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Slightly OT: Looking for small wire splices...making them is tedious

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  • Slightly OT: Looking for small wire splices...making them is tedious

    Hello,

    I am working on a project where I need some tiny, uninsulated, wire splices. Last night, I made about 8 of them, out of brass, with the following dimensions:

    Length: 0.100
    Outside Diameter: 0.080
    Inside Diameter: 0.052

    While they do not really need to be made out of brass, they need to be able to be crimped in order to splice nichrome wire with 20 gauge stranded wire. Since the device they are being used on is small, they need to be small too.

    I wouldn't have a problem making them, however, similar size mass produced parts are usually less than 10 cents each so it doesn't make economic sense for me to make them. Also, after I cut one off, I have to go on a treasure hunt in order to figure out where it landed.

    I have seen some electronic devices with something similar in them; but, I don't know what they could be called. I have tried looking for ferrules, splices, sleeves, and I still haven't found anything with those dimensions. The closest I found where ferrules; but, they were around 1/4 inch long.

    Thanks in advance for any advice.

    Regards,

    Brian
    There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

  • #2
    Hypodermic tubing. Someone posted a site that sells all sizes in stainless steel.
    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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    • #3
      Check fischer scientific, they have HPLC tubing in that range. Definitely in SS, but you might find copper. uBore tubing is smaller on the OD, standard HPLC tubing is 1/8" OD. uBore is thin enough to crimp easy, standard will crimp with force.

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      • #4
        The smallest ferrules I've found are for 24 awg wire, 5 mm. long. Mouser electronics has these.

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        • #5
          Many electronic connectors use machined pins which are crimp type. We use them for splicing, just cut the connector part off and use the barrel.

          It's best to have the right crimp tool but...


          Mike
          Mike

          My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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          • #6
            Just buy some 2 mm or 5/64 brass tube
            such as
            http://www.specialshapes.com/brasstu...sp?product=006

            Take a block of Acrylic and saw down into it with a very fine razor saw (Exacto) from a hobby shop.
            Then drill a cross hole the proper size for the tube, through the saw cut.
            Grind the block down until the sawcut is the desired length to the edge.
            Feed in the tube , and cut with a few strokes, then push the tube in again and eject the finished part.
            Rich
            Green Bay, WI

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            • #7
              Hers's how I made a similar part:

              http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...production+job
              Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
              ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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              • #8
                Google beanie crimp connectors - this type might me small enough for your application

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                • #9
                  Hello,

                  Since it looks like I will have to cut them to size, regardless, I think the best option is probably for me to cut them out of brass tubing as it saves me the drilling time.

                  McMaster has 3/32 brass tubing at $12.24 for 15 feet, in one foot lengths. The OD is 0.0937 and the ID is 0.066. This should be close enough for the application.

                  Thanks!

                  Brian
                  There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

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                  • #10
                    many hobby shops and hardware stores sell small diameter brass tubing

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                    • #11
                      Or copper.

                      Sliding a smaller diameter solid brass in the part your cutting slid in just past the cut mark saves some deburr time.

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                      • #12
                        This might be worth exploring: http://www.labx.com/v2/spiderdealer2...m?LVid=7041452

                        Territool is the best of this type, but it's $250 from fischers. Two quick spins, snap it, you're done.

                        I used an abrasive cut off with a built in deburr tool, but I think it would be cost prohibitive and clog the wheel with brass or copper. Good on stainless.

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                        • #13
                          Have you thought about going to a fishing tackle shop? They have all sorts of crimps there for doing (stainless) trace and may have something you can use. I bought some myself for another project where I have a hundred plus stainless wires to work the valves on a pipe organ.
                          One tip I would give you though is to buy the best crimping pliers you can afford - the cheap ones soon become a pain in the wrist.
                          Michael

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                          • #14
                            I just saw what was probably brass plated steel tubing pieces at a dollar store in the craft section. I almost bought a bag of them, but instead I'll remember they're there if I ever need any small pieces of tubing like that. The size was about like you've described, and length looked to be about 3/4 inch or so. I think they are decorative pieces made to be threaded onto string along with beads.

                            I did the math in my head- inch for inch that was about a third of the price you'd pay for brass tubing in a hobby shop, and I think that for your application this would be better than brass.
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MotorradMike
                              Many electronic connectors use machined pins which are crimp type. We use them for splicing, just cut the connector part off and use the barrel.

                              It's best to have the right crimp tool but...


                              Mike

                              "...But..."

                              No, No, NO, NO, NO! No "buts" about it, it is absolutely vital to use the proper crimp tool. PERIOD. I have had to re-do too many of these improperly crimped connections.

                              If you are going to crimp, use the right tool.
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              Make it fit.
                              You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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