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  • fighting rust

    I have my machines in an unheated garage, what have you found to help with spot rusting. I try to keep everything oiled, but things like do all band saw table
    I also use for wood. Is wax a good idea. I keep the lathe under a cloth cover, should I put a small light bulb ( safely) under it to keep it a bit higher temp. Thanks if you have any ideas on this. kevin

  • #2
    If the interior air of your shop heats somewhat during the day faster than the mass metal of your equipment, you'll have some slight moisture form on it. Like a cold beer can taken out of the fridge and set on the counter.

    Any type of cover that traps or holds moisture can be a problem.

    Ever try LPS #3 Rust Inhibitor? I think it works very well.

    http://www.lpslabs.com/product_pg/co...n_pg/lps3.html

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    • #3
      wax might not be a good idea pain in the neck to keep cleaning it up all the time.maybe putting oil on the bed ways and other areas that are rust attractors might help , same as the band saw table coat it with some oil, good stuff not used oil, i keep my lathe and mill coated when not in use my drill press same thing band saw same thing, no rust on my tool. usualy i have myshop heated but now that i found out its costing me 89 bucks a month to heat it i keep the heat of now when iam not in there unless i know the next day and so on that ill be in there, the warrmer tools are the better it is for them , constante heat up and chill of any metals is not good for it, metal in wood and wood are very similer in that heat expands metal and cold makes it contract where wood seems to work the oppisit, erventually something is going to go wronge...i try to keep all my stuff at a constante temp as best i can , and keeping your machines well oiled is not going to hurt them.

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      • #4
        There are products to keep wood working tools from rusting. The names elude me, but they are spray on. Might work on the saw, but you metal work might scrape it off.

        Mobil 1 does a great job of rust prevention and leaves a very long lasting film. Great for the unpainted surfaces of you metal working machines. Reapply after use, but you can leave it for a year unused, and it will not rust. I've done that.

        Add an LP heater in a poorly sealed garage and you double your trouble!

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        • #5
          I use Boeshield T-9 on all of my tools that have a large flat surface like the table saw, band saw, and the anvil.



          It leaves a light wax coating after it dries and can be wiped off immediately for a light coat or left alone for a heavy coat. It works great for the tools that sit in humid and/or unheated spaces. Lots of bicycle shops carry it for use on bike chains.

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          • #6
            I use Break Free CLP purchased in the 1/2 gallon size to get the price down. It works well on lathe ways and can take repeated condensation for months without rusting and then wipes off easily with a cloth. For long term, I use LPS 3. Too bad that stuff is now $12.00 a spray can at my source. I use to get it for $3.00 and used it on farm equipment outside such as cutter bar sickles and hydraulic couplings for season long protection.

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            • #7
              I use wax on all of my woodworking equipment's tables. You don't want oil getting on the wood. A couple coats of automotive wax protects pretty darn well.

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              • #8
                Regarding automotive wax on woodworking tools, I have read a couple of things that say the silicone in many automotive waxes can cause problems with some finishes. I use a non-silicone wax.

                Xeddog

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                • #9
                  Lps3

                  I also like LPS3 very much. Have used it for many lears with good results.

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                  • #10
                    thanks for the help. kevin

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                    • #11
                      I made up plywood covers for my mill table, bandsaw table and lathe bed. Nothing elaborate, just a chunk of 3/4 ply with 1 1/2" lips tacked to either side so they stay put. The ones for the mill table fit nicely on either side of the vise.

                      Oil the surface, then put on the cover. They saturate pretty quickly at the contact points and from my experience give you 100% protection so long as you remember to put them back on when you're done using the machine. The ones on my mill are left on there (usually) during use, and help keep chips out of the T slots, and give me a nice surface to rest mics and whatnot on.

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                      • #12
                        LPS 3 is certainly one good option.
                        And I've found a periodic coating with Johnsons paste wax works well on my table saw and band saw tables.

                        I've also found diesel fuel to provide pretty good rust protection.

                        I keep several lightly saturated oily rags in a sealed can just for wiping on some rust prevention. It seems quicker and simpler to do by having the oily rags immediately handy.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lynnl
                          I've also found diesel fuel to provide pretty good rust protection.
                          #2 for diesel ..i've blathered all my garage equipment with it for 20yrs..
                          no rust anywhere..easy to wipe and better than wd40 imho, and I'm more than often than not using it to machine aluminium aswell..
                          I've also mixed it with vaseline to look after some cutters in storage..

                          rob

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                          • #14
                            Hi guys,
                            Over here in Scotland, this winter has been a total pain, with the severe weather we have been having, coupled to the fact that my asbestos corrugated roof on my garage is giving leakage problems, Its days are numbered!
                            however as regards oiling up my machine beds, recently a couple of builders gave me some membrane sheeting, This is a blue sheet that is used in the cavity walls of new build houses, especially kit constructed buildings, This material guards against the dripping water, and is a waterproof yet breathable material, On the warmer days i put on a de-humidifier, In the cold weather, i tend to stay in my small workshop, which is lined and heated, Some of the building firms would give you someoff-cuts as tarps I find this stuff excellent

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                            • #15
                              some more good ideas, thanks again . kevin

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