shank that would show hairline cracks?
                            Don't know of any easily definable method.
                            They do seem to be smaller in diameter then conventional (automotive) head bolts but never deliberately compared them, however, it wouldn't surprise me if there was some form of marking stamped in them.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by winchman
                              So, how are you supposed to know the difference between the stretch bolts and the regular kind once it's removed from where it was originally installed?

                              Is there a way to tell if they've already been stretched? Maybe paint on the shank that would show hairline cracks?
                              When they've been stretched they'll usually be longer

                              The workshop manual will specify the bolt length limits.

                              But not mixing up the used and the new bolts when re-assembling an engine also helps of course...

                              Alex

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