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  • Enco keyway broachs

    I am looking to buy a set of keyway broaches, 1/8"-3/8" from Enco and I am considering the import set because of the enormous price difference, $118.99 vs $278.00 for Dumont. First off I am well aware of "you get what you pay for" and I am not asking if they are nearly as good as Dumont, I already assume they are not, but I would like to know if anyone here has used them and how would you rate them? These would be for occasional use but sometimes they would be used to cut keyways in hubs made from 4140 however this would be a short slot 1/4"x1/4"x3/8" and most every thing else would be mild steel. If these things are total junk then maybe I will pass on them but if they will work ok for occasional hobby type use then they may be all I need.

  • #2
    If its just occasional work, an alternative could be make a single tooth style broching machine, basicly just a tight fiting bore/ram (or boring bar held in a mill quill) with a big ass lever to move it back and forth, use lathe or mill table to move the lever or work for infeed each pass. Grind the single tooth bit outta HSS.
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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    • #3
      They do work well for your "occasional" work. Keep them well lubed. I have a mixture of Dumont and import. Not sure I notice the difference.
      Last edited by lakeside53; 02-05-2010, 10:15 PM.

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      • #4
        What you really need, Radkins, is a [email protected]@ shaper. Ditch the keyway sets and buy a shaper

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        • #5
          I have a set I got on sale from Grizzly about five years ago.

          The 1/4" Grizzly has done 50-60 keyways in 4130 and still cuts fine.

          I use Tap Magic.

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          • #6
            The important thing is do you have an arbor press to use them in?

            Try this, pick the one you will use the most and buy that size and the bushing you will most use and try it out. If you don't like it or it fails your not out the price of the whole set.
            It's only ink and paper

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            • #7
              Ok, I decided to get the imports.

              I suppose if I were buying these things as tools that I earned my living with I would have gotten the Dumont but since I retired I now just buy what works at the best price unless the "bargain" stuff is just complete junk.



              Originally posted by J.Ramsey
              I use Tap Magic.

              That was my next question, thanks!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Carld
                The important thing is do you have an arbor press to use them in? .

                No not yet and I have been told that using a hydraulic press is a very good way to ruin them. I have thought about building a jig similar to an arbor press to use with my hydraulic one but if that turns out to be too much trouble I will try to find an arbor type. If I do have to get an arbor press any suggestions as to size I will need? The broaches are 1/8" to 3/8".

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                • #9
                  You need to get at least a 3 ton. A 5 ton would be even better. Make sure to get the kind with a ratchet mechanism, otherwise the handle will nearly always be at a bad angle or in an awkward position.
                  Kansas City area

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                  • #10
                    With an arbor press you can feel if the broach is binding, if using a hydraulic press it would be a good idea to release the pressure every 1/4" or so and start again.

                    I use a Dake # 1 for 1/8 thru 3/8 anything larger goes in the hydraulic press.

                    I broke a 1" about 30 years ago on a drag line gear hub with a electric/hydro press, needless to say the boss wasn't happy.

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                    • #11
                      I prefer Dumont or Savage,the imports I have tried range from usable to complete junk.

                      If your arbor press handle is the fixed type a cheap 3/4" drive ratchet and socket is the fix.Turn down the pinion shaft to fit in a socket close to it's size and weld it on.Pop the ratchet in and presto adjustable angle ratcheting handle cheap.
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wierdscience
                        If your arbor press handle is the fixed type a cheap 3/4" drive ratchet and socket is the fix.Turn down the pinion shaft to fit in a socket close to it's size and weld it on.
                        Wierdscience, you are a genius. Just as I was thinking about how many times the handle has been in the wrong place, along comes the solution. Now I just need to figure how to put it on that 3.5" pinion end.

                        To the OP, thanks for the question. I've often wondered about cheap(er) broaches.

                        Den

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nheng
                          Now I just need to figure how to put it on that 3.5" pinion end.
                          Get a 3/4" female to 1/2" male square drive reducing adapter. Drill a hole in the end of the pinion to just accept the 1/2" male square drive. Tap the adapter into the hole, then weld around the circumference of the adapter.

                          Be sure to use an impact adapter (black oxide finish).

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                          • #14
                            Build a ratchet

                            I have not used import broaches so I can't compare. I get them for free in trade for boring and broaching custom sheaves and parts for a local company.

                            I use a 3 ton Jet arbor press modified with both a home built ratchet and a fine adjust/set-up handle. My goal was to modify the press and still be able to return it to factory specifications. The ratchet mechanism was cut out on a band saw and uses the original handle hole to pin in place. I also tore apart the press and installed bronze wear plates to adjust for play in the ram. Using way oil for lubricant on the ram works well. A9 for aluminum and dark cutting oil for steel works well.

                            The only thing left to build is a device to catch the broach when it falls at the end of the operation. At this time it is a large coffee can with some rags for padding.

                            I agree that the "feel" of the manual press is important especially with the smaller sized broaches.

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                            • #15
                              I just leave the bolt that holds the pinion in off , when I need to reposition the handle pull it out enough to unmesh the teeth turn handle where you want it , push back in and keep going.

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