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O.T. Is there a formula for changing ft.lb.into inch

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  • O.T. Is there a formula for changing ft.lb.into inch

    Looking for a way to change formula foot lbs. into inch lbs my motor cycle owner's manual has some parts that require 2.6 foot lbs my tork wrench doesen't go anywhere near that low. I have and inch lbs tork wrench. Or do they make something that actualy goes that low? A lot of the bolts and such range from 16 ft.lbs. down to 2.6.
    Thanks in advance Richard

  • #2
    One foot pound is 12 inch pounds. You just multiply by 12.

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    • #3
      Foot X 12= in.

      Multiply the foot lbs. by 12 this will give you inch pounds.
      2.6 foot lbs. = 31.2 inch lbs.
      Visit my site for machinist videos free charts & more

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      • #4
        I've found this calculator useful.
        Regards
        Geoff
        My place.

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        • #5
          Actually, this question is kinda dumb. Inch, foot, what is to calculate?

          Inch, foot, 84 inch pounds, divide by seven, you got 7 foot pounds.

          We got LOTS of pipple who never learned their onesies and twosies.

          My God, are my Grands gonna grow up that dumb?

          I actually know a decent mech who asked me how do you figure 84 inch pounds on a Chevy 3.8 intake manifold's screws.

          Younkers are flat out dumb. I wonder if that can be because or GW Bush and "No Child's Behind's Left"?

          Cheers,

          George

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          • #6
            "Actually, this question is kinda dumb."

            I disagree. It's a good question, but it's something that should have been answered for Richard before now and somewhere else. I've encountered lots of kids in the welding classes that cannot read a tape measure or ruler, which is something most of us take for granted.

            The South Carolina public schools I attended in the '50s and '60s may not have prepared me well for higher math and science, but I certainly learned how to read, write, do arithmetic, and most other things needed for getting along in life.
            Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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            • #7
              There's no such thing as a dumb question. If you can't ask it here - among friends - where can you ask it?

              RichardG: Do you have a Machinery's Handbook? Well worth the expense of picking up a copy, even if you get a used one.
              Sometimes the professional is hidebound by tradition while the skilled amateur, not knowing it can't be done blazes a new trail. -JCHannum

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gmatov
                Actually, this question is kinda dumb. Inch, foot, what is to calculate?

                Inch, foot, 84 inch pounds, divide by seven, you got 7 foot pounds.

                We got LOTS of pipple who never learned their onesies and twosies.

                My God, are my Grands gonna grow up that dumb?

                I actually know a decent mech who asked me how do you figure 84 inch pounds on a Chevy 3.8 intake manifold's screws.

                Younkers are flat out dumb. I wonder if that can be because or GW Bush and "No Child's Behind's Left"?

                Cheers,

                George
                Great attitude to have there bud! Especially since your math doesn't work out worth a sh!t. 84 divided by 7 comes out to 12.

                Granted if the OP had thought it through, the answer may have come to him, but then again, maybe not. Even simple math is not always immediately evident to all. I would rather ask an obvious question and make sure I get things right than not be 100% certain and screw something up. Just the other night I had to use an online calculator to convert oz/in to lb/ft just to double check my math.

                It appears that you should consider using a calculator to double check your math as well, the old cogs seem to be slipping Gramps.

                Later,
                Jason

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                • #9
                  And I wonder why some people don't ask questions or show their projects. I don't because I would rather keep them to myself instead of parading them around in front of a dick like you. Patience isn't a virtue keeping sh*t like that to yourself is.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jacampb2
                    Great attitude to have there bud! Especially since your math doesn't work out worth a sh!t. 84 divided by 7 comes out to 12.

                    Granted if the OP had thought it through, the answer may have come to him, but then again, maybe not. Even simple math is not always immediately evident to all. I would rather ask an obvious question and make sure I get things right than not be 100% certain and screw something up. Just the other night I had to use an online calculator to convert oz/in to lb/ft just to double check my math.

                    It appears that you should consider using a calculator to double check your math as well, the old cogs seem to be slipping Gramps.

