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  • Sewing machine

    Well thanx to all the advice and where to Look I found a sewing Machine. The guy said it has a walking foot? (whatever that looks like) It is a Singer
    Industrial Singer Sewing Machine Model 251-2, in table with working lamp.
    The table measures 47" wide and 20 3/4" in depth. It is $220 dollars and the Pics look good. Making pickup arrangements. Is this a good model? Thanx Guys for the Help

  • #2
    Does it have a needle feed or walking foot? I do not think it does.
    Here is a link to the manual:

    http://parts.singerco.com/IPsvcManuals/251.pdf

    Terry

    This is a picture of the feet on my 111w-155 Singer. The inner foot and the needle and feed dog feed the fabric. Then the outer foot presses
    down on the fabric to hold it while the needle and feed dog and inner foot move back for another stitch.
    I believe Singer called this "Needle Feed".



    Last edited by terry_g; 02-28-2010, 01:33 PM.

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    • #3
      Two standards of the world are the Singer sewing machine and the CocaCola logo. A friend who has 25 years in the oil fields of the world, allowed that with every household move, his goods would be broken into. After loosing two machines, he would personally carry the wife's portable Singer along with his luggage, just like another suitcase.

      Usually a commercial machine (walking foot) will be way, way too fast for a beginning sewer. To sew heavy materials, especially naugahyde types and make a good looking stitch, plan on 'softening' down on the speed control, so as to make it not so 'touchy'. No need for speed while learning. YMMV

      --G

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      • #4
        A good way to soften down the speed of the industrial machine is just to put a tennis ball under the tredal.
        John L

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        • #5
          Most older machines used a clutch motor. Slipping the clutch would not be a good idea. I made a smaller motor pulley on mine, reducing the speed from about 2500 stitches per minute to about 1500. My wife has no problem with it but it still scares me.

          Terry

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          • #6
            WAY TOO FAST, upholstery is way too expensive.. for me anyways.



            I have seen people also run the belt beside the pulley on the 5/8" shaft.. instead of the 3" v-pulley..
            This one, I bored a bushing to fit the sewing machine shaft, then brazed the cast iron pulley to the bushing, locked it onto the shaft, bought a larger belt and been smiling every since..
            Excuse me, I farted.

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            • #7
              Now More confused than Normal (which is Bad enough)

              The guy says it has a walking foot? is this model (i looked throught the manual) come with a walking foot? I didnt see any mention in the manual? HM Its tricky buying stuff that you dont know much about.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by madman
                The guy says it has a walking foot? Does this model come
                with a walking foot (I looked through the manual) ?
                If you have the machine in hand, does the foot articulate back and forth
                as the machine feeds?

                From Wikipedia: Sewing Machine
                A walking foot replaces the stationary presser foot with one that
                moves with the feed. A machine might have a single walking foot,
                or two walking feet with alternating action, and either drop feed or
                needle feed might be used as well. Walking foot feed is most often
                used for sewing heavy materials where needle feed is mechanically
                inadequate. It is also helpful with spongy or cushioned materials
                where lifting the foot out of contact with the material helps in the
                feeding action. Only a very few household machines have a walking
                foot, but this type of feed is common in industrial heavy duty machines.
                Not Singers, but these demonstrate a Walking Foot feed in action.

                .

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                • #9
                  Wow thanx

                  Nice Movies. Interesting. I am still looking for one as the previous guys macjhine didnt have a wal;king foot. ??

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                  • #10
                    keep looking for a pfaff industrial machine. Peter
                    The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

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                    • #11
                      My cousin's wife runs an industrial sewing machine... at full freaking speed.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by terry_g

                        This is a picture of the feet on my 111w-155 Singer. The inner foot and the needle and feed dog feed the fabric. Then the outer foot presses
                        down on the fabric to hold it while the needle and feed dog and inner foot move back for another stitch.
                        I believe Singer called this "Needle Feed".


                        I think that is a compound feed or dual-feed or something along those lines. A needle feed doesn't have a two-piece foot like that. I have a 153W needle feed, and the needle moves back with the foot, then the foot moves forward, and then the needle comes up for the next stitch.

                        As for the extreme speed of an industrial machine, you can get servo motor drives that don't have a clutch for industrial machines. It is like a normal domestic sewing machine motor that is controlled by the foot pedal, only it is about 20 times as powerful and it is made to drive an industrial machine. You can find tons of them on fleabay. They can be set up to run VERY slowly. I have one on my 153W because my fingers don't move fast enough to cope with 2000 stitches per minute and the blazing speed of the clutch motors scares me. The other thing about the servo drives is that they are off when you aren't pushing down on the pedal, unlike a clutch motor which runs 100% of the time unless you unplug it.

                        andy b.
                        The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

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                        • #13
                          On the old Singers, where do you find the model #? Mine is labeled as 1/3 hp, 220 volts but the plug is set up for a standard 120 outlet. The foot treadle controls the clutch I think and there is a knee paddle also. The box that had the motor lable has a switch to turn the motor on and off. I found the serial number and a separate tag that was probably a property tag.
                          North Central Arkansas

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                          • #14
                            I have approximately 6 sewing machines in my basement. No, I don't sew. I had a parking garage one block from my house which became a giant garage sale once a month. One guy would bring a sewing machine every time for which he wanted $5. I could not refuse. All were in perfect shape with all gadjets. I have a Singer feather weight, complete with box, bobbins, manual etc., and an old wilcox that sews leather, a few with the hump back wood case that latches over top of them with fancy painting and gold leaf. I have never used them but could not pass them up for the price. Yes, I am a pack rat. But, what beautiful machines!! For $5 each, who could pass it up??? Fred

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                            • #15
                              I have an industrial machine & I needed to slow it down to work on boat covers. Don't slip the clutch it wont last. There are DC stepper motors made to bolt right in but are $150.
                              I set up a second pulley under the table that knocked the speed down by 1/3. This seems to be about right for my kind of work.

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