Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Coolant/Chip Containment for a Lathe

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Coolant/Chip Containment for a Lathe

    I would appreciate tips/examples for methods others have
    used to contain coolant so that it isn't paddled around the
    shop by the chuck jaws while drilling on a manual lathe.

    Containment of coolant and chips during other operations
    would be a bonus outcome. Ideally, the apparatus would
    remain in place and not interfere significantly with control
    usage.

    The machine in question has an OEM backsplash, chip tray
    and a chuck guard. It is similar to the Jet shown below
    (although the Jet lacks the chuck guard.)
    Adhoc shields have been made up as required in the past,
    but none of these have been considered suitable prototypes
    worthy of refinement into a more permanent enclosure.

    .

  • #2
    The ones I have seen and used were a half circle of metal or lexan that were over the chuck and could be lifted up and to the rear to get to the chuck. I have seen similar guards mounted on the carriage that kept chips and coolant from escaping as the carriage moved along the bed.

    The carriage shield was positioned to run under the shield over the chuck but everything has to be adjusted to clear the chuck jaws.
    It's only ink and paper

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, sounds similar to the horseshoe-shaped arrangements cobbled
      together here with the exception that these dropped into place
      - no provision for a hinge action.

      What do you think about a canopy extending to the right from the
      head stock perhaps 1/3 along the bed. It would project forward
      toward the operator from a hinge point at the top of the backsplash
      and then drop down out beyond the apron to meet an extension
      added to the chip tray to enclose the apron.

      Alternatively, there might be a moving curtain section added to the
      apron. This curtain would travel between the upper canopy and a
      lower extension on the chip tray. The purpose here being to keep
      controls on the apron readily at hand.

      .

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Carld
        The ones I have seen and used were a half circle of metal or lexan that were over the chuck and could be lifted up and to the rear to get to the chuck. I have seen similar guards mounted on the carriage that kept chips and coolant from escaping as the carriage moved along the bed.

        The carriage shield was positioned to run under the shield over the chuck but everything has to be adjusted to clear the chuck jaws.
        Here is one picture that is somewhat similar though it runs over the chuck guard.
        http://www.jihshun.com.tw/pd-gif/AS/...st%20guard.JPG

        Thing is, I would expect either the <qbert>%@#$%@#$%</qbert> compound gets in the way of the splash guard or vice versa. And on some machines the guard would proceed to dump coolant and swarf right on your lead screw. And maybe your hands and/or shoes or into the apron gearing as well. The operator controls, especially the hopelessly obsolete compound (no need when you can control X and Z algorithmically) , are in the way.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have wondered if I could mount a air nozzle to blow the coolant off the work towards the rear splash shield.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't even have a proper chuck guard, but I make out OK by minimizing the flow of coolant - you only need a little stream generally. Also, aim the coolant at the tool, not the workpiece. 90% drips right off and never flings into the air.

            Comment


            • #7
              I think a lot of users use to much coolant, it only takes a little to do the job. All you really need is a cover over the length of the chuck and maybe one to follow the carriage travel. It still tends to flow off the front of the carriage at times.

              I just don't like to use flood coolant but that is something each person has to decide if they really need it or not.
              It's only ink and paper

              Comment


              • #8
                I agree if it's sent spinning across the room you might be a little too liberal with the flow try cutting back to a trickle and see if that helps. Alistair
                Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thank you for the suggestions.

                  The pieces that prompted the post are 3" OD x 1.375" thick steel
                  blanks that were being drilled (prior to being bored and threaded.)

                  The depth of the part was such that I wanted sufficient flow to help
                  assist coolant in reaching the tip of the drill. It also meant that the
                  face of the part was close to the jaws, which acted like impeller
                  blades, flinging residual coolant up and outward.

                  In many commercial shops, I doubt there would be much concern
                  about some scattered coolant. But in this HS, it would be nice to
                  keep the coolant contained.

                  .

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X