                    Later,
                    Jason
                    Sooo...you were born an a$$hole and just got bigger I presume?

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                    • #11
                      An alternative is just to ask google "2.6 ft/lbs in in/lbs"

                      I know how to do the math but are far too lazy to learn how many inch per foot...

                      Edit: Google can calculate many other things as well
                      Last edited by CountZero; 02-04-2010, 08:39 AM.

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                      • #12
                        George is a semi-pro curmudgeon. Don't take it personally, he treats everybody equally.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          So Richard.

                          Does your smaller torque wrench handle 31.2 inch pounds?


                          Mike
                          Mike

                          My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RichardG
                            Looking for a way to change formula foot lbs. into inch lbs my motor cycle owner's manual has some parts that require 2.6 foot lbs my tork wrench doesen't go anywhere near that low. I have and inch lbs tork wrench. Or do they make something that actualy goes that low? A lot of the bolts and such range from 16 ft.lbs. down to 2.6.
                            Thanks in advance Richard
                            I'd bet the OP doesn't have an issue multiplying by 12 but just wasn't sure what units of torque actually were. Don't let the nastiness dissuade you from asking, that's the point of all this - to learn.

                            if you had a long wrench sticking out sideways and on a bolt....and you put a one pound weight on, 1 foot out; thats a foot/pound. Same as 12 inch pounds. If you put 3 pounds on it you've got 3 foot pounds. If you put one pound on it, 3' out, that's also three foot pounds. T=force * distance, and going from inches to feet is just a factor of 12.


                            Torque is a specification given for fasteners of all sizes, not just head bolts. You'll find torque specs in production for all sized fasteners. For example there are small torque measure devices that are like screw drivers for small fasteners in say electronics to even finer ones like these

                            http://www.hoskin.qc.ca/uploadpdf/In...a04e5c88d9.pdf
                            Last edited by Mcgyver; 02-04-2010, 10:04 AM.
                            .

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                            • #15
                              The problem isn't KNOWING things like this........

                              The problem is in not being taught how to THINK about it. Education has failed the public, and it started a long time ago.

                              Blaming Bush is popular, an easy brush-off that "answers the issue" with words that some like to say, but it's wrong..... Just jingoistic bullcrap for those who don't enjoy thinking very much.

                              The educational system is no longer trying to teach this stuff. It wasn't trying when I was taught math. I was in what is now "middle school" when the "new math" came in, and it was trash...... probably because the teachers didn't know what to do with it. The difference between the prior practical application method of teaching, and the new "theory first" method was very obvious. Nearly nobody was anywhere near as interested in math theory as the educational eggheads wanted them to be, so they started off bored, and learned nearly nothing.

                              EDIT: The textbook folks apparently forgot the notion that math is a tool, and so the theory became so separated from actual usage that the fact that it was at all useful got lost. It was very difficult to make geometry non-physical and so geometry got more interest from many people than "set theory" and "number theory", which were pushed up into the math program almost before arithmetic, apparently as a ploy to drive students away from math, science, and engineering.

                              Now that it is more important to 'feel good" about understanding nothing than to actually understand anything, I doubt it's any better.

                              anyway....

                              Units of any sort are not unrelated to each other, they have some relation, an inch is 2.54 CM, 25.4 mm, etc. And of course, a "foot" is 12 inches.

                              So if you have something in mm, and you want inches, you figure there is a "factor" of 25.4 in there somewhere. Then, since you MULTIPLY inches by 25.4 to get mm, it figures that you DIVIDE by 25.4 to get inches from mm.

                              All these things start by knowing that there is a relationship, and so there must be a conversion, and then reasoning out what it should be, based on the relationship of the units.

                              Some may argue that they wouldn't know which was right.... but if you start figuring these things out, pretty soon you realize that the correct conversion is actually fairly obvious. So the correct answer can be known, even without anyone else telling you it is right.

                              Math is only a tool.
                              Last edited by J Tiers; 02-04-2010, 10:15 AM.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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